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The Londoners &The Knack (1965-67)

The Londoners &The Knack (1965-67)


British Garage Beat band from Ilford, later based in London, originally know as The Londoners  who spent most of their time in Germany. Topper Clay left the band in Spring 1967 to join New York Public Library. He was followed by Brian Morris in 1968, after which Paul Gurvitz formed The Gun. 


The Ilford-spawned quartet the Knack (not to be confused with the American band of that name) existed for three years, and cut a half-dozen singles for English Decca and Pye Records' Piccadilly subsidiary. They never managed to get a chart placement, despite a valiant attempt at a cover of a Kinks song ("Who'll Be the Next in Line") with Larry Page producing for their debut. From those relatively tough, punk-ish influences, the group evolved into more of a mod-ish outfit by 1966, when they'd jumped to Piccadilly, with some serious interest in folk-rock -- they made a specialty out of covering Lovin' Spoonful tracks such as "Younger Girl" and "Did You Ever Have to Make Up Your Mind," the latter with some cool fuzzed out guitar from Adrian Gurvitz. The Knack even tried the German gambit that had worked to sustain various English outfits that couldn't get a hearing at home, but somehow they never managed to catch on playing a market that seemingly embraced (at least for a short time) every English-speaking band that went there. Guitarist/singer Adrian Gurvitz (then known as Adrian Gurvitz-Curtis); his brother, bassist/singer Paul Gurvitz; and drummer Louis Farrell parted with Tim Mycroft and formed the much harder rocking trio Gun. That band scored a number-eight British hit with "Race With the Devil," while Mycroft became a member of Sounds Nice, who cut sides for Parlophone Records in the late '60s.

The Londoners &The Knack (1965-67)

The Londoners &The Knack (1965-67)

The Londoners &The Knack (1965-67)


The Londoners &The Knack (1965-67)

The Knack - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)

The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)


The original, ‘60’s Sunset Strip era Knack was formed in 1965 at Hollywood High by Michael Chain. The band was originally named The In Mates but after a Shindig road show changed their moniker to The Knack.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Knack_(1960s_US_band)

The original InMates line-up consisted of:

Michael Chain - Lead Vocals,
Dink Kaplan - Guitar,
Ken Meyers - Drums, and
Larry Gould - Bass.
Bobby Cochran  later replaced Kaplan and Pug Baker replaced Meyers.

The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)

The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)

The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)

The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)

The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)


The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)

If you ever wanted an illustration of the idea that history is written by the winners, you need look no further than the story of the Knack. Everyone knows how Doug Fieger's heavily hyped skinny-tie band became a new wave sensation under that name via their blockbuster 1979 single, "My Sharona." But 12 years earlier, another L.A. singer/songwriter/guitarist led his band through its own brief swirl of publicity using the same band name and recording for the same label (Capitol). Although they were just as talented in their own way as the "My Sharona" gang, Michael Chain's '60s iteration of the Knack never came near a hit, and despite a big promo push for their initial batch of singles, they never cut a full album, and they quickly slipped through the cracks of history, unknown to all but hardcore '60s pop mavens. Hell, they weren't even the best-known '60s band to call themselves the Knack -- that honor goes to the London group that became better known after changing their name to Gun. Fortunately for the wider world, indefatigable '60s pop archivist label Now Sounds has gathered together the entire recorded output of Chain's Knack, finally giving them the album they always deserved, four and a half decades after the fact. The band released only four singles during its brief lifespan, and all the A and B sides are present and accounted for here, along with five previously unheard tunes and an alternate mix. The Knack's 1967 debut single, "I'm Aware"/"Time Waits for No One," shows the band's knack -- ahem -- for perky, Buckinghams-like pop on the latter tune and its penchant for pushing the envelope, with the odd time signatures and exotic addition of the zither-like marxophone on the former. From the subtle jazz shadings of "Softly, Softly" to the moody folk-rock feel of the unreleased Beau Brummels-ish "The Girl with the Dark Brown Eyes" (written for actress Barbara Hershey, Chain's objet d'amour at the time), it's clear that even in the short amount of time they had to evolve, the Knack already possessed an unusual amount of sophistication. Late as it is in arriving, their first full-length release is still a striking document.

The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)

The Londoners &The Knack (1965-67)The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)

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