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The Tradewinds ‎– Excursions (1967)

The Tradewinds ‎– Excursions (1967)


In 1965 a striking single called "New York's a Lonely Town" by a group called the Tradewinds flitted briefly across pop radio. Telling the story of a California surfer stuck in New York for the winter, the song was beautifully produced, echoing some of the studio techniques then favored by Brian Wilson, and although the song's premise seems even more ridiculous now than it did then, "New York's a Lonely Town" has such a memorable, lilting melody and projects such willful yearning and innocence that it is somewhat of a lost pop treasure.

The Tradewinds were actually Peter Andreoli (he is also known professionally as Peter Anders) and Vincent Poncia Jr., a pair of Rhode Island songwriters who had a minor doo wop-inflected hit with "Mr. Lonely" in 1960 while calling themselves the Videls, and who had written "(The Best Part Of) Breakin' Up" for producer Phil Spector and the Ronettes. The Tradewinds put out a few additional singles (including "Mind Excursion" and the pretty "I Believe in Her") and an album before morphing into the Innocence and issuing a single under that name ("There's Got to Be a Word") late in 1966.

An album credited to the Innocence followed, and then the duo began recording a project under their own names. Andreoli and Poncia parted ways shortly after The Anders & Poncia Album was issued by Warner Bros. as the 1960s drew to a close. Poncia resurfaced a few years later as a producer for Ringo Starr, Kiss, and other acts, while Andreoli kept a lower profile. "New York's a Lonely Town" remains their high watermark, one of the great lost singles of the surf era.

The Tradewinds ‎– Excursions (1967)


The Tradewinds' "New York's a Lonely Town," a 1965 Top 40 single, was the best Beach Boys imitation bar none. It's perhaps inevitable that their sole LP, though it does of course feature "New York's a Lonely Town," is a letdown in comparison, as groups whose signature tune is a soundalike rarely match it with anything else in their repertoire. While nothing else on the record is as blatantly derivative of the mid-'60s Beach Boys, there is a light Beach Boys influence on much of the LP in the presence of high, airy harmonies. The other tracks, however, aren't as firmly in Beach Boys territory, instead sounding a little like an East Coast variation of sunshine pop, or perhaps sunshine pop-Beach Boys-lite with a little Lovin' Spoonful influence. Their sole other (and minor) hit single, "Mind Excursion," is here too, and while there's a slight psychedelic lilt to the lyrics, it's more akin to Lovin' Spoonful efforts like "She Is Still a Mystery to Me" (which it resembles quite a bit) than all-out psychedelia. None of the other songs are too memorable, though the harmonies and careful arrangements will be appreciated by hardcore fans of '60s harmony pop/rock. The 2008 Japanese CD reissue adds a couple bonus tracks, "That's When Your Heartache Begins" and "Hard Life."

The Innocence - The Innocence (1967)

The Innocence - The Innocence (1967)

Peter Anders and Vinnie Poncia began their career as the Tradewinds, a psychedelic pop duo who wrote music for artists such as the Ronettes, the Crystals, and other Phil Spector projects. They changed their name to the Innocence in 1967, releasing an eponymous album that was promoted by their label as a "good time" album in the vein of the Lovin' Spoonful. They broke up after the one release.

The Innocence - The Innocence (1967)

The Innocence - The Innocence (1967)

The Innocence - The Innocence (1967)

The Innocence - The Innocence (1967)

When it comes to records on which they were the performers, prolific songwriters, singers, and producers Pete Andreoli and Vinnie Poncia, Jr. might be best known for their discs as the Tradewinds. Lesser known is this 1967 self-titled album by the Innocence, which is pop/rock at its bounciest and frothiest. It's an apt title for both album and band, considering it's from a time when much rock was getting decidedly less innocent by the minute. In contrast, the Innocence offered perky, well-crafted to the point of well-scrubbed tunes with the slightest of influences from folk-rock and psychedelia. Some of the songs -- including the Top 40 hit "There's Got to Be a Word (Beyond the Meaning of Love)" and the smaller hit "Mairzy Doats" -- could have been relics from the Tin Pin Alley/music hall era, though dressed up with harmonies and arrangements that could have only been possible in the sunshine pop era. This might be too sweet even for big fans of this sort of stuff, though it does vary the pace a little with bits of folk-rockish balladry ("Someone Got Caught in My Eye"), Motown ("All I Ask"), bossa nova ("Your Show Is Over"), and labelmates the Lovin' Spoonful (slightly recalled by "It's Not Gonna Take Too Long," and covered to unnotable effect on "Do You Believe in Magic"). The CD reissue on Rev-Ola has basic historical liner notes and two bonus tracks: the single versions of "There's Got to Be a Word (Beyond the Meaning of Love)" and "I Don't Wanna Be Around You."

VA - Anders & Poncia / Masterworks 1961-1967

VA  -  Anders & Poncia / Masterworks 1961-1967



Peter Andreoli (b. 28 April 1941, New York, USA) and Vincent Poncia Jnr. (b. 29 April 1942, New York, USA) were originally members of the Videls, who enjoyed minor US success with ‘Mister Lonely’ in June 1960. Switching to full-time songwriting, the duo worked with the Aberbachs at Hill and Range music. They enjoyed a close association with Phil Spector, penning songs for several of his protégés, including the Ronettes (‘Do I Love You’, ‘How Does It Feel’, ‘The Best Part Of Breakin’ Up’), Crystals (‘Mary Ann’) and Darlene Love (‘He’s A Quiet Guy’, ‘Stumble And Fall’). They also recorded on Spector’s short-lived Shirley label as the Treasures. Under the name the Tradewinds, they enjoyed a US Top 40 hit with ‘New York’s A Lonely Town’ (number 32, February 1965), followed by the less successful ‘Mind Excursion’ (number 51, September 1966). They formed another studio outfit, the Innocence, reaching number 34 in the US charts with ‘There’s Got To Be A Word!’ in December 1966. In 1967 the pair released ‘So It Goes’/‘Virgin To The Night’ under their own name, and later moved to Warner Brothers Records, for whom they recorded The Anders And Poncia Album in 1969. By the end of the 60s, they parted, and Poncia went on to produce Fanny, Ellen Foley and Melissa Manchester. The partnership was reactivated in the mid-70s on albums by Mary Travers, Kiss and Ringo Starr.

VA  -  Anders & Poncia / Masterworks 1961-1967

64 tracks (feat. unreleased & alternate) from the songwriters Pete Anders & Vince Poncia with color booklet



VA  -  Anders & Poncia / Masterworks 1961-1967

VA  -  Anders & Poncia / Masterworks 1961-1967

VA  -  Anders & Poncia / Masterworks 1961-1967

VA  -  Anders & Poncia / Masterworks 1961-1967

VA  -  Anders & Poncia / Masterworks 1961-1967

VA  -  Anders & Poncia / Masterworks 1961-1967

VA  -  Anders & Poncia / Masterworks 1961-1967



"Hard-core Golden Oldies collectors (seeking such music in reformatted CD format) will know that the Providence, Rhode Island song-writing/producing team of Peter Andreoli (stage name Anders) and Vinnie Poncia had, as performers themselves, 7 songs reach various levels of the national Billboard charts under three different guises.

Their first, as part of the Doo-Wop group The Videls (along with Bobby Cilitri, Norman Marzano and Herb Rickey) was Mister Lonely (NOT the Bobby Vinton song) which made it to # 73 Billboard Pop Hot 100 in June 1960 b/w I'll Forget You on JDS 5004. Five years later, as The Trade Winds, they would take New York's A Lonely Town to # 32 Hot 100 in Feb 1965 b/w Club Seventeen on Red Bird 020 and, in May that year, The Girl From Greenwich Village to # 129 Hot 100 Bubble Under b/w There's A Rock And Roll Show In Town on Red Bird 028. The following year, now with Kama Sutra Records but still billed as The Trade Winds, they had Mind Excursion finish at # 51 Hot 100 in September b/w Little Susan's Dreamin' on Kama Sutra 212, and in December 1966 saw Catch Me In The Meadow top out at # 132 Bubble Under b/w I Believe In Her on Kama Sutra 218.

Even as that last was circulating, they were recording at Kama Sutra as The Innocence and in Dec 1966-Jan 1967 took There's Got To Be A Word! to # 34 Hot 100 b/w I Don't Wanna Be Around You on Kama Sutra 214, and scored their last, again as The Innocence, in March 1967 when their cover of the 1944 Merry Macs hit Mairzy Doats peaked at # 75 Hot 100 b/w A Lifetime Lovin' You on Kama Sutra 222.

This 64-track 2-CD set from Bell Tone Productions/Masterworks, which has excellent AAD sound reproduction and comes with a detailed 16-page insert, covers all the foregoing charted sides EXCEPT Mister Lonely and I'll Forget You as The Videls, nor do they include their only other JDS release as The Videls - Now That Summer Is Here b/w She's Not Coming Home on JDS 5005 - which is strange considering the plethora of previously unreleased material and in vierw of the fact they do include other Videls material. The charted side and its B-side can be found, however, in the 1996 Taragon volume "The Very Best Of The Videls (Yesterday And Today)."

The full contents of this set are shown in the Comments below and while it's a great detailed compilation, it may be just a bit of overkill for the average collector." ~ George O'Leary
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THanks COR !

The Tradewinds - Excursions (1967)

The Tradewinds - Excursions (1967)


The Trade Winds was an American pop group formed in Providence, Rhode Island. The group's members were Peter Andreoli (aka Peter Anders) and Vincent Poncia, Jr., and had previously had a hit single together (with a third member, Norman Marzano) under the name The Videls with a song called "Mr. Lonely", which hit #73 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1960. 
After a few single releases, The Videls folded, and Anders and Poncia began writing tunes with Phil Spector for groups such as The Ronettes and The Crystals. Recording under the name The Tradewinds in 1965, they released several singles and scored two more U.S. hits, "New York's a Lonely Town" (#32, 1965) and the psychedelic-tinged "Mind Excursion" (#51, 1966). In 1966 they changed their name to The Innocence, recorded a full-length eponymous album, and had two hit singles, "There's Got to Be a Word!" (U.S. #34, 1966 and "Mairzy Doats" (U.S. #75, 1967). Following the LP release the duo released another album under the name Anders & Poncia on Warner Bros. Records in 1969, and shortly after broke up.

Poncia later went on to produce material for artists such as Ringo Starr, Melissa Manchester and Kiss.

The group was mentioned on an episode of Mad Men (Season 5 Episode 3).

The Tradewinds - Excursions (1967)

The Tradewinds - Excursions (1967)

The Tradewinds - Excursions (1967)

Thanks Cor...

The Tradewinds ‎– Excursions (1967)The Innocence - The Innocence (1967)VA  -  Anders & Poncia / Masterworks 1961-1967The Tradewinds - Excursions (1967)

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