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The Baskerville Hounds - Featuring Space Rock, Part 2 (1967)

The Baskerville Hounds - Featuring Space Rock, Part 2 (1967)


The Baskerville Hounds - Featuring Space Rock, Part 2 (1967)
- William Emery - vocals, bass
- Michael Macron - vocals, drums
- Lawrence Meese - vocals, guitar, harmonica
- Dante Rossi - vocals, guitar
- Jack Topper - vocals, keyboards, vibes, accordion 

Based in Cleveland, Ohio, bassist William Emery, drummer Michael Macron, guitarists Lawrence Meese and Dante Rossi and keyboardist Jack Topper originally came together as The Talula Babies (see separate entry). Signed to James M. Testas local Tema label, the group released a pair of little heard 1967 singles "The Hurtin' Kind" b/w "Mine Forever" and "Debbie" b/w "". While the singles did little outside of Cleveland, under Testa's management the quintet underwent a radical image change, complete with ugly double breasted brown suits and a new name.

Signed with AVCO Embassy, as The Baskerville Hounds, they released the 1967 single "Hold Me" b/w "Here I Come Miami". A top-100 single, the effort was followed by "Caroline" b/w "Last Night On the Back Porch" on Buddah. Unable to find a major label for their next single, "Space Rock, Part. 2" b/w "" was released on Testa's own Tema label. A rollicking, organ-propelled slice of garage rock, the single was quickly picked up and reissued by Dot Records.

As was standard marketing procedure, on the heels of the single's unexpected success the band was rushed into the studio to record a support album. Cleverly released as 1967's "The Baskerville Hounds Featuring Space Rock, Part 2", the collection offered up a then-typical mix of popular covers and originals. Produced by Testa, the set wasn't particularly impressive. While all five member were credited as singers, the absence of a distinctive vocalist was a major distraction. Similarly, covers such as The Beatles "Penny Lane" and Neil Diamond's' "I'm a Believer" weren't particularly impressive. On the other hand, original numbers such as the fuzz guitar-propelled "Sad Eyed Lady", "Please Say" and the title track instrumental were all worth hearing. Hardly one of rock's "pretty boy" combos (the liner notes described Rossi as having a "comic appearance"), the doubled breasted brown suits sure didn't help their appearance - they looked like an exhausted burial party. A commercial failure, one last Christmas single ("Christmas Is Here" b/w "Make Me Your Man") and they were a musical footnote.
 "The Baskerville Hounds Featuring Space Rock, Part 2"


1.) Space Rock, Part. 2 (instrumental) (D.J. Kohler) - 3:40
2.) Make Me Your Man (D.J. Kohler) - 2:12
3.) Penny Lane (John Lennon - Paul McCartney) - 2:10
4.) Can't Take It (Larry Meese) - 2:20
5.) Although I Was to Blame (Larry Meese) - 2:30
6.) Sad Eyed Lady M. McGutcheon) - 2:05


1.) Never on Sunday (instrumental) (Hadjidakis - Towne) - 2:30
2.) Jackie's Theme (instrumental) (Jack Topper - D.J. Kohler) - 2:40
3.) I'm a Believer (Neil Diamond) - 2:18
4.) Baby Am I Losing (D.J. Kohler) - 2:10
5.) Please Say (Larry Meese) - 2:


Jimmy Smith & Dave"Baby"Cortez - Happy Organs... 2 in1

Jimmy Smith & Dave


Jimmy Smith wasn't the first organ player in jazz, but no one had a greater influence with the instrument than he did; Smith coaxed a rich, grooving tone from the Hammond B-3, and his sound and style made him a top instrumentalist in the 1950s and '60s, while a number of rock and R&B keyboardists would learn valuable lessons from Smith's example.

James Oscar Smith was born in Norristown, Pennsylvania on December 8, 1928 (some sources cite his birth year as 1925). Smith's father was a musician and entertainer, and young Jimmy joined his song-and-dance act when he was six years old. By the time he was 12, Smith was an accomplished stride piano player who won local talent contests, but when his father began having problems with his knee and gave up performing to work as a plasterer, Jimmy quit school after eighth grade and began working odd jobs to help support the family. At 15, Smith joined the Navy, and when he returned home, he attended music school on the GI Bill, studying at the Hamilton School of Music and the Ornstein School, both based in Philadelphia.

The Incredible Jimmy Smith at Club Baby Grand, Vol. 1 In 1951, Smith began playing with several R&B acts in Philadelphia while working with his father during the day, but after hearing pioneering organ player Wild Bill Davis, Smith was inspired to switch instruments. Smith bought a Hammond B-3 organ and set up a practice space in a warehouse where he and his father were working; Smith refined the rudiments of his style over the next year (informed more closely by horn players than other keyboard artists, and employing innovative use of the bass pedals and drawbars), and he began playing Philadelphia clubs in 1955. In early 1956, Smith made his New York debut at the legendary Harlem nightspot Small's Paradise, and Smith was soon spotted by Alfred Lion, who ran the well-respected jazz label Blue Note Records. Lion signed Smith to a record deal, and between popular early albums such as The Incredible Jimmy Smith at Club Baby Grand and The Champ and legendary appearances at New York's Birdland and the Newport Jazz Festival, Smith became the hottest new name in jazz.
Bashin': The Unpredictable Jimmy Smith A prolific recording artist, Smith recorded more than 30 albums for Blue Note between 1956 and 1963, collaborating with the likes of Kenny Burrell, Stanley Turrentine, and Jackie McLean, and in 1963, Smith signed a new record deal with Verve. Smith's first album for Verve, Bashin': The Unpredictable Jimmy Smith, was a critical and commercial success, and the track "Walk on the Wild Side" became a minor hit. Smith maintained his busy performing and recording schedule throughout the 1960s, and in 1966 he cut a pair of celebrated album with guitarist Wes Montgomery. In 1972, Smith's contract with Verve expired, and tired of his demanding tour schedule, he and his wife opened a supper club in California's San Fernando Valley. Smith performed regularly at the club, but it went out of business after only a few years. While Smith continued to record regularly for a variety of labels, his days as a star appeared to be over.
Bad However, in the late '80s, Smith began recording for the Milestone label, cutting several well-reviewed albums that reminded jazz fans Smith was still a master at his instrument, as did a number of live performances with fellow organ virtuoso Joey DeFrancesco. In 1987, producer Quincy Jones invited Smith to play on the sessions for Michael Jackson's album Bad. And Smith found a new generation of fans when hip-hop DJs began sampling Smith's funky organ grooves; the Beastie Boys famously used Smith's "Root Down (And Get It)" for their song "Root Down," and other Smith performances became the basis for tracks by Nas, Gang Starr, Kool G Rap, and DJ Shadow.
Damn! In 1995, Smith returned to Verve Records for the album Damn!, and on 2001's Dot Com Blues, Smith teamed up with a variety of blues and R&B stars, including Etta James, B.B. King, Keb' Mo', and Dr. John. In 2004, Smith was honored as a Jazz Master by the National Endowment for the Arts; that same year, Smith relocated from Los Angeles to Scottsdale, Arizona. Several months after settling in Scottsdale, Smith's wife succumbed to cancer, and while he continued to perform and record, Jimmy Smith was found dead in his home less than a year later, on February 8, 2005. His final album, Legacy, was released several months after his passing.
***
David Cortez Clowney known by the stage name Dave "Baby" Cortez (born August 13, 1938), is an American pop and R&B organist and pianist, best known for his 1959 hit, "The Happy Organ". David  played the organ "...with the same aggression as a pro football linebacker: he was theatrical, dressed loud, and loved playing exaggerated scales..."...
Though hardly a soulful, bluesy master like Jimmy Smith or dashing experimentalist like Larry Young, organist Dave "Baby" Cortez made his mark in the '50s,'60s, and '70s as a capable, often clever soloist and pop instrumentalist. His flair for catchy melodies, riffs, and hooks resulted in a number one pop and number five R&B hit with "The Happy Organ" in 1959. Cortez had another double winner in 1962 with "Rinky Dink," this one peaking at number nine R&B and number ten pop. Before his instrumental success, Cortez recorded for Ember as David Clowney in 1956, and was in the Pearls from 1955 to 1957. He landed one other song on the R&B Top 50, "Someone Has Taken Your Place," in 1973 for All Platinum. His other songs were recorded for Clock and Chess. There has been no domestic reissue of Cortez's songs, but there are import anthologies available.

Jimmy Smith - Hoochie Cooche Man

Jimmy Smith & Dave


Dave Baby Cortez  - Happy Organs,Wild Guitars And Piano Shuffles

Jimmy Smith & Dave

Wilmer & The Dukes (1969)

The band originated in 1957 in Geneva, New York, formed by Wilmer Alexander Jr. (born c. 1943), Ronnie Alberts, and Ralph Gillotte. Except for Alexander, all of the members were white, which made the band stand out even more in some of the all-black clubs that they first played in. The Alexanders lived on 90 Wadsworth Street in Geneva, and the band used to practice at one of the garages owned by the Felice Trucking Company on Kirkwood Ave.

Alexander sang and played saxophone, and the band was managed by Ebo (Owl) Alberts, the father of the drummer, Ronnie Alberts, and the bassist, Bob Egan. The guitarist, Doug Brown, was from the South and played Stevie Cropper-style. Doug Brown wrote their big hit "Give Me One More Chance". Ralph "Duke" Gillotte was the keyboardist and additional vocalist.

They were primarily a cover band, playing other people's material, such as by Steve Miller and The Rolling Stones. Other music was from Sam and Dave and there were also saxophone based hits such as those originated by Junior Walker & the AllStars. One of their most popular covers was Lee Dorsey's "Get Out of My Life Woman".


Wilmer and the Dukes (originally Wilmer Alexander Junior and the Dukes) were a United States R&B band in upstate New York in the 1960s. Though they produced only a handful of singles and one album, they performed regularly, and had a dedicated following. One reviewer said, "In Geneva, there were two kinds of kids. Those who went to 'Wilmer' and those who didn't." They are fondly remembered by many of the college alumni from that area, and their music continues to be played today. They were also an influence on other rising musicians such as Eric Bloom, the lead singer of Blue Öyster Cult, and they may have been the inspiration for "Otis Day and the Knights", the 1960s fictional band in the 1978 movie Animal House.

The group disbanded in 1974, but came back together for some benefit concerts in 1988. With several personnel changes, the band stayed together and played for the next 24 years as The Legendary Dukes until breaking up in early 2012.


Wilmer & The Dukes (1969) 
 Label:Forevermore Music & Records
Format:CD
Country:US 

1 Living In The USA 3:15
2 Count On Me 2:33
3 Get Out Of My Life, Woman 2:35
4 I Do Love You 3:15
5 Love-itis/Show Me 5:12
6 Heavy Time 2:27
7 St. James Infirmary 5:36
8 Get It (Instrumental) 2:40
9 I'm Free 2:37
10 Give Me One More Chance 2:40
11 Gettin' Over You 2:30
12 But It's Alright  3:07     
  
Released Jun 28, 1999 on the Forevermore label. Personnel: Doug Brown (guitar); Wilmer Alexander, Jr. (tenor saxophone, piano, keyboards); Larry Covelli, Jerome Richardson (tenor saxophone); Jerry Niewood, Arnie Lawrence (baritone saxophone); Sam Noto, Chuck Mangione (trumpet); Dennis Good, Sonny Ausman (trombone); Gap Mangione (piano, keyboards); Ron Alberts (drums, percussion); Vinnie Ruggiero (drums). 




The Left Banke - 2 in 1

The Left Banke - 2 in 1


This New York group pioneered "baroque & roll" in the '60s with its mix of pop/rock and grand, quasi-classical arrangements and melodies. Featuring teenage prodigy Michael Brown as keyboardist and chief songwriter, the group scored two quick hits with "Walk Away Renee" (number five) and "Pretty Ballerina" (number 15). Chamber-like string arrangements, Steve Martin's soaring, near-falsetto lead vocals, and tight harmonies that borrowed from British Invasion bands like the Beatles and the Zombies were also key elements of the Left Banke sound. Though their two hits are their only well-remembered efforts, their debut album (Walk Away Renee/Pretty Ballerina) was a strong, near-classic work that matched the quality of their hit singles in songwriting and production.
the Left Banke's internal dynamic wasn't nearly as harmonious as their sound, and their history goes some way toward explaining their short career. Initially, the group made some recordings that were produced by Brown's father, Harry Lookofsky. When these recordings failed to interest companies in signing the band, the Left Banke broke up, Brown moving to California with the group's original drummer. A backing track for "Walk Away Renee" had already been completed, and the other members overdubbed vocals in Brown's absence. The song was released on Smash and became a hit, and the musicians reunited to tour and continue recording.
Unfortunately, the group, which showed such tremendous promise, was quickly torn asunder by dissension. Due to the nature of their music (which often employed session musicians), the Left Banke's sound was difficult to reproduce on the road, and one could sympathize with Brown's wishes to become a Brian Wilson-like figure, concentrating on writing and recording while the rest of the musicians took to the road. A variety of guitarists, as both session musicians and ostensible group members, flitted in and out of the lineup; Rick Brand, credited as the guitarist on the first LP, actually plays on only one of the album's songs. Adding fuel to the fire, Brown's bandmates wanted to oust Brown's father as the act's manager. In early 1967, Brown went as far as to record a Left Banke single without them, using vocalist Bert Sommer.

That single ("And Suddenly") flopped, and for a brief time in September 1967 the original members were recording together again. After just one single ("Desiree"), though, Brown left for good. Most of the group's second and final album, The Left Banke Too, was recorded without him. While it still sported baroque arrangements and contained some fine moments, Brown's presence was sorely missed, and the record pales in comparison to their debut. Brown went on to form a Left Banke-styled group, Montage, which released a fine and underappreciated album in the late '60s. He later teamed up to form Stories with vocalist Ian Lloyd.
There were some confusing son-of-Left Banke recordings over the next few years, although the band really came to a halt in 1969, after the second album. Brown, Martin, and unknown musicians made a few recordings in late 1969; then, oddly, the original group re-formed for a fine early-1971 single on Buddah ("Love Songs in the Night" b/w "Two by Two"), although the record itself was credited to Steve Martin. And the original group, minus its key visionary Michael Brown, made an album's worth of ill-advised reunion recordings in 1978.

Walk Away Renee Pretty Ballerina 1967

The Left Banke - 2 in 1

The Left Banke - 2 in 1

While the rise of folk-rock acts like the Byrds and the Lovin' Spoonful brought 12-string guitars and autoharps into the rock & roll vocabulary, and the Beatles' "Yesterday" and "Eleanor Rigby" opened the door for a more artful use of strings in pop music, the Left Banke pioneered something new with their debut single, 1967's "Walk Away Renee," which incorporated a small string section, harpsichord, and woodwinds to give the song a light yet dramatic Baroque flavor that was unique in rock at the time, and a perfect complement to the song's bittersweet tale of unrequited love. the Left Banke's follow-up, "Pretty Ballerina," was even more striking, and while the group started to fall apart almost as soon as they achieved success, their debut album, named for the two hit singles, was one of the best LPs released in a year full of innovation in pop music. Michael Brown, the group's keyboard player, wrote most of the songs, and with producer and arranger Henry Lookofsky (who was also Brown's father) he helped brainstorm the unusual sound of the Left Banke's material, but vocalist Steve Martin-Caro also played a major role in these sessions; his vocals, which could go from the wistful "Barterers and Their Wives" to the full-on rock shouting of "Lazy Day" at the drop of a hat, are impressive, and he helped write three of the album's best songs, "She May Call You Up Tonight" and "I Haven't Got the Nerve," and "Shadows Breaking Over My Head." Walk Away Renee/Pretty Ballerina is hardly unusual for a rock album of the era in that most of the tracks were dominated by session musicians rather than actual bandmembers, and in many respects, this album was a triumph for the producers and arrangers (among them Steve Jerome and John Abbott, along with Lookofsky) as much as the band, but they also gave this LP a remarkably diverse feel, from the Baroque sound of the hit singles and the formal-dress psychedelia of "Shadows Breaking Over My Head," to the country-rock accents of "What Do You Know," and the straightforward rock of "Lazy Day" and "Evening Down." If the Left Banke's moment of stardom was fleeting, Walk Away Renee/Pretty Ballerina reveals, for a brief and exciting moment, they were one of the best and most innovative American bands in rock & roll.

The Left Banke Too 1968

The Left Banke - 2 in 1

The Left Banke - 2 in 1

The Left Banke had been together for less than a year when their debut single, "Walk Away Renee," became a hit, and once the band began touring steadily, they started to fracture as Michael Brown, the group's 17-year-old wunderkind, songwriter, and pianist, decided he didn't care for life on the road. By the time The Left Banke cut their second album, Brown was out of the picture, as was producer and arranger Henry Lookofsky (he was also Brown's dad), and the lineup was down to a trio: vocalist Steve Martin-Caro, guitarist/bassist Tom Finn, and drummer George Cameron. Not promising circumstances for the creation of The Left Banke Too, but surprisingly it's a fine album that shows the group's second string had plenty of talent and a sound creative vision. The album's tone differs from the debut, with fewer songs as mysterious as the lovelorn "Walk Away Renee" and "Pretty Ballerina," and a production that sounds more like intelligent sunshine pop than the leaner Baroque vision of its precursor. But with the help of outside songwriter Tom Feher, the remaining members came up with some impressive material, including the lush psychedelic pop of "There's Gonna Be a Storm" and "My Friend Today," the engaging uptempo rocker "Goodbye Holly," and a witty tale of low-budget rock star decadence, "Bryant Hotel," which features some rollicking piano and a wailing vocal from Cameron. (He and Finn both stepped up for lead vocal spots on the album, with impressive results.) Brown reconciled with his bandmates long enough to write and produce a single, and both sides were included on Left Banke Too, with "Desiree" sounding like a grander variation on the tone of the first LP. The single was a flop, and none of the songs from The Left Banke Too fared any better, but even though it proved the be the band's swan song, it's a great pop album that confirms Michael Brown wasn't the only gifted songwriter in the group. (Two songs on the album feature backing vocals from one Steve Tallarico, who several years later would tie a scarf to his mike stand, change his name to Steven Tyler, and become the lead singer with Aerosmith.)







Willie & The Red Rubber Band ‎- Willie And The Red Rubber Band (1968) & We're Coming Up (1969)

Willie & The Red Rubber Band ‎- Willie And The Red Rubber Band (1968) & We're Coming Up (1969)



Willie & The Red Rubber Band ‎- Willie And The Red Rubber Band (1968) & We're Coming Up (1969)

Willie & The Red Rubber Band ‎- Willie And The Red Rubber Band (1968) & We're Coming Up (1969)


Willie et al came out of west Texas and remind me of a cross between a jug band and the 13th Floor Elevators, or maybe Zappa if he went country, or, The Fugs if they went country. They have nothing in their oeuvre to compare to fellow Texan Roky and his 13th Floor Elevators but they are interesting as a time capsule of the era and they were certainly "playing" in the same "mind" park as Roky.
 Drums – Conley Bradford
Engineer [Recording] – Al Pachucki
Guitar – John Buck Wilken*, Lanny Fiel
Guitar, Bass – Glen Ballard (2)
Organ, Piano, Cello – Charles Addington
Photography By – Bill Berger
Piano – Begie Chruser
Producer – Chuck Sagle, Duke Niles (tracks: B6)
Vocals, Guitar – Willie Redden

The band is off the wall with a melting pot of styles which is slightly endearing. Willie et al came out of west Texas and remind me of a cross between a jug band and the 13th Floor Elevators, or maybe Zappa if he went country, or, The Fugs if they went country. They have nothing in their oeuvre to compare to fellow Texan Roky and his 13th Floor Elevators but they are interesting as a time capsule of the era and they were certainly playing in the same mind park as Roky. Trying to find anything on this band is near on impossible – but they must have had a career as this is their second album and they are on a major label (RCA). The music is a mix of rock, blues, country and soul with a dash of the avant-garde underground.  Mary Jane is their best song of their first album and Chicky – Chicky Boom Boom their greatest acid dancing hit from their second LP

Willie & The Red Rubber Band ‎- Willie And The Red Rubber Band (1968) & We're Coming Up (1969)

Willie & The Red Rubber Band ‎- Willie And The Red Rubber Band (1968) & We're Coming Up (1969)



John "Bucky” Wilkin, the son of Marijohn Wilkin (author of the country classic “Long Black Veil”), is most noted as a session guitarist on numerous country and rock records of the 1970s, particularly outlaw country releases by Waylon Jennings, Kris Kristofferson, Kinky Friedman, and Jessi Colter. He was also a songwriter and put out a little-known solo LP. Prior to his solo album, Wilkin had been in Ronny & the Daytonas, famous for their 1964 hot rod hit “Little GTO.” Wilkin was also in the American Eagles (not to be confused with the much more famous Eagles), who also included keyboardist Chuck Leavell, and put out a single in 1969.





The Victors - Victorious (1964 - 1966)

The Victors - Victorious (1964 - 1966)


By their own admission, the Victors were an ordinary teenage garage band from Minnetonka, MN; as guitarist Ron Daily puts it, "I don't think we were anything special, it was just a good time in our lives." However, the Victors did have a few brushes with greatness -- the combo ended up backing vocalist Pete Lokken on the fabled teen decadence anthem "Beer Bust Blues" by the Scotsmen, organ player Terry Knutson got to hang out with the Rolling Stones when Mick's boys played a poorly attended gig in Excelsior, MN, on their first U.S. tour in 1964, and two members of the Victors, Jim Kane and Denny Waite, later joined the Litter, one of the greatest Minnesota bands of the 1960s. While the Victors never released a record in their lifetime (except for the "Beer Bust Blues" single), Victorious collects nearly 80 minutes of demos and live tapes the group left behind, and if they aren't exactly revelatory, they are sure a lot of fun. The Victors began life as a landlocked surf band in the manner of fellow Minnesotans the Trashmen, and their takes on stuff like "Death of a Gremmie" and "Shake 'n' Stomp" display an impressive command of cheap reverb. But with time they began tackling R&B and British Invasion material, and while the Victors didn't play "Wallking the Dog," "I Ain't Gonna Eat Out My Heart Anymore," or "Midnight Hour" any better than a dozen other bands of the era, there's a naive and engaging primitive sound to the band that suggests you've walked into a time machine and ended up at a teen dance in the Midwest before LSD came along to spoil everything. The Victors' cover of "You're a Better Man Than I" also suggests they were better informed than the average teenagers of their day, and their misspelled version of "Gloria" is some sort of lost classic. Fans of authentic teenage music will love this. 

The Victors - Victorious (1964 - 1966)

The Legend - The Legend (1968)

The Legend - The Legend (1968)



Formed in California in the late-'60s, this obscure band was signed for a one-off deal with the small Encino-based Megaphone label for whom they produced this eponymous album in 1968. Shortly after, The Legend disappeared without a trace, although according to some sources the band morphed into the equally obscure Dragonfly, also on Megaphone.
Serving up a mix of poppy psych originals and a handful of inspired covers (including The Who's "The Kids Are Alright", The Troggs' "With A Girl Like You" and Bob Dylan's "Baby Blue") this album is a rare slice of early, surprisingly radio-friendly, Southern Californian psychedelia.

Members:
- Jack Duncan (bass),
- Barry Davis (drums, backing vocals),
- Gerry Jimerfield (guitar, lead vocals),
- Randy Russ (guitar, backing vocals),
- Ernie McElwaine (keyboads)


1.) With a Girl Like You (Reg Presley) - 2:17
2.) The Sky That Is Blue (B. Corso) - 2:47
3.) Zepplin's Good Friday (E. Brooks - S. Romans) - 2:42
4.) Where Oh Where Is Mother (B. Corso) - 3:03
5.) Yesterday's Child (B. Corso) - 2:31
6.) Eyes of the World (D. McGinnis) - 2:27
7.) The Kids Are Allright (Pete Townshend) - 2:53
8.) Cold Wind In August (B. Page) - 2:32
9.) Sunny Day (E. Brooks - S. Romans) - 2:11
10.) You'll Be Sorry Someday (B. Corso) - 2:41
11.) Gigi (Lerner - Loewe) - 2:17
12.) Baby Blue (Bob Dylan) - 5:27


Very rare and clean 1968 first pressing by a formidable garage band that changed their name to DRAGONFLY a year later by kicking up the volume, oh, about by 50 times.... there's some of that DRAGONFLY influence of hard fuzz psych to be found on this platter:

Originally from Colorado, the five-piece LEGEND relocated to Los Angeles and a year later became the mighty Dragonfly, who also recorded for the same "Megaphone" label.

  The material on this album largely predates the psychedelic era and is full of cover versions (The TROGGS "With A Girl Like You", Dylan's "Baby Blue" and The WHO's "The Kids Are Alright". A few cuts, like "Where Oh Where Is Mother" contain some good guitar playing with psychedelic undertones and the album ends with a little sitar solo.   Offering up a mixture of band originals and popular covers (Bob Dylan, The Troggs, The Who), musically the LP has more than its share of charms. Tracks such as 'The Sky That Is Blue', 'Zepplin's Good Friday' and 'Yesterday's Child' showcases a tasty blend of tight, Bealtesque harmonies and catchy melodies. Legend occasionally drifts close to The Left Banke ('Sunny Day' and 'Gigi'). Even more impressive is their harder rock sound, including the fuzz guitar and feedback propelled 'Where Oh Where Is Mother' and their awesome fuzz & sitar powered take on Dylan's 'Baby Blue' (with sitar fadeout). The album vanished without a trace, followed in short order by the legendary DRAGONFLY Lp. 
Their take on The Troggs hit 'With a Girl Like You' is in the same vein as the original vut comes off interesting as the lead singer seemes to have a strange accent. Great tune, with a touch of Mersybeat harmonies and there is even plenty of cowbell   'The Sky That Is Blue' is a breezy, mid-tempo pop-rock song that features some nice vox organ and wonderful group harmony vocals.   Kicked along by some wonderfully cheesy organ, 'The Sky That Is Blue' has one of those classic mid-1960s vibes - imagine something that tried to cross The Young Rascals and The Beatles. Highly infectious with some nice fuzz guitar in the background.   The album's first all-out rocker and one of the album's psych-tinged numbers, 'Where Oh Where Is Mother' is built on an intriguing mixture of fuzz guitar, electric harpsichord, weird studio sound effects, and another display of the band's impeccable harmony vocals. This was another one where the lead singer (Corso?) seemed to display a noticeable accent. 
Pulling a page out of The Beatles songbook, 'Yesterday's Child' is seemingly a stab a writing a socially relevant ballad -- Pretty, but it isn't 'Eleanor Rigby'.   Even though heavily arranged, 'Eyes of the World' is actually one of the album's most interesting performances with some wild lead guitar and an energetic lead vocals. 
While up theere with the WHO's version, their vox-powered cover of The Who's 'The Kids Are Allright' is actually quite good with some chugging drums and a nice, fuzz-drenched lead guitar. The track was issued as a single. 
One of the album's most pop-oriented efforts, 'Cold Wind In August' has a decent commercial tinge with backing harmony vocals that are nice 'Sunny Day' has a pleasant sunshine-pop feel to it with backing vocals that would have made John Phillips day. 
With the band playing at hyper-speed (sounds like they'd ingested meth amphetamines during the recording sessions ...), 'You'll Be Sorry Someday' is simply hysterical. Nice fuzz solo at the tail end of the track. 
Filled with lovely harpsichord, this one grabs attention from the opening chords. The fact that ballad 'Gigi' sounded like a Left Banke outtake does't hurt either. 
So if you're going to do a Dylan cover why not toughen it up and give it a fuzz-driven garage edge? To their credit that's exactly what these guys did on their version of 'Baby Blue'. Along with the totally bizarro sitar closing, the result is one of the album's best tracks and one of the best Dylan you'll ever hear.   With a Girl Like You The Sky That Is Blue Zepelin's Good Friday Where oh Where Is My Mother Yesterdays Child Eyes of the World II The Kids Are Allright Cold Wind in August Sunny Day You'll Be Sorry Some Day Gigi Baby Blue



The Beethoven Soul - The Beethoven Soul (1967)

The Beethoven Soul -  The Beethoven Soul (1967)


" Six piece brass band, who came from L.A. (according to Fuzz Acid and Flower), despite the Al Kooper’s   composition “New York's My Home”. 
The band formed round 1966 and release their sole –self titled- album in 1967, sounding close to psychedelic sunshine, baroque pop, sometimes flirting with more garage beats.
After their disbanded in 1970, Lambert, Lewis and Hale all went on to play together in Pollution, a late '60s L.A.-based rock band with jazz undertones. "

Andrea Kouratou – strings
Bill Powell — guitar
John Lambert – bass
Dick Lewis – brass, keyboards
Otis Hale — woodwind instruments
Terry Nu – drums, percussion

"Kind of garage-ish stuff mixed with classical elements like flute, violin and lots of harpsichord. At times the singer has a little Roger Daltry in his voice, raspy and cool."

The Beethoven Soul -  The Beethoven Soul (1967)

If you have more info on this group let know,please ...

The Cryan' Shames - Sugar & Spice (1966)

The Cryan' Shames -  Sugar & Spice (1966)


The Cryan' Shames actually were a big deal in Chicago in the mid- and late '60s, when a bunch of their singles hit the local Top Ten; some of them were small national hits as well. The biggest of these was "Sugar and Spice," a cover of a Searchers song that made the Top 50 in 1966 and was later featured in Lenny Kaye's renowned Nuggets anthology of '60s garage bands. In their original incarnation, the Shames leaned toward the pop end of garage. Borrowing heavily from the Beatles, the Byrds, and the Yardbirds, guitarist James Fairs wrote a clutch of energetic guitar pop/rockers with sparkling harmonies. After 1966, the group pursued an increasingly mainstream pop direction featuring saccharine arrangements and material. In this respect they uncannily mirrored the devolution of local rivals the New Colony Six, who also shifted from tough pop/rock to MOR in their bid for national success. But the Shames' appeal endures, partly through the efforts of reissue/archival labels such as Sundazed Records, which have kept their music available into the 21st century, and some of the original members, who have kept the band alive as a performing outfit from the 1980s onward.

They actually started out in Hinsdale, IL, as the Prowlers, a trio formed by Gerry Stone (rhythm guitar), Tom "Toad" Doody (vocals), and Dave Purple (bass, keyboards), who added guitarist James Fairs and drummer Dennis Conroy, both late of a local band from Downers Grove called the Roosters. The quintet became the Travelers, specializing in R&B and rock & roll covers, though Fairs was starting to write originals as far back as 1964. They became a sextet with the addition of Jim Pilster, a one-handed tambourine player whose artificial extremity got him dubbed "J.C. Hooke." Included in their ranks were four singers who were capable of handling lead vocals as well as harmonies, and as they already had their rock & roll and R&B sound down, they emerged as a heavyweight outfit on the local band scene, equally adept at covering the Beatles, the Byrds, or the Rolling Stones, among others. Additionally, as they discovered, Pilster's presence lent them some novelty/publicity value as "the guys with the hook," an attribute that would also benefit the Barbarians around the same time, who sported a member with a replacement appendage. According to biographer Clark Besch, they were making upwards of $180 a gig (albeit split six ways) in 1966, a good fee for a group that had never recorded. They also attracted the attention of manager Bob Monaco, who was associated with the local Destination Records label, and hoped to rectify that gap in their biography in short order.

Sugar & Spice Their new name was imposed upon them when they were notified that another band had a prior claim on "the Travelers" -- as they told Besch, the situation was described by one of the affected parties as "a cryin' shame," and that became their new name. The group and Monaco intended to make their recording debut with George Harrison's "If I Needed Someone" -- a new Beatles song not yet available in the U.S. -- but were thwarted, as the Beatles' publisher wouldn't allow the release. Instead, they grabbed up another, older British Invasion-spawned original, "Sugar and Spice," written by producer/composer Tony Hatch (under the pseudonym "Fred Nightingale") for his client group the Searchers. The number had been in the repertory of another local band, the Riddles, and they got their version out through MG Productions on a tiny local label. The resulting single, which included a proto-psychedelic Fairs original called "Ben Franklin's Almanac," became a Top Five hit locally in Chicago, and attracted the attention of Columbia Records, which bought up their contract and put the record out nationally. It easily made the Top 50 and Columbia wanted more -- the band duly obliged with "I Wanna Meet You," another Fairs original, which only made the Top Ten locally and number 65 nationally. Columbia was still interested in an album, however, and the group delivered the 12-song Sugar & Spice long-player. It was a fairly good record of its kind, mixing covers and Fairs' originals and, as it was done on a tight budget -- basically Columbia accepted the record as delivered, according to Pilster in an essay by Besch -- it also included all four single sides, plus their proposed debut of "If I Needed Someone." Although the album barely cracked the Top 200 nationally, the single and the long-player between them helped raise the band's fees more than fivefold in just a matter of weeks.
A Scratch in the Sky It all wasn't a bad beginning, and might have led to better things for the band, if it hadn't been for the Vietnam War and the military draft, which cost the Shames the services of Gerry Stone. Lenny Kerley, late of the Squires, was his replacement, and was soon partnered up as a songwriter with Fairs, generating a third single, "Mr. Unreliable," which made the Top Ten in Chicago. The Cryan' Shames continued to enjoy immense success locally in Chicago, without parallel sales in the rest of the country -- fortunately, they were not costing Columbia a great deal, and the Chicago music marketplace was important enough to keep the label interested. Their fourth single, "It Could Be We're in Love," recorded and released in the late spring of 1967, topped the local listings, without breaking through nationally. There were some lineup changes around this time, as guitarist Isaac Guillory came in on bass, taking over for Dave Purple, who was drafted that year. And a second album, entitled A Scratch in the Sky, issued in December of that year, actually sold somewhat better than their debut LP, reaching number 158 nationally; in contrast to the mix of garage punk, British Invasion, and folk-rock sounds on Sugar & Spice, A Scratch in the Sky was an ornate sunshine pop/psychedelic work, reminiscent of the Association or, perhaps, the Left Banke. The group saw a string of departures in 1968 and 1969, most notably that of James Fairs, and although the Cryan' Shames continued to record and perform with a new lineup -- featuring Saturday's Children alumnus Dave Carter on guitar and former Squires/Boston Tea Party member Alan Dawson on drums -- a lot of continuity was sacrificed. Dawson also left in late 1968, though not before contributing to their final album, Synthesis. They broke up in the last month of 1969. Since then, there have been reunion performances by various members and the formal reactivation of the group in the late '80s, which continued as of 2009.

http://www.cryanshames.com/



The Cryan' Shames -  Sugar & Spice (1966)

The Cryan' Shames' debut album was typical of the more thrown-together rock LPs of the era: both sides of their first two singles and a bunch of cover versions. The singles, actually, were pretty good, including their most well-known song, "Sugar & Spice," a cover of a Searchers hit that actually was more memorable and imaginative than the original. Its B-side, "Ben Franklin's Almanac," was a respectable original with shades of the Byrds, the Yardbirds, and California harmonies; the second single, "I Wanna Meet You," was a decent meld of Beatles-Byrds jangle with Beach Boys harmonies; and its flip, "We Could Be Happy," was an OK soft rock number. Throw in the sole original composition not from a single, "July" (one of the better 1966 Byrds sound-alikes), and you have half a decent (though not great) period pop/rock album. The problem is, though, that the cover versions that fill out the record -- including songs written and/or popularized by the Beatles, the Byrds, and the Animals, along with "Heat Wave" -- are neither too creatively done nor even imaginative selections. "Sugar and Spice" and all four of the originals appear on the Legacy compilation Sugar & Spice, which makes this album superfluous if you already have that anthology. The 2002 CD Sundazed reissue is bolstered by six bonus songs: their 1967 single "Mr. Unreliable" (different from the LP version) and its laid-back B-side "Georgia," a cover of the Beatles' "You're Gonna Lose That Girl," and three previously unreleased 1969 tracks that found them going into a mellow folk/country/soft rock direction.

The Crickets - Well... All Right (The Crickets Collection) 1992-3

The Crickets -  Well... All Right (The Crickets Collection) 1992-3


The Crickets were a group with two careers, one that lasted less than a year-and-a-half, and another that continued for decades. Originally formed by singer and guitarist Buddy Holly, drummer Jerry Allison, and bassist Joe B. Mauldin, the Crickets went from being Holly's backing musicians to a self-contained band when they re-recorded a song that Holly had already cut under his own name to avoid violating an earlier contract. The Crickets went on to a successful run of hits with Holly -- including "Maybe Baby," "Not Fade Away," and "That'll Be the Day" -- until his death in 1959. After that, the Crickets, joined by guitarist Sonny Curtis, went on to a long run recording on their own as well as backing other artists, most notably Bobby Vee and the Everly Brothers. Their first post-Holly album, In Style with the Crickets, included the original version of Curtis' song "I Fought the Law," but by the mid-'70s, they had walked away from recording and primarily performed live, especially after the 1978 film The Buddy Holly Story revived interest in their former frontman. The Crickets came back in 1988 with T Shirt, which was produced in part by longtime fan Paul McCartney, and 2004's The Crickets & Their Buddies found them covering their classics with help from Eric Clapton, Waylon Jennings, John Prine, Graham Nash, and many more.
The "Crickets" started out as a ruse. In 1956, Buddy Holly signed a contract with Decca Records, but after two sessions in Nashville, no one was happy with the results, and Holly and Decca parted ways. After finding a more sympathetic producer in Norman Petty, Holly, Jerry Allison, and Joe B. Mauldin decamped to Petty's studio in Clovis, New Mexico, and, among other things, cut a new version of one of Holly's Decca efforts, "That'll Be the Day." Coral Records was interested in Holly's Clovis recordings, but the terms of the Decca contract meant he couldn't re-record "That'll Be the Day" under his own name, so the new version was credited to the Crickets. The Crickets' "That'll Be the Day" became a Number One hit in 1957, and for the next 15 months, there were records by the Crickets and records by Buddy Holly -- which were virtually interchangeable -- and on-stage they were billed as Buddy Holly & the Crickets. By the end of 1958, however, the references to "Buddy Holly & the Crickets" were becoming valid in the worst possible way. Holly's shifting and expanding musical interests, coupled with his move to New York and marriage to Maria Elena Santiago, and the differing relationships that the three had with Petty, who was now their manager, led to a split between Holly and his bandmates in the months immediately prior to Holly's death in a plane crash on February 3, 1959.

The result of their split was a separate existence for the Crickets. Jerry Allison became the de facto leader of the group, and they were soon a quartet, with Sonny Curtis on guitar and Earl Sinks as lead singer. In 1959, still managed and produced by Norman Petty, they recorded "Love's Made a Fool of You" backed with "Someone, Someone," which failed to chart. Their next serious assault on the charts -- a version of Curtis' "I Fought the Law" cut for Coral Records -- vanished without a trace in 1959, and their rendition of "More Than I Can Say" also failed to find an audience for them, though it did wonders for Bobby Vee (and, by extension, for Curtis as its composer). They recorded a handful of singles for Coral Records, and later signed to Liberty Records with Jerry Naylor in the lead singer spot (sometimes switching off with Curtis), in addition to recording with Buddy Holly soundalike Bobby Vee.

The group recorded for Liberty for four years, from 1961 through 1965, even doing their versions of several Beatles songs, but apart from a pair of minor hits, "My Little Girl" and "Please Don't Ever Change," were unable to generate any enthusiasm. One of Naylor's successors, David Box, died in a plane crash in 1964. They did find some lingering success in England, where they headlined shows as well as serving as a backing band for the Everly Brothers, and the group even managed to appear in two jukebox movies on either side of the Atlantic, Just for Fun (1963) in England (doing "My Little Girl" and "Teardrops Feel Like Rain") and The Girls on the Beach (1965) in America (doing "La Bamba"). By the end of the '60s, Mauldin had left music while Allison was singing lead; he and Curtis were also working as session musicians, and Curtis scored a huge success at the dawn of the '70s as the composer of "Love Is All Around," the theme song for The Mary Tyler Moore Show.

Too Much Monday MorningAllison and Curtis were the core of the group in the early '70s, mostly working as a touring act rather than a recording outfit, though new records did appear on various labels, including Mercury and MCA. In the wake of the revival of interest in Holly's music at the end of the '70s, thanks in part to the 1978 movie The Buddy Holly Story, the Crickets re-formed on a steady basis, with Joe B. Mauldin returning to the lineup after more than a decade out of music. In 1986, Curtis left the fold to re-establish himself as a solo performer, and was replaced by Gordon Payne on vocals. In 1988, they recorded the single "T-Shirt," produced by noted fan Paul McCartney, which became a minor hit and led to the release of an LP of the same name from Epic Records. The British label Carlton Records issued Too Much Monday Morning in 1996, which included guest vocals from Texas country-folk artist Nanci Griffith. In 2004, the Crickets released The Crickets & their Buddies, in which they re-recorded a number of their Holly-era hits with notable guest stars, among them Eric Clapton, John Prine, Rodney Crowell, Graham Nash, Bobby Vee, and Waylon Jennings (whose contribution was recorded shortly before his death). After the death of Joe B. Mauldin in 2015 and the advancing age of the other Crickets, the band faded away from both recording and live work, but a steady flow of archival reissues and the group's induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2012 kept their music and memory alive. In 2018, the British Not Now label issued The Crickets Story, which collected the group's complete recordings from 1957 to 1962

The Crickets -  Well... All Right (The Crickets Collection) 1992-3



The Baskerville Hounds - Featuring Space Rock, Part 2 (1967)The Left Banke - 2 in 1Willie & The Red Rubber Band ‎- Willie And The Red Rubber Band (1968) & We're Coming Up (1969)The Victors - Victorious (1964 - 1966)The Legend - The Legend (1968)The Beethoven Soul -  The Beethoven Soul (1967)The Cryan' Shames -  Sugar & Spice (1966)The Crickets -  Well... All Right (The Crickets Collection) 1992-3

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