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Sandy Nelson - Golden Hits & The Best Of The Beats


Sandy Nelson was the biggest -- and one of the few -- star drummers of the late '50s and early '60s era in which instrumental rock was at its peak. He landed two Top Ten hits, "Teen Beat" (1959) and "Let There Be Drums" (1961), which surrounded his Gene Krupa-inspired solos with cool, mean guitar licks that were forerunners of the surf sound. Nelson had only one other Top 40 hit, "Drums Are My Beat" (1962). He ground out a quick series of instrumental albums in the early '60s -- eight within 18 months, as a matter of fact -- with several other top Hollywood rock and pop session musicians. Nelson was not that great a drummer, although he was good. His principal importance is that he found a place for drum rock solos in hit instrumental singles, and the more reckless elements of his style no doubt influenced other musicians, such as surf drummers and, later, Keith Moon.

Nelson started to play rock & roll as a teenager in Los Angeles in the 1950s, forming a group that included Jan Berry, Dean Torrence, and Bruce Johnston, all of whom would be important to the surf and hot rod scenes a few years down the line. By the late '50s he was playing sessions, including drums on the Teddy Bears' chart-topper "To Know Him Is to Love Him." After his "Teen Beat" became a hit for Original Sound in 1959, he signed with Imperial as a solo artist, and continued to work as a session musician. For instance, he's heard on Gene Vincent records of the time, as well as the Hollywood Argyles' big hit "Alley Oop," on which he also did some screams. Nelson's numerous solo albums, despite the assistance of top fellow sessioneers like Steve Douglas (sax), Ernie Freeman (piano), and Rene Hall (guitar), had a lot of basic and unimaginative instrumental rock, whether original material or covers of well-known hits of the day. As with Duane Eddy's recordings, however, these simple albums might have helped inspire aspiring musicians as things to play along and learn with, if nothing else.

Near the end of 1963, Nelson was involved in a serious motorcycle accident that necessitated amputation of his right foot and part of his leg. Nonetheless, he managed to resume his drumming career and continued to churn out albums, as well as some singles, of which "Casbah" (1965) is the highlight, with its wild splashing drums and frenetic Middle Eastern/surf guita

Sandy Nelson - Golden Hits & The Best Of The Beats

Sandy Nelson - Golden Hits & The Best Of The Beats

Sandy Nelson - Golden Hits & The Best Of The Beats
  
Golden Hits & The Best Of The Beats (1997)

Although their titles seem to suggest best-of compilations, both Golden Hits and Best of the Beats are simply two more entries in a long line of Sandy Nelson records cut in response to the chart blockbusters of the moment. These LPs live or die on their relative compatibility with Nelson's strengths and sensibilities, and each of these 12-song efforts is a significant cut above average thanks to the inclusion of several R&B classics that afford the drummer the chance to cut loose. (Their similarities also make them more compatible than many of the pairings on See for Miles' other Sandy Nelson two-fers.) Nelson clearly savors the verve and creativity of Golden Hits covers like Wilbert Harrison's "Kansas City," Bill Doggett's "Honky Tonk," and Fats Domino's "Walking to New Orleans," and his drum solos exhibit an unusual finesse, complementing the melodies instead of overpowering them. The Best of the Beats is even better. The loosey-goosey energy of the New Orleans party classics "Ooh Poo Pah Doo" and "Mother-in-Law" proves particularly well matched to the chaotic abandon of Nelson's rhythms, and he also captures the Latin-flavored verve of the Ritchie Valens hits "Let's Go" and "La Bamba." Best of all are the back-to-back Elvis Presley covers "All Shook Up" and "Don't Be Cruel," which pay implicit homage to D.J. Fontana, the King's longtime sideman and arguably the first truly great rock & roll drummer. 

Sandy Nelson - Golden Hits & The Best Of The Beats

VA - American Heartbeat - The '60s

VA - American Heartbeat - The '60s

VA - American Heartbeat - The '60s (2018)

VA - American Heartbeat - The '60s

"...If variety is the spice of life, then listening to American radio during the early part of the 1960s was certainly a spicy experience! Legend has it that the period covered by these 3CDs was a low point in pop, roughly bordered by Elvis enlisting in the Army in 1958, and the American breakthrough of The Beatles in 1964. But even the briefest look at these titles - or the quickest of listens, will disprove that legend. Here is a delicious menu of dance sensations, virtuoso instrumentals, novelty hits, heart-breaking ballads together with some of the perkiest pop you could wish for..."

Track List:

Disc 1

1. Only The Lonely ~ Roy Orbison
2. The Locomotion ~ Little Eva
3. Chain Gang ~ Sam Cooke
4. Cathy's Clown ~ The Everly Brothers
5. Runaway ~ Del Shannon
6. Return To Sender ~ Elvis Presley
7. Green Onions ~ Booker T. & The M.G.’s
8. Soldier Boy ~ The Shirelles
9. Hey! Baby ~ Bruce Channel
10. Hit The Road, Jack ~ Ray Charles
11. The Lion Sleeps Tonight (Wimoweh) ~ The Tokens
12. All Alone Am I ~ Brenda Lee
13. Runaround Sue ~ Dion
14. Everybody's Somebody's Fool ~ Connie Francis
15. He's A Rebel ~ The Crystals
16. Big Bad John ~ Jimmy Dean
17. Mother-In-Law ~ Ernie K-Doe
18. Big Girls Don't Cry ~ The Four Seasons
19. Travelin' Man ~ Ricky Nelson
20. Good Timin' ~ Jimmy Jones
21. A Hundred Pounds Of Clay ~ Gene McDaniels
22. He'll Have To Go ~ Jim Reeves
23. Take Good Care Of My Baby ~ Bobby Vee
24. Poetry In Motion ~ Johnny Tillotson
25. Johnny Angel ~ Shelley Fabares

Disc 2

1. Good Luck Charm ~ Elvis Presley
2. Sealed With A Kiss ~ Brian Hyland
3. Running Bear ~ Johnny Preston
4. Because They're Young ~ Duane Eddy
5. El Paso ~ Marty Robbins
6. Tossin' And Turnin' ~ Bobby Lewis
7. Breaking Up Is Hard To Do ~ Neil Sedaka
8. Puppy Love ~ Paul Anka
9. Shop Around ~ The Miracles
10. Way Down Yonder In New Orleans ~ Freddie Cannon
11. Roses Are Red ~ Bobby Vinton
12. Do You Love Me ~ The Contours
13. I Like It Like That (Part 1) ~ Chris Kenner
14. Sixteen Reasons ~ Connie Stevens
15. The Mountain's High ~ Dick & Dee Dee
16. Blue Moon ~ The Marcels
17. Peppermint Twist (Part 1) ~ Joey Dee & The Starliters
18. Save The Last Dance For Me ~ The Drifters
19. Burning Bridges ~ Jack Scott
20. Moody River ~ Pat Boone
21. Stay ~ Maurice Williams
22. I Know (You Don't Love Me No More) ~ Barbara George
23. Teen Angel ~ Mark Dinning
24. Sink The Bismark ~ Johnny Horton
25. Only Love Can Break A Heart ~ Gene Pitney

Disc 3

1. The Wanderer ~ Dion
2. Sherry ~ The Four Seasons
3. Ramblin' Rose~ Nat King Cole
4. Quarter To Three ~ Gary U.S. Bonds
5. Sheila ~ Tommy Roe
6. Fool No.1 ~ Brenda Lee
7. It's Now Or Never (O Sole Mio) ~ Elvis Presley
8. The Stripper ~ David Rose
9. Duke Of Earl ~ Gene Chandler
10. Bobby's Girl ~ Marcie Blane
11. Michael (Row The Boat Ashore) ~ The Highwaymen
12. Walk Don't Run ~ The Ventures
13. Handy Man ~ Jimmy Jones
14. The Twist ~ Chubby Checker
15. Alley-Oop ~ Hollywood Argyles
16. Raindrops ~ Dee Clark
17. Last Night ~ The Mar-Keys
18. Monster Mash ~ Bobby Pickett & The Crypt-Kickers
19. Please Mr. Postman ~ The Marvelettes
20. (Theme From) A Summer Place ~ Percy Faith
21. I Can't Stop Loving You ~ Ray Charles
22. Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow ~ The Shirelles
23. Crying ~ Roy Orbison
24. Mashed Potato Time ~ Dee Dee Sharp
25. Last Date ~ Floyd Cramer 


The Beau Brummels - Magic Hollow (1964-1968)

The Beau Brummels - Magic Hollow (1964-1968)

The Beau Brummels - Magic Hollow 2005

Magic Hollow is a box set compilation by The Beau Brummels comprising 113 songs recorded between 1964-1968, including hit singles, demos, outtakes, rarities and previously unissued material. The set was released on June 21, 2005 by Rhino Handmade
As a four-CD, 113-track collection of 1960s Beau Brummels recordings (nothing is included from their post-'60s reunions), Magic Hollow is an excellent overview of the career of one of the finest and most underrated American bands. There's a good balance between their most familiar material (including all of their hits) and rarities, 42 of the tracks seeing release here for the first time (though some of those are alternate versions). True, some die-hard fans of the group would have welcomed a Bear Family-styled no-stones-unturned box set, as for all this set's length, there are several CD's worth of cuts that don't appear here. Some of the Triangle album is missing, most of Bradley's Barn is absent, and there are a wealth of missing unreleased-in-the-'60s tracks that have shown up on other Beau Brummels comps. But if a four-CD size limitation had to be imposed, this is about as good as could be hoped for, chronologically sequenced so as to gracefully trace their evolution from the first truly fine American British Invasion-inspired band to folk-rock and country-rock innovators. For those who've collected the Beau Brummels for a while, the most attention-grabbing items will be the rarities, which are both plentiful and usually of surprisingly high quality. "People Are Cruel," a September, 1964 recording of a previously unheard Ron Elliott original (even pre-dating their signing to Autumn Records), has their excellent haunting British Invasion-style melodies and vocal harmonies already in place; the backing track "Here I Am in Love Again," sadly missing vocals, has an intriguingly complex, beguiling tune; "Darkness" is a fine Elliott solo demo from 1965. Though their Autumn era is heavily represented by two full CDs of music, there are less previously unreleased cuts on the set from the mid-'60s than there are from their stint at Warner Brothers in 1966-68, and discs three and four really pour on the vault discoveries. Disc three alone has a bunch of previously unissued Sal Valentino compositions that further prove him to be a fine composer in his own right, even if he was overshadowed by primary Beau Brummels writer Elliott. A wealth of early 1967 outtakes (including some solo Valentino demos, highlighted by "Only Dreaming Now" and "Magic Hollow" itself) show them moving toward the more sophisticated feel of Triangle, though without as orchestrated a sound. Disc four, in addition to containing much of Triangle and some of Bradley's Barn, rounds off the picture of their journey into countrified folk-rock with another generous helping of outtakes, demos, and alternates that are in most respects up to the level of the music they officially released between late 1967 and late 1968. Also, it should be noted that Magic Hollow contains all of the band's non-LP single sides from their Warner Brothers era, some of which have been fiendishly hard to find since the '60s. It's all iced with a fine, 48-page booklet, jam-packed with photos, track information, and extensive interview quotes with bandmembers that bring much of their less-documented history to light.

The Beau Brummels - Magic Hollow (1964-1968)

The Beau Brummels - Magic Hollow (1964-1968)

Thanks Cor !

****

The Royal Teens - Let's Rock (Complete Recording)

The Royal Teens - Let's Rock (Complete Recording)




The Royal Teens were a New Jersey rock and roll band that formed in 1956, consisting of Bob Gaudio on piano, Tom Austin on drums, Billy Dalton on guitar, and Billy Crandall on saxophone. They are best known for their single "Short Shorts", which was a #3 hit in the United States in 1958. The follow-up single, 1959's "Believe Me", hit #26. They never recorded an album, and broke up in 1965. The term "Short Shorts" was a description Bob Gaudio and Tom Austin had given to the cutoff jeans teenage girls were wearing during the summer of 1957. On that musically fateful afternoon, Gaudio and Austin were driving up Washington Avenue in Bergenfield, New Jersey in Tom Austin's red and white 1957 Ford Fairlane 500, trying to figure out what to call the latest song they had written for their Rock and Roll band then known as The Royals. ...



The Royal Teens - Let's Rock (Complete Recording)

ORIGINAL ROYAL TEENS

Bob Gaudio (Piano): The youngest member of The Royal Teens, Bob Gaudio, began playing piano at age eight. Like most kids, Bob hated to practice, but soon found that the piano presented enough of an interesting challenge and he soon looked forward to his sessions with the keyboard. Throughout his time performing with the group, Bob studied piano privately under the tutelage of famed Sal Mosca. He co-wrote The Royal Teens’ Number Three hit “Short Shorts” with bandmate Tom Austin. Following his success with The Royal Teens, Bob became an original member of The Four Seasons.

Larry Qualiano (Saxophone): A gifted musician to the extreme, Larry Qualiano held an important berth with the Royal Teens with his amazing versatility: Larry played the tenor, alto and baritone saxophone(s), “legitimate” clarinet and the flute.
Bill Dalton (Guitar): Beginning formal music studies in his early teens, Bill was attracted to the guitar from watching countless cowboy movies. Discovering his grandfather’s old guitar in the cellar of his home, Bill put the dilapidated instrument into playing condition and found that he could strum away to his heart’s content. Besides the guitar, Bill also performed on the bass whenever necessary.

Tom Austin (Drums): Tom’s entry into the music world began as a boy when his uncle, a professional drummer, once left his traps and equipment at the Austin house, and the Tom began playing. He was eventually offered a job to play with a small combo at a local (New Jersey) Police Athletic League (PAL) affair. That started his professional ball rolling, and Tom continued to play with various groups throughout his high school career—while studying under Irwin “Russ” Russo. As a member of The Royal Teens, Tom co-wrote the group’s big hit “Short Shorts” with bandmate Bob Gaudio.


The Royal Teens - Let's Rock (Complete Recording)


The Royal Teens are, by one definition, a hard-luck band. They could play hard and loud, but they also sang well and knew how to harmonize. They were one of the better rock & roll bands of their period, nicely self-contained and with a great beat and hard attack on their instruments, which included sax, electric guitar, and piano. But for all of that, they're virtually a one-hit group, and that one hit, "Short Shorts," isn't too representative of their sound. And, yet, without it, it's unlikely that a version of The Royal Teens would still get gigs in the Northeast in the summer of 1999, 40 years after the group's last decent chart placement.
Bill Crandle, Bill Dalton, Tom Austin, and Bob Gaudio formed the original band, then known as the Royal Tones, in Fort Lee, NJ in 1957. Crandall left the band and was replaced on sax by Larry Qualiano, and in 1958, Joe Francovilla (aka Joey Villa) joined the lineup as singer. A name change followed to The Royal Teens, when they got a shot at recording on the tiny Power Records label. Their first two singles, "Sitting with My Baby" and "Mad Gas," didn't chart, and they were in the process of cutting a couple of new singles in 1958 when their producer, against the wishes of the band, decided to use some leftover studio time to cut an instrumental jam that they'd done on-stage, to which they'd improvised some words. So the story goes, a couple of girls hanging around the studio were brought in and told to repeat the same line at the designated spots in the song, as the band sang and played.
Out of that session, "Short Shorts" was born, which, after initial success in New York City, Power quickly sold to the ABC-Paramount label. With help from American Bandstand and lots of radio stations that jumped on the song, "Short Shorts" spread quickly over the airwaves, and the band suddenly had a number three national hit. The record, often perceived as one of the dumbest of novelty tunes, is actually better than most people remember it, and has everything a great rock & roll song needs to transcend its simplicity -- the sax part is thick with places for the soloist to have fun, there's a hot guitar break, and the beat is relentless and intoxicating, especially as punctuated by the honking sax, a song you can laugh at, dance to, and play variations on for five minutes or more. (If Lenny & the Squigtones had really wanted to generate a hit in the late '70s, they'd have cut "Short Shorts" with Penny Marshall and Cindy Williams, or their soundalikes, backing Michael McKean and David Lander).
Unfortunately, The Royal Teens were never able to follow it up with anything remotely as popular. "Harvey's Got a Girl Friend" charted very low, and "My Kind of Dream" stiffed, after which the group left ABC-Paramount. A short stay on the Mighty Records label, and a similar lack of success, brought them to Capitol, where they made the Top 30 in 1959 with the romantic, doo wop style number "Believe Me." That was their last chart record, however, and also the last record on which Bob Gaudio played -- he exited The Royal Teens and soon hooked up with a singer named Frankie Valli, together forming the Four Lovers, soon to become the Four Seasons.
The Royal Teens spent the next few years bouncing between labels, including Jubilee, Blue Jay, and Swan, and still appeared on shows like American Bandstand occasionally, even as their membership slowly shifted. Al Kooper spent much of 1959 playing guitar with The Royal Teens before moving on to much bigger things. They still cut good sides, and they were even adaptable to the doo wop vocal sound; in fact, as "Believe Me" (which sounds more like Dion & The Belmonts than Dion & The Belmonts did) proves, they were better at it than a lot of bands, and they still came up with great riffs and bracing solos (check out the guitar break on "All Right Baby"). But not even follow-ups like "Little Trixie," patterned after "Short Shorts," or pure exploitation like "Short Shorts Twist," could crack the charts for them again.
The group has continued in some form into the '90s, however, partly with help from the use of "Short Shorts" in a commercial for Nair, and the original record's continued popularity on oldies radio and in compilations. Those who've heard their other records, however, also know that this band had a lot more to offer, and may still.


The Royal Teens feat. Joe Villa - Let's Rock! Complete Recording


The Royal Teens - Let's Rock (Complete Recording)




The Royal Flairs - Rare Recordings From 1965-66



 Originally from Council Bluffs, Iowa, the Royal Flairs began as the backing band for singer Dick Hodge, cutting one single at Sears Sound Studio in Omaha, Nebraska, “Dream Angel” / “Let’s Go”, in October of 1962 as Nelson Royal, Bobby Williams and the Royal Flairs*.
The Flairs became house band at the Milrose Ballroom outside of Omaha, playing primarily surf instrumentals.


Three members stayed with the band through all of their changes: Bob Everhart (Bob Williams’ actual name) on sax and vocals, Dave Krivolavek on guitar and Dave Brubeck on bass. Other early members included Jerry Fleetwood on trumpet, Daryl Hill on organ, Brian Sallozo on sax, Brad Starr and Mike Nelson on lead guitar, and Rick Brown on drums.

Everhart, Brubeck and Krivolavek relocated to Chicago in early 1965, adding Mike Donian on drums and Mel Matthews on lead guitar and organ. In 1966 they cut two 45s for the Marina label, one as the Royal Flairs, and another as the Unlimited.

The first, “Suicide” has a sharp garage sound and a great solo. In the lyrics the singer wants to join the girl who killed herself over him. It was written by Everhart and Dave Krivolavek, with Everhart playing the harmonica. The instrumental flip, “One Pine Box” (misprinted on the label as “One Pink Box”) has an earlier surf style. It’s a gruesome number featuring the sound of scraping and a hammer nailing a coffin lid shut.

The second Marina 45 as The Unlimited was another morbid number “Feelings.” The flip was one I haven’t heard yet, “Gone Away”.

Bobby Williams remained a pseudonym for Bob Everhart as that name appears as the promotional contact on their Marina 45. For the Flairs final 45, they released the folky “Hat On Tie” as by Bobby and Dave on one side, and the killer soul screamer “My Baby Cries” as by Bobby Williams on the other. These were produced by D. Marrone for the Tonorous label.


According to the notes from Back from the Grave, the band broke up after Bob Everhart was shot when he tried to protect a 350 pound go-go dancer named Miss Temptation from a crazed patron. Bob survived the wound but decided to get out of the nightclubs while he was still in one piece!

In the 1980’s an EP Surfin’ with the Royal Flairs featured five unreleased versions of surf songs recorded in 1962. Another LP, The Royal Flairs, Rare Recordings from 1965-66 contains their singles along with a side of unreleased songs that reflect their change to r&b and British Invasion sounds, recorded in Omaha.

*The Routers cut a version of “Let’s Go” in 1962. Bob Everhart filed a complaint with BMI over the copyright of “Let’s Go”, which caused SAM owner Leona Leivas to release the copyright. However, a 1973 European Warner Brothers release of “Let’s Go” shows song writing credits to Lanny Duncan and Robert Duncan.





The Golliwogs - Fight Fire - The Complete Recordings 1964-1967

The Golliwogs - Fight Fire - The Complete Recordings 1964-1967


What's in a name? More than any other band, the Golliwogs suggest a group's handle really can make a difference, since they labored in obscurity for three years before achieving massive success months after the quartet changed its name to Creedence Clearwater Revival. The Golliwogs' story began when singer and guitarist John Fogerty met drummer Doug Clifford while they were attending high school in El Cerrito, California; they discovered they shared a passion for Little Richard and Fats Domino, and decided to form a band to play New Orleans-style rock & roll. After several months, Fogerty and Clifford recruited Stu Cook, another El Cerrito student, to handle piano and bass guitar with their combo. Initially called the Blue Velvets, the group gave star billing to John's older brother when he came aboard as lead vocalist and guitarist. In 1961, Tommy Fogerty & the Blue Velvets released a pair of singles for the Oakland, California-based label Orchestra Records, but neither was a success.

In 1963, Fantasy Records, a jazz label based out of San Francisco, enjoyed a surprise hit single with Vince Guaraldi's piano tune "Cast Your Fate to the Wind," and when a local television station aired a documentary about the record's success, the Blue Velvets approached Fantasy in hopes of landing a new record deal. Fantasy co-owner Max Weiss saw potential in the group and signed them up, but believed they needed a new name, and after toying with the Visions, Weiss and his associates declared the band would now be known as the Golliwogs. The Golliwogs released their first single on Fantasy, "Don't Tell Me No Lies" b/w "Little Girl (Does Your Momma Know)," in November 1964; the disc made no impression on the charts, and while the Golliwogs would cut six other singles for Fantasy and their affiliated Scorpio label (including an early version of CCR's "Walking on the Water"), the only chart success the band saw was with their song "Brown Eyed Girl" (an original, not the venerable Van Morrison number), which rose to number ten on Billboard's "Regional Breakout" chart for Miami, Florida.

Nuggets: Original Artyfacts from the First Psychedelic Era 1965-1968 While Tommy Fogerty co-wrote and sang many of the Golliwogs' early singles, as time passed his brother John became more of a presence in the group, taking a larger role in the recording process and even producing their final sessions. The final Golliwogs single, "Porterville" b/w "Call It Pretending," appeared in late 1967, and the band was offered a new deal with Fantasy under the condition they once again change their name (no great hardship, as they were never very enthusiastic about being called the Golliwogs anyway). The group came up with Creedence Clearwater Revival, and their debut album (which included new versions of both "Porterville" and "Walking on the Water") appeared in July 1968; CCR's versions of "Suzie Q" and "I Put a Spell on You" were both solid hits, and at long last the quartet was a success. In 1974, after Creedence Clearwater Revival broke up, Fantasy released a collection of Golliwogs material under the name Pre-Creedence, and in 1998 their song "Fight Fire" got some belated respect when it appeared on the celebrated garage rock box set Nuggets: Original Artyfacts from the First Psychedelic Era 1965-1968. Golliwogs tracks were also part of the complete Creedence Clearwater Revival box set released in 2001, and Fantasy finally issued a definitive collection of the group's body of work, Fight Fire: The Complete Recordings 1964-1967, in 2017.

The Golliwogs - Fight Fire - The Complete Recordings 1964-1967

Before Creedence Clearwater Revival were the chart-topping, era-defining band they went on to be, John Fogerty, his brother Tom, Stu Cook, and Doug Clifford had been struggling to make an impact for almost a decade. After playing in various bands that didn't make much of a splash, their mid-'60s incarnation as the Golliwogs found the group kicking out some seriously good garage rock, snappy Beat group knock-offs, and quite a few songs that pointed towards CCR. The band started off in 1964 with Tom and John sharing lead vocals on songs like "I Only Met You Just an Hour Ago" and "You Got Nothing on Me," amiable Beatles-inspired songs that make up for their lack of originality with a healthy dose of teenage energy and occasionally strike gold, like on the moody "Don't Tell Me No Lies." Once John took over on vocals and asserted his songwriting skills, things started to get more interesting. In 1965/1966 they started working on their own sound and in the process made some great garage rock. "Brown-Eyed Girl" is a dark, rumbling, minor-key rocker that Them would have been glad to have in their set; "Fight Fire" is a monster rocker with some fiery guitar riffing, and the garage ballad/rocker hybrid "Try Try Try" would have been a highlight of a Nuggets comp. By the time late 1966 hit, the band was starting to tap into something unique and that fall's single "Walking on the Water" is a weird, one-chord song where the transition to the dark blues of CCR really begins. It's in the power of John's vocal, the clipped guitar playing, and the brutal drive of the rhythm section. From that point on the band went from a traditional garage band to something a little fuller and more expressive. The songs they recorded in 1967 show a new level of confidence and richness, with John coming into his own as a songwriter and the band starting to capture the tightly wound toughness they became known for. Tracks like the soulful "Tell Me" or the rollicking "Porterville" (which CCR ended up re-doing later) basically sound like Creedence, and good Creedence at that. The Golliwogs work has been compiled before, on LP in the '70s and as part of a CCR box set in 2001, but this is the first time their complete works have been showcased as a whole under their own name. It may have been down to legal issues or perceived lack of interest that it hasn't happened until now, but the important thing is that it has finally happened and fans of CCR, John Fogerty, and good old-fashioned garage rock can be glad of it.

The Boys Next Door - The Boys Next Door





 Although the Boys Next Door's craftily arranged and produced sound was extremely derivative of the Beach Boys and other mid-'60s Southern California acts like Jan & Dean and Gary Lewis, this is a solid and fun collection of their singles (the earliest of which were billed to the Four Wheels) and unreleased cuts. It's also more sonically diverse than many '60s groups with obvious influences are, from the straight-up hot rod sounds of "Cold 45" (a cop of the Beach Boys' "409") to "Mandy" (which crosses the BBs' "Little Deuce Coupe" with the production of more sophisticated tunes like "The Little Girl I Once Knew"). To hammer home the Beach Boys comparison even more, "I Could See Me Dancing with You" owes a lot to the BBs' cover of "Do You Wanna Dance?" "Why Be Proud"/"Suddenly She Was Gone" explores a moodier vein, and there's an obscure Al Kooper co-composition, "There Is No Greater Sin." No, this music is not deep or lost genius. But not every unearthed batch of sounds from the mid-'60s has to be to be worth hearing.

The Boys Next Door - The Boys Next Door

Glad - Feelin' Glad (1968)

Glad - Feelin' Glad (1968)


Pre-Poco-pre-Eagles act Glad was the natural continuation of The New Breed (no members left). Their sole 1969's album is in the flower power/soft psychedelic style, complete with rich harmonies and heavy orchestration.
When the band folded Timothy Bruce Schmidt achieved international success first with Poco and then with the Eagles. Tom Phillips, George Hullin & Ron Floegel regrouped to form Redwing who released a string of albums throughout the 1970`s and beyond.


In 1966, under their own label, World United, The New Breed recorded a new single, "Fine With Me" b/w "The Sound of Music."  The band's music mirrored the progressive changes that were happening in the music world around this time, and their follow-up single "Wand Ad Reader," was, essentially, a New Breed re-write of  "Paperback Writer."

Around 1968, the band signed on with a new label, Equinox, under producer Terry Melcher, who had the group change their name to Glad.  

Members:
Ron Floegel — guitar, vocals
Tom Phillips — guitar, vocals
Timothy B. Schmit — bass, vocals
George Hullin — drums, vocals

In Los Angeles, Glad recorded one album, Feelin' Glad.  The album, again, is very Beatlesque, but it is a highly produced effort, more so like the post-'65 Beatles.  Apparently, the band was unhappy with the album due to the fact that they had very little control over it.  Certain parts of the record were overdubbed with strings, horns, and fancy production against the band's wishes.  Furthermore, its been stated that Tim Schmit is the only Glad member that appeared on the LP's track, "Shape of Things to Come," and this was apparently a sore spot for the group.  Regardless, the album, which is mostly Glad originals, is a solid album filled with great cuts and great singing and harmonies.
Unfortunately, Feelin' Glad did not sell particularly well, and in 1969, Tim Schmit, aka, Timothy B. Schmit was offered the position of bassist for Poco . He accepted it and went onto record some of the most under appreciated music ever with the band.  He became the replacement for Randy Meisner, who, ironically, he would replace again in the Eagles in 1977.  With Poco, Tim released 11 albums.

Glad, again, changed their name.  This time, they became Redwing....




Glad - Feelin' Glad (1968)


Glad - Feelin' Glad (1968)


The Castaways - Liar, Liar (Best of the Castaways) USA






Best remembered for their garage-rock perennial "Liar Liar," the Castaways formed in 1962 around the nucleus of guitarist Roy Hensley, bassist Dick Roby and drummer Denny Craswell; originally founded simply to perform at a fraternity party, the group proved such a smashing success that it remained an ongoing concern, expanding to a quintet with the subsequent additions of lead guitarist Bob Folschow and keyboardist Jim Donna. The Castaways' lone hit, "Liar Liar" was written by Donna and released on the Soma label in 1965, reaching the number 12 slot on the U.S. charts on the strength of its inimitable echo-drenched vocals and wheezing keyboards. A series of follow-up efforts flopped, however, and despite an appearance in the 1967 film It's a Bikini World, the Castaways' career ground to a halt, although the band often performed live in the decades to follow.

The Castaways are a rock and roll band based in Minnesota that have been playing concerts, parties and weddings for years. Jim Donna (keyboards and vocals) is one of the original members of the band. It was his composition, Liar Liar that not only became a million selling song and landed in the top 10, but a song Robert credits as being influential to the sound of his then group, the Band of Joy. 

Bob Donna later joined the band on guitar and vocals with Rick Snider on drums and vocals, and Ralph Hintz on bass and vocals. In 2005 Jim Donna was inducted into the Minnesota Rock/Country Hall of Fame.

Their music has a high energy lively dance beat blended with the soul sounds of The Righteous Brothers. Their song selection runs the gamut of pop and classic rock, ballads to 50s and 60s favorites. 



One of the great one-hit wonders of the mid-'60s, the Castaways  with a catchy, garage sound best exemplified by their lone national hit, "Liar Liar." This 22-track anthology takes listeners through the band's entire history, right up to the present time, including a "Liar Liar 2000" remake. Along the way, the band goes through the customary stylistic changes (from garage to Beatles cops to soul to psychedelia) in search of that elusive second hit that most bands go through, trying new styles to fit the changing times until coming full circle back to their original sound. Great notes on the band's history and the new cuts brings a nice sense of closure to the package. 


The Surfaris - 2 in 1 (Hit City'65 & It Ain't Me Babe)

The Surfaris - 2 in 1 (Hit City'65 & It Ain't Me Babe)

A Glendora, CA, surf group remembered for "Wipe Out," the number two 1963 hit that ranks as one of the great rock instrumentals, featuring a classic up-and-down guitar riff and a classic solo drum roll break, both of which were emulated by millions (the number is no exaggeration) of beginning rock & rollers. They recorded an astonishing number of albums (about half a dozen) and singles in the mid-'60s; the "Wipe Out" follow-up, "Point Panic," was the only one to struggle up to the middle of the charts. The Surfaris were not extraordinary, but they were more talented than the typical one-shot surf group; drummer Ron Wilson was praised by session stickman extraordinaire Hal Blaine, and his uninhibited splashing style sounds like a direct ancestor to Keith Moon. He also took the lead vocals on the group's occasional Beach Boys imitations.



The Surfaris - 2 in 1 (Hit City'65 & It Ain't Me Babe)


The Surfaris - 2 in 1 (Hit City'65 & It Ain't Me Babe)


Sandy Nelson - Golden Hits & The Best Of The BeatsVA - American Heartbeat - The '60sThe Beau Brummels - Magic Hollow (1964-1968)The Royal Teens - Let's Rock (Complete Recording)The Royal Flairs - Rare Recordings From 1965-66The Golliwogs - Fight Fire - The Complete Recordings 1964-1967 The Boys Next Door - The Boys Next Door Glad - Feelin' Glad (1968)The Castaways - Liar, Liar (Best of the Castaways) USAThe Surfaris - 2 in 1 (Hit City'65 & It Ain't Me Babe)

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