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The Boys Next Door - The Boys Next Door





 Although the Boys Next Door's craftily arranged and produced sound was extremely derivative of the Beach Boys and other mid-'60s Southern California acts like Jan & Dean and Gary Lewis, this is a solid and fun collection of their singles (the earliest of which were billed to the Four Wheels) and unreleased cuts. It's also more sonically diverse than many '60s groups with obvious influences are, from the straight-up hot rod sounds of "Cold 45" (a cop of the Beach Boys' "409") to "Mandy" (which crosses the BBs' "Little Deuce Coupe" with the production of more sophisticated tunes like "The Little Girl I Once Knew"). To hammer home the Beach Boys comparison even more, "I Could See Me Dancing with You" owes a lot to the BBs' cover of "Do You Wanna Dance?" "Why Be Proud"/"Suddenly She Was Gone" explores a moodier vein, and there's an obscure Al Kooper co-composition, "There Is No Greater Sin." No, this music is not deep or lost genius. But not every unearthed batch of sounds from the mid-'60s has to be to be worth hearing.

The Boys Next Door - The Boys Next Door

Glad - Feelin' Glad (1968)

Glad - Feelin' Glad (1968)


Pre-Poco-pre-Eagles act Glad was the natural continuation of The New Breed (no members left). Their sole 1969's album is in the flower power/soft psychedelic style, complete with rich harmonies and heavy orchestration.
When the band folded Timothy Bruce Schmidt achieved international success first with Poco and then with the Eagles. Tom Phillips, George Hullin & Ron Floegel regrouped to form Redwing who released a string of albums throughout the 1970`s and beyond.


In 1966, under their own label, World United, The New Breed recorded a new single, "Fine With Me" b/w "The Sound of Music."  The band's music mirrored the progressive changes that were happening in the music world around this time, and their follow-up single "Wand Ad Reader," was, essentially, a New Breed re-write of  "Paperback Writer."

Around 1968, the band signed on with a new label, Equinox, under producer Terry Melcher, who had the group change their name to Glad.  

Members:
Ron Floegel — guitar, vocals
Tom Phillips — guitar, vocals
Timothy B. Schmit — bass, vocals
George Hullin — drums, vocals

In Los Angeles, Glad recorded one album, Feelin' Glad.  The album, again, is very Beatlesque, but it is a highly produced effort, more so like the post-'65 Beatles.  Apparently, the band was unhappy with the album due to the fact that they had very little control over it.  Certain parts of the record were overdubbed with strings, horns, and fancy production against the band's wishes.  Furthermore, its been stated that Tim Schmit is the only Glad member that appeared on the LP's track, "Shape of Things to Come," and this was apparently a sore spot for the group.  Regardless, the album, which is mostly Glad originals, is a solid album filled with great cuts and great singing and harmonies.
Unfortunately, Feelin' Glad did not sell particularly well, and in 1969, Tim Schmit, aka, Timothy B. Schmit was offered the position of bassist for Poco . He accepted it and went onto record some of the most under appreciated music ever with the band.  He became the replacement for Randy Meisner, who, ironically, he would replace again in the Eagles in 1977.  With Poco, Tim released 11 albums.

Glad, again, changed their name.  This time, they became Redwing....




Glad - Feelin' Glad (1968)


Glad - Feelin' Glad (1968)


The Castaways - Liar, Liar (Best of the Castaways) USA






Best remembered for their garage-rock perennial "Liar Liar," the Castaways formed in 1962 around the nucleus of guitarist Roy Hensley, bassist Dick Roby and drummer Denny Craswell; originally founded simply to perform at a fraternity party, the group proved such a smashing success that it remained an ongoing concern, expanding to a quintet with the subsequent additions of lead guitarist Bob Folschow and keyboardist Jim Donna. The Castaways' lone hit, "Liar Liar" was written by Donna and released on the Soma label in 1965, reaching the number 12 slot on the U.S. charts on the strength of its inimitable echo-drenched vocals and wheezing keyboards. A series of follow-up efforts flopped, however, and despite an appearance in the 1967 film It's a Bikini World, the Castaways' career ground to a halt, although the band often performed live in the decades to follow.

The Castaways are a rock and roll band based in Minnesota that have been playing concerts, parties and weddings for years. Jim Donna (keyboards and vocals) is one of the original members of the band. It was his composition, Liar Liar that not only became a million selling song and landed in the top 10, but a song Robert credits as being influential to the sound of his then group, the Band of Joy. 

Bob Donna later joined the band on guitar and vocals with Rick Snider on drums and vocals, and Ralph Hintz on bass and vocals. In 2005 Jim Donna was inducted into the Minnesota Rock/Country Hall of Fame.

Their music has a high energy lively dance beat blended with the soul sounds of The Righteous Brothers. Their song selection runs the gamut of pop and classic rock, ballads to 50s and 60s favorites. 



One of the great one-hit wonders of the mid-'60s, the Castaways  with a catchy, garage sound best exemplified by their lone national hit, "Liar Liar." This 22-track anthology takes listeners through the band's entire history, right up to the present time, including a "Liar Liar 2000" remake. Along the way, the band goes through the customary stylistic changes (from garage to Beatles cops to soul to psychedelia) in search of that elusive second hit that most bands go through, trying new styles to fit the changing times until coming full circle back to their original sound. Great notes on the band's history and the new cuts brings a nice sense of closure to the package. 


The Surfaris - 2 in 1 (Hit City'65 & It Ain't Me Babe)

The Surfaris - 2 in 1 (Hit City'65 & It Ain't Me Babe)

A Glendora, CA, surf group remembered for "Wipe Out," the number two 1963 hit that ranks as one of the great rock instrumentals, featuring a classic up-and-down guitar riff and a classic solo drum roll break, both of which were emulated by millions (the number is no exaggeration) of beginning rock & rollers. They recorded an astonishing number of albums (about half a dozen) and singles in the mid-'60s; the "Wipe Out" follow-up, "Point Panic," was the only one to struggle up to the middle of the charts. The Surfaris were not extraordinary, but they were more talented than the typical one-shot surf group; drummer Ron Wilson was praised by session stickman extraordinaire Hal Blaine, and his uninhibited splashing style sounds like a direct ancestor to Keith Moon. He also took the lead vocals on the group's occasional Beach Boys imitations.



The Surfaris - 2 in 1 (Hit City'65 & It Ain't Me Babe)


The Surfaris - 2 in 1 (Hit City'65 & It Ain't Me Babe)


Barbra Streisand - People (1964)



Barbra Streisand - People  (1964)

After two less successful albums, Barbra Streisand returned to form on her fourth album, People, with a selection of songs that showed some of the imagination of her debut album. Much of the material was new. The album opened and closed with songs by Jule Styne and Bob Merrill, first "Absent Minded Me," and then the Top Ten title song that was the hit from Streisand's triumphant Broadway show, Funny Girl. Streisand introduced Cy Coleman and Carolyn Leigh's "When in Rome (I Do as the Romans Do)," a lively song that allowed her to display some of the spirit and humor that had been missing on her last two outings. And when picking from older songs, she again found obscure or atypical tunes from prominent composers or lost gems she could make her own. In the former category were Irving Berlin's "Supper Time," a blues song unlike any the composer had ever done, and "My Lord and Master," from Rodgers & Hammerstein's The King and I. In the latter was the delightful "Fine and Dandy," from the 1930 show of the same name, with music by Kay Swift. Add in some obvious choices like Jimmy Van Heusen and Sammy Cahn's "Love Is a Bore" (a companion to the previously recorded "Down with Love") and "Don't Like Goodbyes," another selection from Harold Arlen and Truman Capote's House of Flowers, from which Streisand had earlier picked "A Sleepin' Bee," and you have an album fashioned to play to the singer's strengths and musical tastes instead of trying to fit her into existing ones. That wasn't quite enough to match the quality of her debut album, but it was a definite improvement over the second and third albums. (People won Grammy Awards for Best Vocal Performance and Best Album Cover.)

Barbra Streisand - People  (1964)

Barbra Streisand - People  (1964)

She - Outta Reach (1970)

She - Outta Reach (1970)


She were one of the few all-female garage psychedelic American bands of the 1960s that played their own instruments and wrote their own material, although their official output was limited to one obscure 1970 independent single. She nonetheless had a lengthy and somewhat complicated history, beginning in the mid-'60s when guitarist and primary songwriter Nancy Ross formed a teen band (with her younger sister Sally on organ) in Sacramento, CA. Originally known as the Id, they changed their name to the Hairem and did attract some label interest. The Hairem did not officially release any material in the '60s, but five songs that they recorded did come out on the She CD compilation Wants a Piece of You in 1999. These cuts, though not as crude as the Shaggs, were nonetheless quite raw and basic, in the manner of many U.S. garage bands of the period. Indeed, they're pretty generic, or sub-generic, the chief distinction being that there were extremely few all-female groups playing such music circa 1966, especially with the raunchy attitude evident on cuts such as "Like a Snake."

The Hairem played in San Francisco and Sacramento, at both clubs and air force bases, and after several personnel changes, they had changed their name to She by the late '60s. By this point, their music was still not terribly sophisticated, but had nonetheless grown more sophisticated, with a greater emphasis on harmonies and minor-keyed, psychedelic-influenced melodies. They did record an obscure single for Kent in 1970, "Boy Little Boy"/"Outta Reach," the A-side of which was uncharacteristically soft and poppy, almost bubblegum pop. Other original material written and demoed at this time is on the Wants a Piece of You CD and shows the influence of bands like the Doors and the Jefferson Airplane, although the unschooled raunch is still present. Fact is, though, that while the performances are energetic and the vocals often salacious, the songs aren't all that clever or memorable. She disbanded in 1971, Nancy Ross and her sister Sally Ross-Moore being the only members to have stayed the course throughout the entire Hairem-She saga.

She - Outta Reach (1970)


The Ventures - Walk Don't Run (1960)

The Ventures - Walk Don't Run (1960)

This debut album by the Ventures is surprisingly good, considering that it was recorded in a huge rush during an era when all concerned couldn't help but know that rock & roll albums (apart from those by Elvis Presley) generally didn't sell very well; indeed, the fact that this is so good speaks volumes about the class and talent of the group at this early point in their history. With a sudden and totally unexpected number two national hit in "Walk, Don't Run" and a burgeoning demand for live performances, the quartet went in and recorded the best 11 tracks they knew to get a long player together, all done in such a hurry that the members themselves couldn't stay around long enough to be photographed for the cover (those are stand-ins). The result is surprisingly sophisticated in its use of stereo (then still relatively unusual in rock & roll, stereo LPs only debuted three years earlier and were largely confined to classical recordings), dividing the sound of the band quite neatly on two sides, thus giving LP purchasers a treat that owners of the single "Walk, Don't Run" would miss -- not only the sound separation that was so prized by audiophiles of the era, but crisp presentation of each instrument, dividing the two guitars very neatly. Thus, the casual listener could play with the speaker settings and balances, and the serious fans could get in close on the actual playing. The material is a mix of originals and hits drawn from every category, including earlier rock & roll instrumentals ("Raunchy"), R&B "Night Train," and even film music ("My Own True Love [Tara's Theme]") -- one can just make out the familiar Max Steiner Gone with the Wind motif on the latter, and it is a fairly inventive approach to an old musical chestnut, rebuilding it from the ground up. The material all has a lean jauntiness, most unexpectedly "Night Train," which sounds closer in spirit to Chet Atkins than to Buddy Morrow or King Curtis. The originals were no filler, either, "The McCoy" being a hot piece of surf guitar showcasing all concerned.
The Ventures - Walk Don't Run (1960)



The Wailers - The Fabulous Wailers (1959)


The Wailers - The Fabulous Wailers (1959)


The Wailers - The Fabulous Wailers (1959)


This debut album by the Ventures is surprisingly good, considering that it was recorded in a huge rush during an era when all concerned couldn't help but know that rock & roll albums (apart from those by Elvis Presley) generally didn't sell very well; indeed, the fact that this is so good speaks volumes about the class and talent of the group at this early point in their history. With a sudden and totally unexpected number two national hit in "Walk, Don't Run" and a burgeoning demand for live performances, the quartet went in and recorded the best 11 tracks they knew to get a long player together, all done in such a hurry that the members themselves couldn't stay around long enough to be photographed for the cover (those are stand-ins). The result is surprisingly sophisticated in its use of stereo (then still relatively unusual in rock & roll, stereo LPs only debuted three years earlier and were largely confined to classical recordings), dividing the sound of the band quite neatly on two sides, thus giving LP purchasers a treat that owners of the single "Walk, Don't Run" would miss -- not only the sound separation that was so prized by audiophiles of the era, but crisp presentation of each instrument, dividing the two guitars very neatly. Thus, the casual listener could play with the speaker settings and balances, and the serious fans could get in close on the actual playing. The material is a mix of originals and hits drawn from every category, including earlier rock & roll instrumentals ("Raunchy"), R&B "Night Train," and even film music ("My Own True Love [Tara's Theme]") -- one can just make out the familiar Max Steiner Gone with the Wind motif on the latter, and it is a fairly inventive approach to an old musical chestnut, rebuilding it from the ground up. The material all has a lean jauntiness, most unexpectedly "Night Train," which sounds closer in spirit to Chet Atkins than to Buddy Morrow or King Curtis. The originals were no filler, either, "The McCoy" being a hot piece of surf guitar showcasing all concerned.

The Wailers - The Fabulous Wailers (1959)


The Wailers - The Fabulous Wailers (1959)





Cannibal & The Headhunters ‎– Land Of 1000 Dances 1965 (2005)





Cannibal & the Headhunters were an American band from East Los Angeles. They were one of the first Mexican-American groups to have a national hit record, "Land of a Thousand Dances", recorded on the Rampart label. They were the opening act on The Beatles' second American tour, backed up by the King Curtis band.They played at the historic Shea Stadium concert from August 15 to August 30 during the 1965 tour that was headlined by The Beatles.




Frankie (Cannibal) Garcia 
Robert Jaramillo 
Joe Jaramillo 
Richard Lopez

They were discovered by Rampart Records label owner and founder Eddie Davis—and were among the 1960s Mexican-American musicians and singers who pioneered the "East Side Sound" of Los Angeles, a musical phenomenon that attracted international attention.



Frankie (Cannibal) Garcia founded the group in 1964; the other group members were Bobby and Joe "Yo Yo" Jaramillo and Richard Lopez who were in the group for 18 months. in 1983 Frankie (Cannibal) Garcia retired from the music business and turn Cannibal and the Headhunters over to Robert Zapata who has been in the group since 1969 and still performing today. Cannibal and the Headhunters on Facebook. [Barely out of high school, they came from Ramona Gardens and Estrada Courts Housing Projects of East Los Angeles, and were inspired by the African American doo wop groups in their neighborhoods. Garcia attended Andrew Jackson high, in East LA. He frequently sang spontaneously while walking around campus. He had a very strong voice. This group toured recorded and performed together for only eighteen months, when Frankie "Cannibal" Garcia hired two new background singers " Eddie Serrano " and " George Ochoa " as the new Headhunters. Their version of "Land of a Thousand Dances" was a cover version of the original Chris Kenner tune, arranged and produced by Max Uballez with Frankie Garcia, and engineered by Bruce Morgan.[citation needed] The record reached #30 in the Billboard Hot 100 chart in early 1965. Wilson Pickett recorded the song into a national hit for himself in 1967, also using the "na, na, na, na" lyric.[citation needed] The story of Frankie Garcia forgetting the lyrics to his hit song is " Urban folklore " and was something that Eddie Davis came up with to create some mysteriousness around the "na na na na na" phrase that " Cannibal " came up with due to a bad mic cord that kept cutting off and on Frankie Garcia was a professional singer and never forgot any words to any song. On May 7, 1965 " Cannibal and the Headhunters in concert with the " Rolling Stones " " the Beach Boys " " the Righteous Brothers " and " Marty Robbins " in Birmingham Alabama at Legion Field. Three months later Paul McCartney himself requested that Frankie "Cannibal" Garcia and his group join the Beatles tour. August 15 through August 31, 1965 at Shea Stadium New York and at the Hollywood Bowl California.







The Gants - Gants Galore & Road Runner

The Gants - Gants Galore & Road Runner

US American band formed 1963 in Greenwood, Mississippi. Members included: Sid Herring, Johnny Freeman, Vince Montgomery, Don Wood, Johnny Sanders. 


1-12 tracks  from The LP "Road Runner"
13-24 tracks  from The LP "Gants Galore"  
25-28 tracks  from The LP "Gants Again"
29-31 Single Tracks

The Gants - Gants Galore & Road Runner

The Boys Next Door - The Boys Next Door Glad - Feelin' Glad (1968)The Castaways - Liar, Liar (Best of the Castaways) USAThe Surfaris - 2 in 1 (Hit City'65 & It Ain't Me Babe)Barbra Streisand - People  (1964) She - Outta Reach (1970)The Ventures - Walk Don't Run (1960)The Wailers - The Fabulous Wailers (1959)Cannibal & The Headhunters ‎– Land Of 1000 Dances 1965 (2005)The Gants - Gants Galore & Road Runner

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