close

Old Melodies ... | category: US | (page 5 of 32)

home

Old Melodies ...

Beat, Garage,Psychedelic... and much more in one place.

allmusic-wingsofdream.blogspot.com

Barbra Streisand - People (1964)



Barbra Streisand - People  (1964)

After two less successful albums, Barbra Streisand returned to form on her fourth album, People, with a selection of songs that showed some of the imagination of her debut album. Much of the material was new. The album opened and closed with songs by Jule Styne and Bob Merrill, first "Absent Minded Me," and then the Top Ten title song that was the hit from Streisand's triumphant Broadway show, Funny Girl. Streisand introduced Cy Coleman and Carolyn Leigh's "When in Rome (I Do as the Romans Do)," a lively song that allowed her to display some of the spirit and humor that had been missing on her last two outings. And when picking from older songs, she again found obscure or atypical tunes from prominent composers or lost gems she could make her own. In the former category were Irving Berlin's "Supper Time," a blues song unlike any the composer had ever done, and "My Lord and Master," from Rodgers & Hammerstein's The King and I. In the latter was the delightful "Fine and Dandy," from the 1930 show of the same name, with music by Kay Swift. Add in some obvious choices like Jimmy Van Heusen and Sammy Cahn's "Love Is a Bore" (a companion to the previously recorded "Down with Love") and "Don't Like Goodbyes," another selection from Harold Arlen and Truman Capote's House of Flowers, from which Streisand had earlier picked "A Sleepin' Bee," and you have an album fashioned to play to the singer's strengths and musical tastes instead of trying to fit her into existing ones. That wasn't quite enough to match the quality of her debut album, but it was a definite improvement over the second and third albums. (People won Grammy Awards for Best Vocal Performance and Best Album Cover.)

Barbra Streisand - People  (1964)

Barbra Streisand - People  (1964)

She - Outta Reach (1970)

She - Outta Reach (1970)


She were one of the few all-female garage psychedelic American bands of the 1960s that played their own instruments and wrote their own material, although their official output was limited to one obscure 1970 independent single. She nonetheless had a lengthy and somewhat complicated history, beginning in the mid-'60s when guitarist and primary songwriter Nancy Ross formed a teen band (with her younger sister Sally on organ) in Sacramento, CA. Originally known as the Id, they changed their name to the Hairem and did attract some label interest. The Hairem did not officially release any material in the '60s, but five songs that they recorded did come out on the She CD compilation Wants a Piece of You in 1999. These cuts, though not as crude as the Shaggs, were nonetheless quite raw and basic, in the manner of many U.S. garage bands of the period. Indeed, they're pretty generic, or sub-generic, the chief distinction being that there were extremely few all-female groups playing such music circa 1966, especially with the raunchy attitude evident on cuts such as "Like a Snake."

The Hairem played in San Francisco and Sacramento, at both clubs and air force bases, and after several personnel changes, they had changed their name to She by the late '60s. By this point, their music was still not terribly sophisticated, but had nonetheless grown more sophisticated, with a greater emphasis on harmonies and minor-keyed, psychedelic-influenced melodies. They did record an obscure single for Kent in 1970, "Boy Little Boy"/"Outta Reach," the A-side of which was uncharacteristically soft and poppy, almost bubblegum pop. Other original material written and demoed at this time is on the Wants a Piece of You CD and shows the influence of bands like the Doors and the Jefferson Airplane, although the unschooled raunch is still present. Fact is, though, that while the performances are energetic and the vocals often salacious, the songs aren't all that clever or memorable. She disbanded in 1971, Nancy Ross and her sister Sally Ross-Moore being the only members to have stayed the course throughout the entire Hairem-She saga.

She - Outta Reach (1970)


The Ventures - Walk Don't Run (1960)

The Ventures - Walk Don't Run (1960)

This debut album by the Ventures is surprisingly good, considering that it was recorded in a huge rush during an era when all concerned couldn't help but know that rock & roll albums (apart from those by Elvis Presley) generally didn't sell very well; indeed, the fact that this is so good speaks volumes about the class and talent of the group at this early point in their history. With a sudden and totally unexpected number two national hit in "Walk, Don't Run" and a burgeoning demand for live performances, the quartet went in and recorded the best 11 tracks they knew to get a long player together, all done in such a hurry that the members themselves couldn't stay around long enough to be photographed for the cover (those are stand-ins). The result is surprisingly sophisticated in its use of stereo (then still relatively unusual in rock & roll, stereo LPs only debuted three years earlier and were largely confined to classical recordings), dividing the sound of the band quite neatly on two sides, thus giving LP purchasers a treat that owners of the single "Walk, Don't Run" would miss -- not only the sound separation that was so prized by audiophiles of the era, but crisp presentation of each instrument, dividing the two guitars very neatly. Thus, the casual listener could play with the speaker settings and balances, and the serious fans could get in close on the actual playing. The material is a mix of originals and hits drawn from every category, including earlier rock & roll instrumentals ("Raunchy"), R&B "Night Train," and even film music ("My Own True Love [Tara's Theme]") -- one can just make out the familiar Max Steiner Gone with the Wind motif on the latter, and it is a fairly inventive approach to an old musical chestnut, rebuilding it from the ground up. The material all has a lean jauntiness, most unexpectedly "Night Train," which sounds closer in spirit to Chet Atkins than to Buddy Morrow or King Curtis. The originals were no filler, either, "The McCoy" being a hot piece of surf guitar showcasing all concerned.
The Ventures - Walk Don't Run (1960)



The Wailers - The Fabulous Wailers (1959)


The Wailers - The Fabulous Wailers (1959)


The Wailers - The Fabulous Wailers (1959)


This debut album by the Ventures is surprisingly good, considering that it was recorded in a huge rush during an era when all concerned couldn't help but know that rock & roll albums (apart from those by Elvis Presley) generally didn't sell very well; indeed, the fact that this is so good speaks volumes about the class and talent of the group at this early point in their history. With a sudden and totally unexpected number two national hit in "Walk, Don't Run" and a burgeoning demand for live performances, the quartet went in and recorded the best 11 tracks they knew to get a long player together, all done in such a hurry that the members themselves couldn't stay around long enough to be photographed for the cover (those are stand-ins). The result is surprisingly sophisticated in its use of stereo (then still relatively unusual in rock & roll, stereo LPs only debuted three years earlier and were largely confined to classical recordings), dividing the sound of the band quite neatly on two sides, thus giving LP purchasers a treat that owners of the single "Walk, Don't Run" would miss -- not only the sound separation that was so prized by audiophiles of the era, but crisp presentation of each instrument, dividing the two guitars very neatly. Thus, the casual listener could play with the speaker settings and balances, and the serious fans could get in close on the actual playing. The material is a mix of originals and hits drawn from every category, including earlier rock & roll instrumentals ("Raunchy"), R&B "Night Train," and even film music ("My Own True Love [Tara's Theme]") -- one can just make out the familiar Max Steiner Gone with the Wind motif on the latter, and it is a fairly inventive approach to an old musical chestnut, rebuilding it from the ground up. The material all has a lean jauntiness, most unexpectedly "Night Train," which sounds closer in spirit to Chet Atkins than to Buddy Morrow or King Curtis. The originals were no filler, either, "The McCoy" being a hot piece of surf guitar showcasing all concerned.

The Wailers - The Fabulous Wailers (1959)


The Wailers - The Fabulous Wailers (1959)





Cannibal & The Headhunters ‎– Land Of 1000 Dances 1965 (2005)





Cannibal & the Headhunters were an American band from East Los Angeles. They were one of the first Mexican-American groups to have a national hit record, "Land of a Thousand Dances", recorded on the Rampart label. They were the opening act on The Beatles' second American tour, backed up by the King Curtis band.They played at the historic Shea Stadium concert from August 15 to August 30 during the 1965 tour that was headlined by The Beatles.




Frankie (Cannibal) Garcia 
Robert Jaramillo 
Joe Jaramillo 
Richard Lopez

They were discovered by Rampart Records label owner and founder Eddie Davis—and were among the 1960s Mexican-American musicians and singers who pioneered the "East Side Sound" of Los Angeles, a musical phenomenon that attracted international attention.



Frankie (Cannibal) Garcia founded the group in 1964; the other group members were Bobby and Joe "Yo Yo" Jaramillo and Richard Lopez who were in the group for 18 months. in 1983 Frankie (Cannibal) Garcia retired from the music business and turn Cannibal and the Headhunters over to Robert Zapata who has been in the group since 1969 and still performing today. Cannibal and the Headhunters on Facebook. [Barely out of high school, they came from Ramona Gardens and Estrada Courts Housing Projects of East Los Angeles, and were inspired by the African American doo wop groups in their neighborhoods. Garcia attended Andrew Jackson high, in East LA. He frequently sang spontaneously while walking around campus. He had a very strong voice. This group toured recorded and performed together for only eighteen months, when Frankie "Cannibal" Garcia hired two new background singers " Eddie Serrano " and " George Ochoa " as the new Headhunters. Their version of "Land of a Thousand Dances" was a cover version of the original Chris Kenner tune, arranged and produced by Max Uballez with Frankie Garcia, and engineered by Bruce Morgan.[citation needed] The record reached #30 in the Billboard Hot 100 chart in early 1965. Wilson Pickett recorded the song into a national hit for himself in 1967, also using the "na, na, na, na" lyric.[citation needed] The story of Frankie Garcia forgetting the lyrics to his hit song is " Urban folklore " and was something that Eddie Davis came up with to create some mysteriousness around the "na na na na na" phrase that " Cannibal " came up with due to a bad mic cord that kept cutting off and on Frankie Garcia was a professional singer and never forgot any words to any song. On May 7, 1965 " Cannibal and the Headhunters in concert with the " Rolling Stones " " the Beach Boys " " the Righteous Brothers " and " Marty Robbins " in Birmingham Alabama at Legion Field. Three months later Paul McCartney himself requested that Frankie "Cannibal" Garcia and his group join the Beatles tour. August 15 through August 31, 1965 at Shea Stadium New York and at the Hollywood Bowl California.







The Gants - Gants Galore & Road Runner

The Gants - Gants Galore & Road Runner

US American band formed 1963 in Greenwood, Mississippi. Members included: Sid Herring, Johnny Freeman, Vince Montgomery, Don Wood, Johnny Sanders. 


1-12 tracks  from The LP "Road Runner"
13-24 tracks  from The LP "Gants Galore"  
25-28 tracks  from The LP "Gants Again"
29-31 Single Tracks

The Gants - Gants Galore & Road Runner

The Knack - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)

The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)


The original, ‘60’s Sunset Strip era Knack was formed in 1965 at Hollywood High by Michael Chain. The band was originally named The In Mates but after a Shindig road show changed their moniker to The Knack.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Knack_(1960s_US_band)

The original InMates line-up consisted of:

Michael Chain - Lead Vocals,
Dink Kaplan - Guitar,
Ken Meyers - Drums, and
Larry Gould - Bass.
Bobby Cochran  later replaced Kaplan and Pug Baker replaced Meyers.

The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)

The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)

The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)

The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)

The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)


The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)

If you ever wanted an illustration of the idea that history is written by the winners, you need look no further than the story of the Knack. Everyone knows how Doug Fieger's heavily hyped skinny-tie band became a new wave sensation under that name via their blockbuster 1979 single, "My Sharona." But 12 years earlier, another L.A. singer/songwriter/guitarist led his band through its own brief swirl of publicity using the same band name and recording for the same label (Capitol). Although they were just as talented in their own way as the "My Sharona" gang, Michael Chain's '60s iteration of the Knack never came near a hit, and despite a big promo push for their initial batch of singles, they never cut a full album, and they quickly slipped through the cracks of history, unknown to all but hardcore '60s pop mavens. Hell, they weren't even the best-known '60s band to call themselves the Knack -- that honor goes to the London group that became better known after changing their name to Gun. Fortunately for the wider world, indefatigable '60s pop archivist label Now Sounds has gathered together the entire recorded output of Chain's Knack, finally giving them the album they always deserved, four and a half decades after the fact. The band released only four singles during its brief lifespan, and all the A and B sides are present and accounted for here, along with five previously unheard tunes and an alternate mix. The Knack's 1967 debut single, "I'm Aware"/"Time Waits for No One," shows the band's knack -- ahem -- for perky, Buckinghams-like pop on the latter tune and its penchant for pushing the envelope, with the odd time signatures and exotic addition of the zither-like marxophone on the former. From the subtle jazz shadings of "Softly, Softly" to the moody folk-rock feel of the unreleased Beau Brummels-ish "The Girl with the Dark Brown Eyes" (written for actress Barbara Hershey, Chain's objet d'amour at the time), it's clear that even in the short amount of time they had to evolve, the Knack already possessed an unusual amount of sophistication. Late as it is in arriving, their first full-length release is still a striking document.

The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)

The Fifth Estate (D-Men) - Ding Dong! The Witch Is Back! (1964-1969)



Best known for their playful rearrangement of "Ding Dong! The Witch is Dead," which became a hit in 1967, the Fifth Estate were a rock band from Stamford, Connecticut that started out playing garage rock, later evolving into a more adventurous sound incorporating folk-rock and baroque psychedelia. The group's story began in 1963; a teenaged keyboard player named Wayne Wadhams began hosting regular jam sessions in his basement, and a core of musicians coalesced from his musical workouts, including guitarists Rick Engler and Bill Shute, bassist Doug Ferrara, and drummer Ken Evans. The five players formed a band called the Decadants; before long, the group changed the name to the Demen, and they caught the ear of Kevin Gavin, who saw them play an all-ages show and was impressed with their songs and their ability to work an audience. Gavin became the Demen's manager, and in 1964 he helped them score a deal with Veep Records, who persuaded the band to change their name to the easier-to-pronounce D-Men. A pair of singles for Veep and one for Kapp earned East Coast airplay but didn't become hits, and while touring the Midwest, the group ran across a Michigan-based underground newspaper called The Fifth Estate. The D-Men liked the name and its subversive subtext, and when they signed to Red Bird Records in 1965 after the addition of singer Chuck LeGros, they adopted the Fifth Estate as their new handle. Red Bird went out of business not long after the release of "Love Is All a Game," and by the time the Fifth Estate landed their next record deal, LeGros was out of the band.

Time Tunnel The group had been working with lyricist Don Askew (he wrote songs with Wadhams that were recorded by the Brothers Four and Reparata & the Delrons), and when Askew quipped one day that any song could be made into a hit with the right studio treatment, the Fifth Estate cheerfully took him up on the challenge. They came up with a glossy but clever baroque pop arrangement of "Ding Dong! The Witch Is Dead," which first appeared in the classic 1939 film The Wizard of Oz, and after Jubilee Records heard the demo, they signed the group to a contract. In 1967, record buyers proved Askew was right when the Fifth Estate's interpretation became a major hit, rising to number 11 on Billboard's singles charts. The Fifth Estate toured and recorded steadily over the next two years, but while their work was strong, "Ding Dong!" proved to be their only Top 40 hit, and the bandmembers found themselves at odds with Jubilee when the label released a pair of singles credited to the Fifth Estate that were actually the work of session musicians, with no input from the band. By the end of 1970, the Fifth Estate had broken up and Jubilee was out of business. Most of the members remained active in music, and they reunited in the 21st century, releasing two new albums, 2011's Time Tunnel and 2014's Take the Fifth; both albums were co-produced by Shel Talmy, and featured Bob Klein on keyboard and guitar, who joined the band after the death of Wayne Wadhams in 2008. A comprehensive collection of the band's music, Anthology, Vol. 1: The Witch Is Dead, was released by Fuel 2000 Records in 2012.





The Esquires - Flashin' Red

The Esquires - Flashin' Red

Instrumental surf/garage band from California. Released in february of '64 "Flashin' Red" b/w "What a Burn". They changed their name several times (LAUGHING GRAVY in '67 then GYPSY BANNED and THE POLICE in '68). The rehearsal sessions on this release were recorded on a home reel to reel machine with one mike!

The Esquires - Flashin' Red


Barbra Streisand - People  (1964) She - Outta Reach (1970)The Ventures - Walk Don't Run (1960)The Wailers - The Fabulous Wailers (1959)Cannibal & The Headhunters ‎– Land Of 1000 Dances 1965 (2005)The Gants - Gants Galore & Road RunnerThe Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)The Turtles - 20 Greatest Hits The Fifth Estate (D-Men) - Ding Dong! The Witch Is Back! (1964-1969)The Esquires - Flashin' Red

Report "Old Melodies ..."

Are you sure you want to report this post for ?

Cancel
×