close

Old Melodies ... | category: US | (page 5 of 32)

home

Old Melodies ...

Beat, Garage,Psychedelic... and much more in one place.

allmusic-wingsofdream.blogspot.com

The Knack - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)

The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)


The original, ‘60’s Sunset Strip era Knack was formed in 1965 at Hollywood High by Michael Chain. The band was originally named The In Mates but after a Shindig road show changed their moniker to The Knack.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Knack_(1960s_US_band)

The original InMates line-up consisted of:

Michael Chain - Lead Vocals,
Dink Kaplan - Guitar,
Ken Meyers - Drums, and
Larry Gould - Bass.
Bobby Cochran  later replaced Kaplan and Pug Baker replaced Meyers.

The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)

The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)

The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)

The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)

The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)


The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)

If you ever wanted an illustration of the idea that history is written by the winners, you need look no further than the story of the Knack. Everyone knows how Doug Fieger's heavily hyped skinny-tie band became a new wave sensation under that name via their blockbuster 1979 single, "My Sharona." But 12 years earlier, another L.A. singer/songwriter/guitarist led his band through its own brief swirl of publicity using the same band name and recording for the same label (Capitol). Although they were just as talented in their own way as the "My Sharona" gang, Michael Chain's '60s iteration of the Knack never came near a hit, and despite a big promo push for their initial batch of singles, they never cut a full album, and they quickly slipped through the cracks of history, unknown to all but hardcore '60s pop mavens. Hell, they weren't even the best-known '60s band to call themselves the Knack -- that honor goes to the London group that became better known after changing their name to Gun. Fortunately for the wider world, indefatigable '60s pop archivist label Now Sounds has gathered together the entire recorded output of Chain's Knack, finally giving them the album they always deserved, four and a half decades after the fact. The band released only four singles during its brief lifespan, and all the A and B sides are present and accounted for here, along with five previously unheard tunes and an alternate mix. The Knack's 1967 debut single, "I'm Aware"/"Time Waits for No One," shows the band's knack -- ahem -- for perky, Buckinghams-like pop on the latter tune and its penchant for pushing the envelope, with the odd time signatures and exotic addition of the zither-like marxophone on the former. From the subtle jazz shadings of "Softly, Softly" to the moody folk-rock feel of the unreleased Beau Brummels-ish "The Girl with the Dark Brown Eyes" (written for actress Barbara Hershey, Chain's objet d'amour at the time), it's clear that even in the short amount of time they had to evolve, the Knack already possessed an unusual amount of sophistication. Late as it is in arriving, their first full-length release is still a striking document.

The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)

The Fifth Estate (D-Men) - Ding Dong! The Witch Is Back! (1964-1969)



Best known for their playful rearrangement of "Ding Dong! The Witch is Dead," which became a hit in 1967, the Fifth Estate were a rock band from Stamford, Connecticut that started out playing garage rock, later evolving into a more adventurous sound incorporating folk-rock and baroque psychedelia. The group's story began in 1963; a teenaged keyboard player named Wayne Wadhams began hosting regular jam sessions in his basement, and a core of musicians coalesced from his musical workouts, including guitarists Rick Engler and Bill Shute, bassist Doug Ferrara, and drummer Ken Evans. The five players formed a band called the Decadants; before long, the group changed the name to the Demen, and they caught the ear of Kevin Gavin, who saw them play an all-ages show and was impressed with their songs and their ability to work an audience. Gavin became the Demen's manager, and in 1964 he helped them score a deal with Veep Records, who persuaded the band to change their name to the easier-to-pronounce D-Men. A pair of singles for Veep and one for Kapp earned East Coast airplay but didn't become hits, and while touring the Midwest, the group ran across a Michigan-based underground newspaper called The Fifth Estate. The D-Men liked the name and its subversive subtext, and when they signed to Red Bird Records in 1965 after the addition of singer Chuck LeGros, they adopted the Fifth Estate as their new handle. Red Bird went out of business not long after the release of "Love Is All a Game," and by the time the Fifth Estate landed their next record deal, LeGros was out of the band.

Time Tunnel The group had been working with lyricist Don Askew (he wrote songs with Wadhams that were recorded by the Brothers Four and Reparata & the Delrons), and when Askew quipped one day that any song could be made into a hit with the right studio treatment, the Fifth Estate cheerfully took him up on the challenge. They came up with a glossy but clever baroque pop arrangement of "Ding Dong! The Witch Is Dead," which first appeared in the classic 1939 film The Wizard of Oz, and after Jubilee Records heard the demo, they signed the group to a contract. In 1967, record buyers proved Askew was right when the Fifth Estate's interpretation became a major hit, rising to number 11 on Billboard's singles charts. The Fifth Estate toured and recorded steadily over the next two years, but while their work was strong, "Ding Dong!" proved to be their only Top 40 hit, and the bandmembers found themselves at odds with Jubilee when the label released a pair of singles credited to the Fifth Estate that were actually the work of session musicians, with no input from the band. By the end of 1970, the Fifth Estate had broken up and Jubilee was out of business. Most of the members remained active in music, and they reunited in the 21st century, releasing two new albums, 2011's Time Tunnel and 2014's Take the Fifth; both albums were co-produced by Shel Talmy, and featured Bob Klein on keyboard and guitar, who joined the band after the death of Wayne Wadhams in 2008. A comprehensive collection of the band's music, Anthology, Vol. 1: The Witch Is Dead, was released by Fuel 2000 Records in 2012.





The Esquires - Flashin' Red

The Esquires - Flashin' Red

Instrumental surf/garage band from California. Released in february of '64 "Flashin' Red" b/w "What a Burn". They changed their name several times (LAUGHING GRAVY in '67 then GYPSY BANNED and THE POLICE in '68). The rehearsal sessions on this release were recorded on a home reel to reel machine with one mike!

The Esquires - Flashin' Red


The British Walkers ‎– Shake / That Was Yesterday (1967)

The British Walkers ‎– Shake / That Was Yesterday (1967)

The British Walkers weren’t actually British. They were an American band whose sound was influenced by The Rolling Stones, The Who, and The Kinks. Forming in 1964, The British Walkers lasted only four years, breaking up in 1968.


A.British Walkers-Shake                                     
B. British Walkers - That Was Yesterday                     
Bonus 1. British Walkers - Diddley Daddy                    
Bonus 2. British Walkers - The Story Of My Life             
Bonus 3. .British Walkers- Watch Yourself                   
Bonus 4.. British Walkers - Bad Lightning                   
Bonus 5. British Walkers - I Found You 

WANTED : The British Walkers Are Coming

The British Walkers ‎– Shake / That Was Yesterday (1967)

The British Walkers ‎– Shake / That Was Yesterday (1967)



Friar Tuck - Friar Tuck and his Psychedelic Guitar (1967)

Friar Tuck - Friar Tuck and his Psychedelic Guitar (1967)

It would be all too easy to simply write this off as a mere exploitation knock-off designed to catch naive hippies. It certainly is that, but it also has the hand (and voice) of Curt Boettcher all over it, and it features Mike Deasy, heavy L.A. session cat and sometime-member of Phil Spector's Wrecking Crew on guitar, musical arrangements and producing. Consisting of about half covers and half originals, the album could hardly be considered truly psychedelic (mostly thanks to the Boettcher vocals) but it is quite interesting in its own way. Deasy's arrangements are strange and wonderful with some hot guitar playing and liberal use of the echoplex. He gives "Louie Louie," the quintessential simple rock & roll tune, a wildly elaborate arrangement, virtually re-creating the tune entirely. He gives Nat Adderly and Oscar Brown, Jr.'s "Work Song" an echoplex and guitar intro, inserts a bit of twang then goes into a classical sounding passage and back. Oddly enough, it also sounds reminiscent of the Count Five's "Psychotic Reaction"! Deasy's ultra-stoned sounding vocals on "Alley Oop" are hilarious. The originals can't be called instrumentals due to Boettcher and company's ever present wordless vocals, which get really bizarre on "Fendabenda Ha Ha Ha" and "Where Did Your Mind Go?." [These tracks are a really odd combination of gonzo guitar soloing and the Living Voices on acid. The bonus tracks by the Flower Pot have actual lyrics and are less elaborately arranged than the Friar Tuck album, and have quite a different feel to them. "Black Moto" and "Wantin' Ain't Gettin" even have some sitar. Originally issued as 45 rpms, they're a nice addition and it makes sense to gather Deasy's originals all in one place. All in all, Friar Tuck & His Psychedelic Guitar is a thoroughly entertaining curiosity. [This album was reissued in 2007 with four bonus tracks from the Flower Pot.]


Friar Tuck - Friar Tuck and his Psychedelic Guitar (1967)

Friar Tuck was a stage name for L.A. session guitarist Mike Deasy. The Friar Tuck album is essentially a Mike Deasy solo album made with the help of Deasy's studio friends. The March 1996 edition of Guitar Player Magazine lists the Friar Tuck album as being in Jimi Hendrix' personal record collection.

The Bourbons - House Party 1964-'66 (Rockin' Sounds from Boston's South Shore)

The Bourbons - House Party 1964-'66 (Rockin' Sounds from Boston's South Shore)

An extremely typical garage band of the mid-'60s, the Bourbons never released a record. Their set consisted almost entirely of faithful covers of current rock hits, which they would play on their live gigs in the Boston area. They did record quite a bit of unreleased material -- again, almost all covers. That condition makes the release of a Bourbons CD -- along with tapes of two related, previous bands, the Van-dels' and Chevells -- of very limited interest, no matter how competently the tunes were executed.

The Bourbons - House Party 1964-'66 (Rockin' Sounds from Boston's South Shore)


This is the story of Al Lorusso, a rock & roll journeyman who, during the 1960s, plunked his guitar in three related bands: the Chevells, the Van-dels, and the Bourbons. Lorusso recorded a wealth of material in all three bands, but none of them ever released so much as a local 45 in their respective heydays. But by recording a number of practice sessions on his home tape deck, Lorusso amazingly documented what an average teen combo down the street actually sounded like during this time period. As such, it's a marvelous document of time and place, and the music isn't half bad either. With plenty of Stones, Beatles, and Top 40 favorites along the way, this one's like having an after-school dance in your CD player.

VA - If You're Ready! The Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 2

VA - If You're Ready! The Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 2

This second volume investigating the history of Chicago's best -- and most influential -- teen band label of the mid-'60s comes up with 28 tracks of classic Windy City garage band genius with more emphasis on rarities and unissued material than its initial volume, Oh Yeah! Dunwich was a small concern, run by three jazz heads, who nonetheless managed to tap into Chicago's fertile teen scene of the mid-'60s and get the very best groups down on tape at the city's best studio, Universal. Although "Gloria" by the Shadows of Knight was their only major national hit, they were one of the few labels that steadily catered to this kind of teenage racket; the quality of their releases was very high and many of them have reached legendary status. The Pride and Joy (actually the Del-Vetts) kick things off with the title track and rare Dunwich 45s from the Shadows of Knight ("I'm Gonna Make You Mine," which starts out with a four-chord guitar blast dripping with reverb, distortion, and rock & roll), Things to Come, the Luv'd Ones, Saturday's Children ("You Don't Know Better"), the Rovin' Kind (great covers of "Girl" and John Sebastian's "Didn't Want to Have to Do It"), and the Wanderin' Kind all keeping the disc stuck in high gear. Seven of the tracks here are previously unissued masters, and these, along with radio spots by H.P. Lovecraft and the American Breed -- one of them for Ban deodorant! -- and a rare alternate session take of the Shadows of Knight creaming "I Got My Mojo Working" (originally released on a vinyl album of Dunwich outtakes in the '70s called Early Chicago) make this fine collection a worthwhile addition to anyone's '60s garage band collection. This one literally screams of teen clubs, Rickenbacker guitars, and fake IDs.

VA - If You're Ready! The Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 2


VA - Oh Yeah:Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 1

VA - Oh Yeah:Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 1

The Chicago-based Dunwich Records was the leading Midwestern garage-rock label, turning out countless great singles from the likes of Shadows of Knight, American Breed, the Rovin' Kind, and H.P. Lovecraft. Oh Yeah! The Best of Dunwich Records is an excellent 31-track collection that contains the label's best-known hits, plus several fine unreleased cuts, radio commercials, and interviews. Anyone interested in delving into garage rock any deeper than the Nuggets compilations should start here -- it gives a good idea of both the treasures and the mediocrities to be found in the multitudes of compilations, and few other collections are quite as consistently listenable as this one.

VA - Oh Yeah:Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 1


Classics IV - Spooky (1968)

Classics IV - Spooky (1968)




Anyone who doesn't have a clear image of the Classics IV can be forgiven -- they went through so many shifts in personnel and sound (not to mention a name change after they'd started recording), they were little more than a name attached to some excellent (and very good-selling) records of the second half of the 1960s, without a personality or identity to grab onto easily.
Although they're considered a late-'60s phenomenon, owing to the chronology of their hits, the group can trace its roots back to R&B harmony (i.e., doo wop) music of the late '50s. Detroit-born, Florida-raised Dennis Yost, who joined on drums and moved into the singer's spot, came from a Jacksonville-area band called the Echoes; he was just old enough to remember '50s R&B when it was current and, among many other groups, loved the Five Satins; and in addition to playing the skins, he sometimes liked to sing when the calls came for a '50s number like "In the Still of the Night." After his own group broke up in the mid-'60s, Yost joined a band called Leroy & the Moments, which included Wally Eaton (bass, vocals), James Cobb (guitar), and Joe Wilson (keyboards). His arrival, along with the changing times, also signaled a change in the group's name -- as there was no "Leroy" anyway, that could go, and the Moments was already taken, so, taking their lead from Yost's Classic-model drum kit, they became the Classics.
Their sound was extremely diverse by all accounts -- they could cover most of the Top 40 note-perfect, which was ideal for audiences in Jacksonville but didn't necessarily give them much to work with as a recording act. Part of their act included a tribute to the Four Seasons, who were still burning up the charts in those days -- and, though they had a history that went back much further, were a lot like the Classics in that they could sing anything and were also a virtually self-contained unit instrumentally -- and when the group was signed to Capitol Records in 1966, they made their debut that fall with a Joe South song called "Pollyanna"; the single was virtually a faux-Four Seasons record in style and sound, and it was just different and fresh enough that it might have done well, except that the management of the actual Four Seasons reportedly took offense, and did their best to keep "Pollyanna"'s presence to a minimum on the New York airwaves; and to top it off, the group was threatened with legal action by a Brooklyn-based vocal outfit called the Classics, who'd already charted a single.
Thus, Florida's Classics became the Classics IV, and for all of that trouble, their debut record fizzled at number 103 on the charts. "Pollyanna" might have made a good debut in 1966, but releasing a remake of the Diamonds' 1950s hit "Little Darlin'" -- produced by Joe South -- in January of 1967 was plain bad timing for a good record that had no place to go (ironically, two years or so later, with the nostalgia craze starting to kick in, that might have been another story). The record was actually more important for its B-side, which had a faux-Righteous Brothers song called "Nothing to Lose," co-authored by guitarist James Cobb and Buddy Buie, who would soon take on a much bigger role; it was also sung by Cobb and Yost, subbing for Bill Medley and Bobby Hatfield. By that time, the group had also relocated to Atlanta, and were unbowed in their quest for success, despite the end of the first recording deal.
Their Capitol contract was behind them by the spring of 1967, and the following summer the group moved on to Imperial Records. Once a home to New Orleans-based R&B stars like Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew, Imperial had been absorbed into Liberty Records and was now a much more pop/rock-oriented operation, the imprint even being used for the early U.S. releases of records by the Hollies. It was at this point that things started going the group's way, when Buie and Cobb heard an instrumental entitled "Spooky," and came up with words for it, and a new arrangement by Cobb. The record, released in September of 1967, broke out in Louisville, KY, and began getting picked up by stations around the country, building slowly to a number three national hit that winter of 1967-1968. Suddenly there was a serious future in the offing for the Classics IV -- but not for Cobb as a member, nor for Yost as a drummer. The sudden infusion of royalty money on the shared copyright of "Spooky" eliminated the need for Cobb to remain as the group's guitarist; and suddenly Yost's position behind the kit on what was now a very heavy national touring schedule became untenable. Cobb kept writing and also sometimes doing the group's arrangements with Buie (who became the producer of the Classics IV), alternating with official arranger Emory Gordy; but he gave up playing on-stage with the band, preferring the less draining life of a session guitarist, and was replaced in the lineup by Auburn Burrell; and Yost stepped up to the microphone full-time while Kim Venable took over on the drums. They were no longer, strictly speaking, the "Classics IV" but that hardly mattered, as the band's lineup situation quickly got a lot more complicated.
As they were now a national-level act with an audience across a continent, it was decided by Buie and Imperial that there was no reason to limit themselves to the talents -- fine as they might've been -- of the actual members when it came to the sounds on their records. In place of the members, apart from group alumnus Cobb, the Classics IV's records soon began featuring some of Atlanta's top session musicians, among them drummer Robert Nix, while the touring membership included Dean Daughtry and Bill Gilmore on keyboards and bass, respectively, all late of Roy Orbison's band the Candymen. All of these personnel shifts, coupled with a bumper crop of Cobb/Buie songs, made for a strong debut album, entitled Spooky. The only problem, in retrospect, was that the sounds were too diverse -- it was hard to pin down an identity for the Classics IV, listening to the album, and given the diversity of personnel it's not surprising. Among top American groups, the Beach Boys also relied on session musicians after 1964, but they always made sure Carl Wilson's guitar was there, and their voices were easily recognizable. Apart from Yost's singing, there wasn't a lot of unity in the Classics IV's sound.
Their next couple of singles, "Soul Train" and "Mamas and Papas," didn't do more than a fraction of the business done by "Spooky," though the group was permitted to record a second LP, which failed to sell in any serious numbers, at least initially. One song off of the album, entitled "Stormy," was given a single release and suddenly the group was back in the Top Five in the fall of 1968, and for the first time also made the easy listening charts as well. They made a return visit, this time all the way to the number two spot, in the winter of 1969 with "Traces," another Cobb/Buie collaboration, this time with help from arranger Emory Gordy. The group's longevity seemed assured, but an interesting shift had taken place in their output across the preceding two years -- they'd gone from being a solid rock & roll cover band to delivering a much softer, more laid-back pop/rock sound with a Southern flavor but not a lot of wattage, and closer in spirit to, say, the work of Roy Orbison circa 1967-1968 than to what was considered rock music in 1969-1970. And their singles, although they still made the pop (i.e., rock) charts, were starting to place higher numbers on the easy listening (i.e., pop) charts, on records such as "Everyday With You Girl," which reached number 19 as a rock single and number 12 on the easy listening charts in 1969.
Amid this flurry of activity, the group's name was changed in the new decade, so that they were known officially as Dennis Yost & the Classics IV. Their chart action declined throughout 1971, however, amid the changing tastes of the public, and the reorganization of their record label -- which had merged with United Artists -- made the environment at Liberty inhospitable. Dennis Yost and the Classics IV shifted to MGM Records in 1972 and lasted through one album and a last pop hit, with "What Am I Crying For," along with a string of attempts through 1975. By that time, Cobb, Daughtry, and Buie had split off to form the Atlanta Rhythm Section. At that point Dennis Yost went solo, or tried to -- meanwhile, their ex-studio band emerged as the Atlanta Rhythm Section and, amid all of their other successes, enjoyed a new hit with "Spooky" in 1979, while Santana returned "Stormy" to the charts. Meanwhile, Yost became a fixture on the oldies circuit alongside his one-time Imperial labelmate Gary Lewis and other denizens of the mid-'60s singles charts, and also wrote songs and became a producer. He also secured the exclusive rights to the group name, and continued to perform into the early 21st century.




Classics IV - Spooky (1968)

Classics IV - Spooky (1968)

Clocking in at less than 26 minutes, Buddy Buie produced and arranged this set of 11 songs, four co-written by the producer and lead guitarist J.R. Cobb, the team that would eventually become mayor components of the Atlanta Rhythm Section. ARS would have a Top 20 hit with "Spooky" in 1979, but it was this version which launched Classics IV, a Top Three January hit, to start off 1968. Their name sounding like some kind of automobile, lead singer Dennis Yost would get his name added front and center on the marquee by the end of the year when the group hit again with the Top Five "Stormy," not on this album. What is here are covers of John Stewart's answer to Neil Diamond's "I'm a Believer" -- a unique look at the Monkees' number one "Daydream Believer," renditions of "You Are My Sunshine," Wayne Carson Thompson's "The Letter" which Al Stoffel's stiff liner notes call "hard rock" (it isn't), a laid-back Zombies-esque take on the Hollies/Herman's Hermits' classic "Bus Stop" without Colin Blunstone's genius, and the original tunes which show some songwriting skill, but are hardly memorable. The Strawberry Alarm Clock-inspired "Book a Trip" emerges as the best of the original bunch, but pales next to "Spooky." Only four members of the quintet are shown in the back cover photo, and like Bobby Hebb's Sunny album, there's a woman on the front cover, not the artist. "...A raving James Brown and a mellow Johnny Mathis" is how Al Stoffel describes "a group sound that concentrates on the vocals more than instruments and centers on a lead singer who sounds like a different guy on every song." That's because unless Dennis Yost, who is not even credited on the album jacket or in the liners, is a true chameleon, it is a variety of singers. "You Are My Sunshine" and "The Letter" go for a Mitch Ryder sound, predicting the style future Atlanta Rhythm Section singer Ronnie Hammond would force upon us. Glen Campbell and Jimmy Webb should've sued for this lame rendition of "By the Time I Get to Phoenix," in fact, the vocal is so insincere the girl the singer is leaving would no doubt send a Thank You note by the time he did get to Phoenix. Dreadful. It does sound like Dennis Yost on Little Anthony's "Goin' Out of My Head," as the eerie, atmospheric backing vocals from "Spooky" find their way here and onto "Just Between You and Me" as well. "Mary, Mary Row Your Boat" is not the Monkees' "Mary, Mary"-meets-Every Mother's Son, but it does sport more decent backup vocals. Classics IV had the opportunity to be as hip as the Box Tops, but unfortunately, this album feels like a pastiche, and like the group, misses the mark. Classics IV would eventually be defined by their hit singles and Dennis Yost's middle of the road voice, four of their five chart songs happening in less than a year-and-a-half after "Spooky"'s debut.

Classics IV - Spooky (1968)

The Knack  - Time Waits For No One (The Complete Recordings)The Turtles - 20 Greatest Hits The Fifth Estate (D-Men) - Ding Dong! The Witch Is Back! (1964-1969)The Esquires - Flashin' RedThe British Walkers ‎– Shake / That Was Yesterday (1967)Friar Tuck - Friar Tuck and his Psychedelic Guitar (1967)The Bourbons - House Party 1964-'66 (Rockin' Sounds from Boston's South Shore)VA - If You're Ready! The Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 2VA - Oh Yeah:Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 1Classics IV - Spooky (1968)

Report "Old Melodies ..."

Are you sure you want to report this post for ?

Cancel
×