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The British Walkers ‎– Shake / That Was Yesterday (1967)

The British Walkers ‎– Shake / That Was Yesterday (1967)

The British Walkers weren’t actually British. They were an American band whose sound was influenced by The Rolling Stones, The Who, and The Kinks. Forming in 1964, The British Walkers lasted only four years, breaking up in 1968.


A.British Walkers-Shake                                     
B. British Walkers - That Was Yesterday                     
Bonus 1. British Walkers - Diddley Daddy                    
Bonus 2. British Walkers - The Story Of My Life             
Bonus 3. .British Walkers- Watch Yourself                   
Bonus 4.. British Walkers - Bad Lightning                   
Bonus 5. British Walkers - I Found You 

WANTED : The British Walkers Are Coming

The British Walkers ‎– Shake / That Was Yesterday (1967)

The British Walkers ‎– Shake / That Was Yesterday (1967)



Friar Tuck - Friar Tuck and his Psychedelic Guitar (1967)

Friar Tuck - Friar Tuck and his Psychedelic Guitar (1967)

It would be all too easy to simply write this off as a mere exploitation knock-off designed to catch naive hippies. It certainly is that, but it also has the hand (and voice) of Curt Boettcher all over it, and it features Mike Deasy, heavy L.A. session cat and sometime-member of Phil Spector's Wrecking Crew on guitar, musical arrangements and producing. Consisting of about half covers and half originals, the album could hardly be considered truly psychedelic (mostly thanks to the Boettcher vocals) but it is quite interesting in its own way. Deasy's arrangements are strange and wonderful with some hot guitar playing and liberal use of the echoplex. He gives "Louie Louie," the quintessential simple rock & roll tune, a wildly elaborate arrangement, virtually re-creating the tune entirely. He gives Nat Adderly and Oscar Brown, Jr.'s "Work Song" an echoplex and guitar intro, inserts a bit of twang then goes into a classical sounding passage and back. Oddly enough, it also sounds reminiscent of the Count Five's "Psychotic Reaction"! Deasy's ultra-stoned sounding vocals on "Alley Oop" are hilarious. The originals can't be called instrumentals due to Boettcher and company's ever present wordless vocals, which get really bizarre on "Fendabenda Ha Ha Ha" and "Where Did Your Mind Go?." [These tracks are a really odd combination of gonzo guitar soloing and the Living Voices on acid. The bonus tracks by the Flower Pot have actual lyrics and are less elaborately arranged than the Friar Tuck album, and have quite a different feel to them. "Black Moto" and "Wantin' Ain't Gettin" even have some sitar. Originally issued as 45 rpms, they're a nice addition and it makes sense to gather Deasy's originals all in one place. All in all, Friar Tuck & His Psychedelic Guitar is a thoroughly entertaining curiosity. [This album was reissued in 2007 with four bonus tracks from the Flower Pot.]


Friar Tuck - Friar Tuck and his Psychedelic Guitar (1967)

Friar Tuck was a stage name for L.A. session guitarist Mike Deasy. The Friar Tuck album is essentially a Mike Deasy solo album made with the help of Deasy's studio friends. The March 1996 edition of Guitar Player Magazine lists the Friar Tuck album as being in Jimi Hendrix' personal record collection.

The Bourbons - House Party 1964-'66 (Rockin' Sounds from Boston's South Shore)

The Bourbons - House Party 1964-'66 (Rockin' Sounds from Boston's South Shore)

An extremely typical garage band of the mid-'60s, the Bourbons never released a record. Their set consisted almost entirely of faithful covers of current rock hits, which they would play on their live gigs in the Boston area. They did record quite a bit of unreleased material -- again, almost all covers. That condition makes the release of a Bourbons CD -- along with tapes of two related, previous bands, the Van-dels' and Chevells -- of very limited interest, no matter how competently the tunes were executed.

The Bourbons - House Party 1964-'66 (Rockin' Sounds from Boston's South Shore)


This is the story of Al Lorusso, a rock & roll journeyman who, during the 1960s, plunked his guitar in three related bands: the Chevells, the Van-dels, and the Bourbons. Lorusso recorded a wealth of material in all three bands, but none of them ever released so much as a local 45 in their respective heydays. But by recording a number of practice sessions on his home tape deck, Lorusso amazingly documented what an average teen combo down the street actually sounded like during this time period. As such, it's a marvelous document of time and place, and the music isn't half bad either. With plenty of Stones, Beatles, and Top 40 favorites along the way, this one's like having an after-school dance in your CD player.

VA - If You're Ready! The Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 2

VA - If You're Ready! The Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 2

This second volume investigating the history of Chicago's best -- and most influential -- teen band label of the mid-'60s comes up with 28 tracks of classic Windy City garage band genius with more emphasis on rarities and unissued material than its initial volume, Oh Yeah! Dunwich was a small concern, run by three jazz heads, who nonetheless managed to tap into Chicago's fertile teen scene of the mid-'60s and get the very best groups down on tape at the city's best studio, Universal. Although "Gloria" by the Shadows of Knight was their only major national hit, they were one of the few labels that steadily catered to this kind of teenage racket; the quality of their releases was very high and many of them have reached legendary status. The Pride and Joy (actually the Del-Vetts) kick things off with the title track and rare Dunwich 45s from the Shadows of Knight ("I'm Gonna Make You Mine," which starts out with a four-chord guitar blast dripping with reverb, distortion, and rock & roll), Things to Come, the Luv'd Ones, Saturday's Children ("You Don't Know Better"), the Rovin' Kind (great covers of "Girl" and John Sebastian's "Didn't Want to Have to Do It"), and the Wanderin' Kind all keeping the disc stuck in high gear. Seven of the tracks here are previously unissued masters, and these, along with radio spots by H.P. Lovecraft and the American Breed -- one of them for Ban deodorant! -- and a rare alternate session take of the Shadows of Knight creaming "I Got My Mojo Working" (originally released on a vinyl album of Dunwich outtakes in the '70s called Early Chicago) make this fine collection a worthwhile addition to anyone's '60s garage band collection. This one literally screams of teen clubs, Rickenbacker guitars, and fake IDs.

VA - If You're Ready! The Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 2


VA - Oh Yeah:Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 1

VA - Oh Yeah:Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 1

The Chicago-based Dunwich Records was the leading Midwestern garage-rock label, turning out countless great singles from the likes of Shadows of Knight, American Breed, the Rovin' Kind, and H.P. Lovecraft. Oh Yeah! The Best of Dunwich Records is an excellent 31-track collection that contains the label's best-known hits, plus several fine unreleased cuts, radio commercials, and interviews. Anyone interested in delving into garage rock any deeper than the Nuggets compilations should start here -- it gives a good idea of both the treasures and the mediocrities to be found in the multitudes of compilations, and few other collections are quite as consistently listenable as this one.

VA - Oh Yeah:Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 1


Classics IV - Spooky (1968)

Classics IV - Spooky (1968)




Anyone who doesn't have a clear image of the Classics IV can be forgiven -- they went through so many shifts in personnel and sound (not to mention a name change after they'd started recording), they were little more than a name attached to some excellent (and very good-selling) records of the second half of the 1960s, without a personality or identity to grab onto easily.
Although they're considered a late-'60s phenomenon, owing to the chronology of their hits, the group can trace its roots back to R&B harmony (i.e., doo wop) music of the late '50s. Detroit-born, Florida-raised Dennis Yost, who joined on drums and moved into the singer's spot, came from a Jacksonville-area band called the Echoes; he was just old enough to remember '50s R&B when it was current and, among many other groups, loved the Five Satins; and in addition to playing the skins, he sometimes liked to sing when the calls came for a '50s number like "In the Still of the Night." After his own group broke up in the mid-'60s, Yost joined a band called Leroy & the Moments, which included Wally Eaton (bass, vocals), James Cobb (guitar), and Joe Wilson (keyboards). His arrival, along with the changing times, also signaled a change in the group's name -- as there was no "Leroy" anyway, that could go, and the Moments was already taken, so, taking their lead from Yost's Classic-model drum kit, they became the Classics.
Their sound was extremely diverse by all accounts -- they could cover most of the Top 40 note-perfect, which was ideal for audiences in Jacksonville but didn't necessarily give them much to work with as a recording act. Part of their act included a tribute to the Four Seasons, who were still burning up the charts in those days -- and, though they had a history that went back much further, were a lot like the Classics in that they could sing anything and were also a virtually self-contained unit instrumentally -- and when the group was signed to Capitol Records in 1966, they made their debut that fall with a Joe South song called "Pollyanna"; the single was virtually a faux-Four Seasons record in style and sound, and it was just different and fresh enough that it might have done well, except that the management of the actual Four Seasons reportedly took offense, and did their best to keep "Pollyanna"'s presence to a minimum on the New York airwaves; and to top it off, the group was threatened with legal action by a Brooklyn-based vocal outfit called the Classics, who'd already charted a single.
Thus, Florida's Classics became the Classics IV, and for all of that trouble, their debut record fizzled at number 103 on the charts. "Pollyanna" might have made a good debut in 1966, but releasing a remake of the Diamonds' 1950s hit "Little Darlin'" -- produced by Joe South -- in January of 1967 was plain bad timing for a good record that had no place to go (ironically, two years or so later, with the nostalgia craze starting to kick in, that might have been another story). The record was actually more important for its B-side, which had a faux-Righteous Brothers song called "Nothing to Lose," co-authored by guitarist James Cobb and Buddy Buie, who would soon take on a much bigger role; it was also sung by Cobb and Yost, subbing for Bill Medley and Bobby Hatfield. By that time, the group had also relocated to Atlanta, and were unbowed in their quest for success, despite the end of the first recording deal.
Their Capitol contract was behind them by the spring of 1967, and the following summer the group moved on to Imperial Records. Once a home to New Orleans-based R&B stars like Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew, Imperial had been absorbed into Liberty Records and was now a much more pop/rock-oriented operation, the imprint even being used for the early U.S. releases of records by the Hollies. It was at this point that things started going the group's way, when Buie and Cobb heard an instrumental entitled "Spooky," and came up with words for it, and a new arrangement by Cobb. The record, released in September of 1967, broke out in Louisville, KY, and began getting picked up by stations around the country, building slowly to a number three national hit that winter of 1967-1968. Suddenly there was a serious future in the offing for the Classics IV -- but not for Cobb as a member, nor for Yost as a drummer. The sudden infusion of royalty money on the shared copyright of "Spooky" eliminated the need for Cobb to remain as the group's guitarist; and suddenly Yost's position behind the kit on what was now a very heavy national touring schedule became untenable. Cobb kept writing and also sometimes doing the group's arrangements with Buie (who became the producer of the Classics IV), alternating with official arranger Emory Gordy; but he gave up playing on-stage with the band, preferring the less draining life of a session guitarist, and was replaced in the lineup by Auburn Burrell; and Yost stepped up to the microphone full-time while Kim Venable took over on the drums. They were no longer, strictly speaking, the "Classics IV" but that hardly mattered, as the band's lineup situation quickly got a lot more complicated.
As they were now a national-level act with an audience across a continent, it was decided by Buie and Imperial that there was no reason to limit themselves to the talents -- fine as they might've been -- of the actual members when it came to the sounds on their records. In place of the members, apart from group alumnus Cobb, the Classics IV's records soon began featuring some of Atlanta's top session musicians, among them drummer Robert Nix, while the touring membership included Dean Daughtry and Bill Gilmore on keyboards and bass, respectively, all late of Roy Orbison's band the Candymen. All of these personnel shifts, coupled with a bumper crop of Cobb/Buie songs, made for a strong debut album, entitled Spooky. The only problem, in retrospect, was that the sounds were too diverse -- it was hard to pin down an identity for the Classics IV, listening to the album, and given the diversity of personnel it's not surprising. Among top American groups, the Beach Boys also relied on session musicians after 1964, but they always made sure Carl Wilson's guitar was there, and their voices were easily recognizable. Apart from Yost's singing, there wasn't a lot of unity in the Classics IV's sound.
Their next couple of singles, "Soul Train" and "Mamas and Papas," didn't do more than a fraction of the business done by "Spooky," though the group was permitted to record a second LP, which failed to sell in any serious numbers, at least initially. One song off of the album, entitled "Stormy," was given a single release and suddenly the group was back in the Top Five in the fall of 1968, and for the first time also made the easy listening charts as well. They made a return visit, this time all the way to the number two spot, in the winter of 1969 with "Traces," another Cobb/Buie collaboration, this time with help from arranger Emory Gordy. The group's longevity seemed assured, but an interesting shift had taken place in their output across the preceding two years -- they'd gone from being a solid rock & roll cover band to delivering a much softer, more laid-back pop/rock sound with a Southern flavor but not a lot of wattage, and closer in spirit to, say, the work of Roy Orbison circa 1967-1968 than to what was considered rock music in 1969-1970. And their singles, although they still made the pop (i.e., rock) charts, were starting to place higher numbers on the easy listening (i.e., pop) charts, on records such as "Everyday With You Girl," which reached number 19 as a rock single and number 12 on the easy listening charts in 1969.
Amid this flurry of activity, the group's name was changed in the new decade, so that they were known officially as Dennis Yost & the Classics IV. Their chart action declined throughout 1971, however, amid the changing tastes of the public, and the reorganization of their record label -- which had merged with United Artists -- made the environment at Liberty inhospitable. Dennis Yost and the Classics IV shifted to MGM Records in 1972 and lasted through one album and a last pop hit, with "What Am I Crying For," along with a string of attempts through 1975. By that time, Cobb, Daughtry, and Buie had split off to form the Atlanta Rhythm Section. At that point Dennis Yost went solo, or tried to -- meanwhile, their ex-studio band emerged as the Atlanta Rhythm Section and, amid all of their other successes, enjoyed a new hit with "Spooky" in 1979, while Santana returned "Stormy" to the charts. Meanwhile, Yost became a fixture on the oldies circuit alongside his one-time Imperial labelmate Gary Lewis and other denizens of the mid-'60s singles charts, and also wrote songs and became a producer. He also secured the exclusive rights to the group name, and continued to perform into the early 21st century.




Classics IV - Spooky (1968)

Classics IV - Spooky (1968)

Clocking in at less than 26 minutes, Buddy Buie produced and arranged this set of 11 songs, four co-written by the producer and lead guitarist J.R. Cobb, the team that would eventually become mayor components of the Atlanta Rhythm Section. ARS would have a Top 20 hit with "Spooky" in 1979, but it was this version which launched Classics IV, a Top Three January hit, to start off 1968. Their name sounding like some kind of automobile, lead singer Dennis Yost would get his name added front and center on the marquee by the end of the year when the group hit again with the Top Five "Stormy," not on this album. What is here are covers of John Stewart's answer to Neil Diamond's "I'm a Believer" -- a unique look at the Monkees' number one "Daydream Believer," renditions of "You Are My Sunshine," Wayne Carson Thompson's "The Letter" which Al Stoffel's stiff liner notes call "hard rock" (it isn't), a laid-back Zombies-esque take on the Hollies/Herman's Hermits' classic "Bus Stop" without Colin Blunstone's genius, and the original tunes which show some songwriting skill, but are hardly memorable. The Strawberry Alarm Clock-inspired "Book a Trip" emerges as the best of the original bunch, but pales next to "Spooky." Only four members of the quintet are shown in the back cover photo, and like Bobby Hebb's Sunny album, there's a woman on the front cover, not the artist. "...A raving James Brown and a mellow Johnny Mathis" is how Al Stoffel describes "a group sound that concentrates on the vocals more than instruments and centers on a lead singer who sounds like a different guy on every song." That's because unless Dennis Yost, who is not even credited on the album jacket or in the liners, is a true chameleon, it is a variety of singers. "You Are My Sunshine" and "The Letter" go for a Mitch Ryder sound, predicting the style future Atlanta Rhythm Section singer Ronnie Hammond would force upon us. Glen Campbell and Jimmy Webb should've sued for this lame rendition of "By the Time I Get to Phoenix," in fact, the vocal is so insincere the girl the singer is leaving would no doubt send a Thank You note by the time he did get to Phoenix. Dreadful. It does sound like Dennis Yost on Little Anthony's "Goin' Out of My Head," as the eerie, atmospheric backing vocals from "Spooky" find their way here and onto "Just Between You and Me" as well. "Mary, Mary Row Your Boat" is not the Monkees' "Mary, Mary"-meets-Every Mother's Son, but it does sport more decent backup vocals. Classics IV had the opportunity to be as hip as the Box Tops, but unfortunately, this album feels like a pastiche, and like the group, misses the mark. Classics IV would eventually be defined by their hit singles and Dennis Yost's middle of the road voice, four of their five chart songs happening in less than a year-and-a-half after "Spooky"'s debut.

Classics IV - Spooky (1968)

The Miracles - The Fabulous Miracles (1963)

The Miracles - The Fabulous Miracles (1963)


One of the earliest of all Motown groups The Miracles were formed at school in Detroit in 1955 as The Five Chimes. In 1956 they changed their name to The Matadors, adding Claudette Rogers to the line-up. They were spotted by Berry Gordy at an audition in late 1957 and in February 1958 changed their name to The Miracles. Their first release, 'Get A Job' b/w 'My Mama Done Told Me', was issued via the End label that same month. Another single on End followed, and then one on Chess and Motown, before the group finally found a home on Tamla where they had a string of hits and Smokey established himself as a key songwriter for the label throughout the 1960s. 

In late 1965 Berry Gordy decided to adjust the group's name and they were billed thereafter as Smokey Robinson & The Miracles, until Smokey left the group in July 1972 (although the final Smokey Robinson & The Miracles single was not released until November). He was replaced by Billy Griffin, with the name being reverted back to The Miracles for the new line-up. 

The Miracles stayed with Motown until 1976, and had a number one US hit with 'Love Machine' in 1975. In 1976 they moved to Columbia. 

Members: 
William "Smokey" Robinson (1955–1972) 
Ronald "Ronnie" White (1955–1983; 1993–1995) 
Warren "Pete" Moore (1955–1978) 
Clarence Dawson (1955) 
James Grice (1955) 
Emerson Rogers (1956) 
Robert "Bobby" Rogers (1956–1983; 1993–2013) 
Claudette Rogers (Robinson) (1956–1964) 
Billy Griffin (1972–1978; late 1990s) 
Dave Finley (1978–1983; 1993–present) 
Sidney Justin (1993–c.2000) 
Tee Turner (1996–present) 
Mark Scott (2005–2008) 
Alphonse Franklin (2008-present)

The Miracles - The Fabulous Miracles (1963)


Harmony Grass - This Is Us (1969)


Harmony Grass - This Is Us (1969)

Harmony Grass was a British sunshine pop group briefly active in the late 1960s. 
The group was formed in Essex by previous members of Tony Rivers & the Castaways, including Rivers himself. They signed to RCA Records about a year after they formed, and their single "Move in a Little Closer" hit No. 24 on the UK Singles Chart in January 1969. They released one album, This Is Us, in 1969, on the RCA label, and performed in the UK, including at London's Marquee Club, but had broken up by 1970.

Harmony Grass - This Is Us (1969)




Tony Rivers & The Castaways - Birth Of Harmonies

Tony Rivers & The Castaways - Birth Of Harmonies


Tony Rivers and the Castaways started life as the Cutaways in Dagenham, Essex, approximately 1960. The early line-up was, Vic Larkins & Micky Johnson, gtrs, Ray Brown, bass, and Brian 'Shirt' Talbot on drums. Lead singer at one time, was Bobby Rio, (who later went on to record with Joe Meek). I became lead singer at the end of 1961, having been approached by Ray Brown, and other members of the group, who had been watching me get up to sing with a group at the Cherry Tree pub in Dagenham on a Sunday lunchtime. I’d never been in a group at that time, but I had met the lead singer whilst I was working at Butlins’ Holiday Camp in Clacton. He was on holiday with 'Terry Venables' (who one day would become the England Football manager), he told me that he sang in a group (Joe & the Teens) that played every Sunday lunchtime, at a pub in Dagenham, and when I finished the Butlins’ season, I should go and see them play, which I did. I'd get up and sing two songs, while he walked round the pub with a pint glass, collecting money for the group! Ray Brown asked me if I fancied singing with his group, ‘the Cutaways’ at the Royal Oak pub that night, I said yes, and although there were more people on stage, than in the audience, I enjoyed it enough to say yes again, when they asked if I'd like to join the group. This was probably the first real step I'd taken on the road to being a 'singer'!! I'd taken a couple of small steps during my time at Butlins’, like the occasional 'guest spot' with the Terry Young Six, who played the Rock' n 'Calypso ballroom every night. This was a very good group with some members who went on to better things later, such as, John Rostill, who, not too long after, joined the Shadows and had many hits with them, and even went on to write BIG HITS for artists like, Olivia Newton John, and a certain Elvis Presley. This was also my first meeting with Bruce Baxter, lead guitar, playing all those James Burton 'licks', and who I was to work with many times in the 70's. I also made an appearance at a dance hall in Clacton. My friend, Jock Smith and I had gone to see a group called Dave Curtis and the Tremors (a good 60's name) and I said I'd like to get up and sing with them. Now I needed a name. Tony Thompson was, and is my real name, but that didn't sound cool enough for rock'n'roll. I ended up with the name Rivers. We took this from a Decca records chart that was on the wall. No.6 was Pat Boone’s 'Moody River'. That's how I got the name. I was introduced on stage later, "All the way from London -Tony Rivers"! So now I’m in Tony Rivers and the Cutaways, playing pubs and clubs etc. Every now and then though, we'd play a lunchtime session at the Merry Fiddlers pub, pack our equipment into our van, and head off to the Granada Theatre at East Ham or Walthamstow to play between the films! I'd seen Buddy Holly with the Crickets, on both these stages, this was big stuff! Clem Cattini was always on these gigs, playing drums, with Roger LaVern on organ, us on one side of the stage, another band on the other side, Clem and Roger in the middle, half of the Tornadoes to be!! We'd all play alternately! Bizarre! It could never happen these days, but then, anything was possible. Many years later, Clem, who had now, become a top session drummer, and I, would be working together on several different things i.e. when I became a producer at CBS records in the early 70's, he was one of the CBS 'mafia', and was one of the musicians Mike Smith, head of A/R told me I had to book for the sessions. No wonder all those CBS records sounded the same! A few years after that, we recorded together again, with Cliff Richard, on ‘Devil Woman’ and other hits, and even ended up in Cliffs' band together, for a while. 

The Castaways first manager was a great fellow called Benny Cooper, a former drummer with the ‘Squadronnaires’. He made sure we acted professionally and rehearsed hard (wife Joyce keeping us supplied with tea and coffee), these were good lessons to learn and stayed with me. Ask any of the Castaways! We turned 'professional' within 8 months of my joining the band, bought a van, painted out the words on the side ‘Passingham’s Pork Sausages’ and in claret and blue (of course) wrote Tony Rivers and the Castaways! Our first trip in the van was, our first 'tour of Scotland'. The trouble was, after about a couple of miles of leaving home, the boys in the back were hammering on the sides to stop. We hadn't realised that it was a sealed unit when the doors closed! No one could breathe. We had to break a tiny window in the rear door to let air in. We'd only gone up the road and Scotland seemed a long way off. We didn't even know where it was! Great days! Terry Oates became our manager around this time and got us our first ‘recording tests’ at Decca, and then EMI. 

The line-up for the recording tests was, Ray Brown, Vic Larkins, ‘Shirt’, Mickey Johnson and me on lead vocals, in other words, TR & the Cutaways. We recorded two tunes, one was, the Ricky Nelson version of 'Summertime' and the other was, 'Peter Gunn'. I found out later that Terry Oates wanted us to be an instrumental group, like the Shadows! Where would that have left me? I've never let him forget that! I think it was Terry who suggested we change our name to the Castaways, which sounded better with Tony Rivers, (not that you'd get shipwrecked up a river, would you?) It seemed to work. We must have passed the 'test' and were given a recording date in Abbey Rd Studios, and told which songs our A&R manager (John Burgess) had found for us to record, we rehearsed 'til we knew them backwards, then---- Abbey Rd!! Not that Abbey Rd studio’s in those days, had the reputation that it was to gain from the phonomenal success of ‘The Beatles’, but for us, a daunting prospect nevertheless. 

****


http://www.craftweb.org/web/tony/cast_disc.html

In 1968 the band disbanded and Rivers formed Harmony Grass with former band mates. Their single "Move in a Little Closer" reached No. 24 on the UK Singles Chart in January 1969. They released one album, This Is Us, on RCA, and gave concerts in the UK (including at London's Marquee Club).[5] Rivers left to go solo in 1970.

Tony Rivers & The Castaways - Birth Of Harmonies  (Compilation1998)

Tony Rivers & The Castaways - Birth Of Harmonies

Tony Rivers & The Castaways - Birth Of Harmonies

Tony Rivers & The Castaways - Birth Of Harmonies

Tony Rivers & The Castaways - Birth Of Harmonies

Tony Rivers & The Castaways - Birth Of Harmonies

Tony Rivers & The Castaways - Birth Of Harmonies




The Tradewinds - Excursions (1967)

The Tradewinds - Excursions (1967)


The Trade Winds was an American pop group formed in Providence, Rhode Island. The group's members were Peter Andreoli (aka Peter Anders) and Vincent Poncia, Jr., and had previously had a hit single together (with a third member, Norman Marzano) under the name The Videls with a song called "Mr. Lonely", which hit #73 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1960. 
After a few single releases, The Videls folded, and Anders and Poncia began writing tunes with Phil Spector for groups such as The Ronettes and The Crystals. Recording under the name The Tradewinds in 1965, they released several singles and scored two more U.S. hits, "New York's a Lonely Town" (#32, 1965) and the psychedelic-tinged "Mind Excursion" (#51, 1966). In 1966 they changed their name to The Innocence, recorded a full-length eponymous album, and had two hit singles, "There's Got to Be a Word!" (U.S. #34, 1966 and "Mairzy Doats" (U.S. #75, 1967). Following the LP release the duo released another album under the name Anders & Poncia on Warner Bros. Records in 1969, and shortly after broke up.

Poncia later went on to produce material for artists such as Ringo Starr, Melissa Manchester and Kiss.

The group was mentioned on an episode of Mad Men (Season 5 Episode 3).

The Tradewinds - Excursions (1967)

The Tradewinds - Excursions (1967)

The Tradewinds - Excursions (1967)

Thanks Cor...

The British Walkers ‎– Shake / That Was Yesterday (1967)Friar Tuck - Friar Tuck and his Psychedelic Guitar (1967)The Bourbons - House Party 1964-'66 (Rockin' Sounds from Boston's South Shore)VA - If You're Ready! The Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 2VA - Oh Yeah:Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 1Classics IV - Spooky (1968)The Miracles - The Fabulous Miracles (1963)Harmony Grass - This Is Us (1969)Tony Rivers & The Castaways - Birth Of Harmonies The Tradewinds - Excursions (1967)

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