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The Duprees - Columbia Singles

The Duprees - Columbia Singles

The Duprees are an American musical group of doo-wop style who had a series of hit records in the early 1960s.

The Duprees - Columbia Singles



Rock ‘n’ roll doowop group from Jersey City, New Jersey, USA. The Duprees specialized in recording updated versions of old pop hits in a smooth style with a slight rock ‘n’ roll feel. The original line-up featured lead vocalist Joey Vann (real name Joseph Canzano, April 3, 1943 - February 28, 1984), Michael Arnone (September 1942 - October 27, 2005), John Salvato (July 19, 1940), Tom Bialoglow (November 5, 1940) and Joseph Santollo (July 23, 1943 - June 4, 1981). Michael Kelly twice replaced Joey Vann during the group's history.




The Duprees - Columbia Singles

The Duprees - Columbia Singles

The Duprees - Columbia Singles

The Duprees - Columbia Singles

The Duprees - Columbia Singles

The Duprees - Columbia Singles

The Duprees - Columbia Singles

The James Boys - Columbia Singles

The James Boys - Columbia Singles


The James boys were a duo which consisted of Donny Marchand and Harry Giosaso 

The James Boys - Columbia Singles

The James Boys - Columbia Singles

The James Boys - Columbia Singles

The James Boys - Columbia Singles

It was first mentioned in the January 22, 1966 edition of Billboard magazine where the A side of this single was predicted to reach the top 60 . The A side was "Hitbound" on WERX Grand Rapids, Michigan on April 4th, 1966, however. The record was independently produced by Morty Craft and Joe Scott, and Morty sold the record to Columbia in a production deal. Billboard reported the group member's names at the time as Donny Marchand and Harry Giosaso (and in a later issue calling him Harry Grosai). However Harry's name was inaccurate. His real name was Aristides Michael "Harry" Giosasi, and in doing research for this video I discovered that he had passed away January 2, 2010. Harry had quite a career in music, discovering the Impalas and co-writing the song Sorry (I Ran All The Way Home) with Artie Zwirn, and he also was half of the singing duo Gino and Gina ("Pretty Baby") with his sister, Irene Robison. The James Boys had one follow up 45 on Columbia, Keep The Fire Burning b/w That Misty Look (Columbia 4-43717) and according to Billboard were signed to Mercury as both artists and writers however they did not release anything on the label. Harry later went on to become a successful restaurateur and remained in that business until his passing. Donny Marchand had at least one single issued on two labels with two B sides (at least one of the labels was Morty Craft's own Craft label), and he now resides in the UK.

The Denims - Columbia Singles

The Denims - Columbia  Singles

The Denims - Columbia  Singles


Members:
Doug Super, Mike Zaccor, Peter John (2), Ronnie Duff, Steve Curry

The Denims, from the borough of Queens in New York, definitely saved their best until last with the a-side of their final single, the monumental ‘White Ship’. Not to say that the rest of their catalogue isn’t worth checking out. But 60s fiends would dig the surfbeat / garage fusion of ‘I’m Your Man’ or the driving pop-punk of ‘The Ghost In Your House Is Me’. And there is always the raucous frat of ‘The Adler Sock’, recorded for a promotional 45 for a Cincinnati, Ohio sock company that was given away free with each purchase of their clothing.


The Denims - Columbia  Singles

The Denims - Columbia  Singles

The Denims - Columbia  Singles

The Denims - Columbia  Singles

The Blue Beats - Columbia Singles

The Blue Beats  - Columbia  Singles




Despite what the title says, The Blue Beats actually were NOT born in Chicago. The band, in fact, hailed from Ridgefield, Connecticut and were Kit Miller, Peter Robbins, Lance Drake and Jack Lee. The band released two singles, both on the titan of a label, Columbia Records.

Born In Chicago is the Flip-Side of their second single, released in April of 1967, and is the only one of their four recordings that is not an original song. The number was written by San Francisco music guru Nick Gravinites who wrote for a ton of San Francisco performers like Big Brother and the Holding Company, Janis Joplin, Quicksilver Messenger Service and the Chicago band, The Paul Butterfield Blues Band. The latter first recorded Born In Chicago in 1965. This is likely where The Blue Beats picked up on it and, rather ironically, gave it a British Invasion feel. 


The Blue Beats  - Columbia  Singles

The Blue Beats  - Columbia  Singles

The Blue Beats  - Columbia  Singles

The Blue Beats  - Columbia  Singles
The Blue Beats  - Columbia  Singles

The Blue Beats  - Columbia  Singles

The Invictas ‎– The Invictas À Go-Go (Eva Records ) 1983

The Invictas ‎– The Invictas À Go-Go (Eva Records ) 1983

The Invictas ‎– The Invictas À Go-Go (Eva Records ) 1983


Members 1960s:
Herb Gross (aka Herb McGovern) (lead vocals and guitar)
Bruce Hickey (guitar)
Jim Kohler (bass)
Mark Blumenfeld (lead guitar)
Dave Hickey (drums)




The band was formed by Herb Gross  in Rochester, New York in 1960.

The initial lineup consisted of the leader Gross on guitar and vocals, Bruce Hickey on guitar, and Dave Hickey on drums. In 1961, while Gross was attending the Rochester Institute of Technology, he expanded the band to include Jim Kohler on bass and Mark Blumenfeld on lead guita. The band renamed themselves the Invictas. The name was inspired by the Buick car of the time known as the Invicta, meaning "invincible" in Latin. The Invictas, who used a black hearse with their band logo painted on the side to haul equipment and travel from gig to gig, became a regular fixture at Tiny's Bengal Inn, a local club.

The group attracted the attention of Steve Brodie's Sahara label.

A USA Today article says that the band recorded their debut single, "The Hump", in 1963, but this time frame is unlikely, because, according to Markesich's book, it was not released until June 1965, which places the period of recording between late 1964 and mid-1965.  "The Hump" b/w "Long Tall Shorty" was released on Sahara. Just before going into the studio to record the single, the band had to bail their keyboard player out of jail. The song received airplay on the East Coast and was a hit in western New York, reaching a #1 position in Rochester, leading the band to claim that they "outsold the Beatles" locally.

In 1966, a year after the record's original release, "The Hump" became a huge hit, reaching #1 in Buffalo. The band's popularity exploded, and they opened for famous acts such as the Beach Boys, Jay and The Americans, the Shirelles, Gary Lewis and The Playboys, the Young Rascals, and Otis Redding. According to Gross, "Girls were chasing us. We could play pretty much wherever we wanted to play."

The Invictas recorded an album entitled The Invictas a Go-Go, which was produced by Dave Lucas and was hastily recorded during a weekend session in New York City in 1965. It consisted of several tunes written by Gross such as "Do It" and "The Hump," as well as covers of popular songs like "Hang On Sloopy", "Land of a Thousand Dances" and "Satisfaction." The group was not satisfied with the results, feeling that the project had been rushed. The band cut three more singles for Sahara Records and its sister label Bengal.In early 1966 the Invictas released "Do It" b/w "The Hook". They followed this with "I'm Alright" b/w "Stuff" later in the year. In 1967, they released "The Detroit Move", a blue-eyed soul number inspired by Detroit's Mitch Ryder, backed by "Shake a Tail Feather" on the B-side.

Facing the prospect of the Vietnam draft after graduation, Jim Kohler joined the Air Force and Dave Hickey followed suit. The band continued with modified lineups for several more years, but with the constant grind of touring finally taking its toll, the band broke up in the early 1970s.

Herb Gross started an advertising firm and has been active with it for many years. Jim Kohler became involved the printing business.

The Invictas had a brief and temporary reunion in the 1980. In 2004, Herb Gross and Dave Hickey were watching a blues band perform in Rochester and the singer invited them onto the stage. When Gross came up to sing, to his surprise, the crowd pleaded for him to sing "The Hump." Afterwards, he expressed to Hickey that the band should reunite. The band got back together with three of the four original lineup, Gross, Dave Hickey, and Jim Kohler, as well as also Dave Profeta, who is now the band's lead guitarist. Proefta also participated in their 1980 reunion. They have been active, playing various gigs and functions since, and have been profiled in USA Today and on NBC's The Today Show. They still travel in a hearse with their logo painted on the side.

Their collected work from the 1960s is included on the anthology Best of Herb Gross & the Invictas: Á Go Go, which includes their 1965 album Á Go Go along with singles and outtakes.Since re-uniting they have released an album of newly recorded material, Let's Party

The Invictas ‎– The Invictas À Go-Go (Eva Records ) 1983

The Invictas ‎– The Invictas À Go-Go (Eva Records ) 1983

The Invictas ‎– The Invictas À Go-Go (Eva Records ) 1983


The Invictas ‎– The Invictas À Go-Go (Eva Records ) 1983

Originally recorded in New York City in 1965


The Countdown Five ‎– Shaka Shaka Na Na (1969) Plus



Members: Mack Hayes, Tommy Williams, Tommy Murphy, Steve Long, John Balzer


Members of the Galveston Bay, Texas’ rock scene of the middle to late 1960’s, The Countdown 5 were part owners of the renowned Houston recording studio Andrus Productions, where producer Walter Andrus recorded many bands, including the 13th Floor Elevators and Fever Tree. While the group never got the big break to record an LP, they did manage to release several singles on a variety of labels, and while none hit big in the US, years later the group did learn that one of their singles had actually topped the charts in Germany for a short period of time. Finally, nearly fifty years after the band called it quits, their entire recorded legacy has been compiled on a two CD collection by Gear Fab Records, and quite a treat it is.

The band consisted of Mack Hayes who possessed a wide, versatile vocal range and was quite comfortable fronting the band, while the rhythm section of bassist/vocalist Tommy Murphy and drummer Tommy Williams was indeed formidable, always solidly holding down the band’s bottom end sound, Left handed John Balzer was one of the most talented, versatile and innovative guitarists of the day as well as being a fine singer in his own right and Steve Long’s keyboards gave the band their special style of 1960’s Texas rock, while he also contributed saxophone to the group’s sound. The Countdown 5’s recorded repertoire was mostly original material, with Hayes and Balzer being especially prolific writers, mixed with tasty covers of tunes written by the likes of The Isley Brothers and Johnny Otis. 


The Countdown Five ‎– Shaka Shaka Na Na (1969)




The Countdown 5 ‎– Uncle Kirby (From Brazil) 1967





The Variations - Dig Em Up !

The Variations - Dig Em Up !


This recording is from the small North Carolina-based Justice label. 
Reflecting the company's first and only foray into color cover art. 
The line up was credited as bassist Nonnie Bost, sax player Jimmy Brawler, 
drummer Bob Ennis, singer J.B. Gamble, lead guitarist Jimmy Kincade and 
rhythm guitarist David Poteat. In addition to being the senior member (he was 26 
while the rest of the band members were between 18 and 20, though most looked 
14), Ennis was the band front man. 

Nonnie Bost - Bass 
Jimmy Brawler - Tenor Sax, Keyboards 
Bobby Ennis - Drums, Percussion 
J.B. Gamble - Vocals 
Jimmy Kincade - Lead guitar 
David Poteat - Rhythm guitar

The Variations - Dig Em Up !

The Variations - Dig Em Up !

Thank you for this,Tom...


-----------------------------------------------------------------
Maybe someone has this?

Various ‎– Hipno Sound Let's Dig 'Em Up!!!

The Variations - Dig Em Up !

Tracklist
1–John E. Sharp & The Squires Monkey Shine
2–The Deep Six Last Time Around
3–De Maskers My Little Girl
4–Los York's Justo A Mi Gusto
5–Los Young Beats Not Fade Away
6–The Yorkshire Puddin' Good Night Day
7–The Stone Cutters Fellow Slave
8–Yuzo Kayama* & The Launchers* Black Sand Beach
9–Thee Impalas Oh Yeah!
10–Les Serpents Noirs Be In
11–Eric Charden Amour Limite Zero
12–Jack Bedient & The Chessmen Glimmer, Glimmer
13–The Astronauts Tomorrow Is Gonna Be Another Day
14–The Kenetics Put Your Lovin' On Me
15–The Riders Of The Mark* Gotta Find Somebody
16–The Classics Mean Woman
17–Underground Ballon Corps.* Heart (Made Of Soul)
18–The Last Image Leaving You
19–The Hard Times Mr. Rolling Stone
20–The What's New Up So High
21–The Lavender Blues Don't Put Me On
22–Epic Five Don't Need Your Lovin'
23–The Jades You Have To Walk
24–The Skeptics Certain Kind Of Girls
25–The Outcasts I Can't Get Through To You
26–The Cliches Why, Why, Why
27–The Baskerville Hounds I Can Take It
28–Mike Vetro & The Cellar Dwellers Mustang
29–Les Millionairs Encore
30–Polanie Dlugo Sie Znamy

The Variations - Dig Em Up !

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The T-Bones - Everyone's Gone To The Moon (And Other Trips) 1966


The T-Bones - Everyone's Gone To The Moon (And Other Trips) 1966


The T-Bones were a Liberty Records recording group from 1963 - 1966. The studio recordings of all of their albums but the last were done by American session musicians, The Wrecking Crew  
They should not be confused with the British mid-1960s band of the same name The T-Bones . In Britain, the name "U.S. T-Bones" was used for the Liberty Records group. 
When the T-Bones had a hit in 1966 with the single No Matter What Shape (Your Stomach's In), Liberty Records quickly recorded an album of the same name using session musicians from The Wrecking Crew, but those musicians weren't willing to go on tour to promote the album. They were making too much money doing sessions in Los Angeles. So Liberty created a different "public" T-Bones group to appear on record covers, TV, and in concert. The "public" T-Bones were Judd Hamilton, Dan Hamilton, Joe Frank Carollo, Tommy Reynolds, and Gene Pello. None of them played on the hit record, nor did they play on the next album, "Sippin' and Chippin." However the "public" T-Bones did record the T-Bones' final album, "Everyone's Gone To The Moon (And Other Trips)." Dan Hamilton, Carollo, and Reynolds would later form the 1970s soft rock trio Hamilton, Joe Frank and Reynolds. 
"No Matter What Shape (Your Stomach's In)", was based on the melody from a commercial for Alka-Seltzer. The tune reached #3, and its follow-up, "Sippin N Chippin", peaked at #62; the accompanying album hit #75 on the Billboard 200.

Members:
Danny Hamilton, Joe Frank Carollo, Judd Hamilton, Tommy Reynolds

The T-Bones - Everyone's Gone To The Moon (1966)

The T-Bones - Everyone's Gone To The Moon (And Other Trips) 1966

The Duprees - Columbia SinglesThe James Boys - Columbia SinglesThe Young Ones - Columbia  SinglesThe Denims - Columbia  SinglesThe Blue Beats  - Columbia  SinglesThe Invictas ‎– The Invictas À Go-Go (Eva Records ) 1983The Countdown Five ‎– Shaka Shaka Na Na (1969) PlusThe Variations - Dig Em Up !The Varcels - Hang Loose With The VarcelsThe T-Bones - Everyone's Gone To The Moon (And Other Trips) 1966

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