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Baseball Pitcher Earl Andrew Hamilton 1968 Melrose Abbey Cemetery

Baseball Pitcher Earl Andrew Hamilton 1968 Melrose Abbey Cemetery

Earl Andrew Hamilton (July 19, 1891 – November 17, 1968) was a left-handed pitcher for the St. Louis Browns (1911–16, later in 1916–17), Detroit Tigers (1916), Pittsburgh Pirates (1918–23), and the Philadelphia Phillies (1924) of Major League Baseball (MLB). He pitched a no-hitter against Detroit on August 30, 1912, becoming the first player to pitch a no-hitter without recording a strikeout.[1] The Tigers did get a run on a Ty Cobb walk and an error, making the final score 5-1 Browns. Hamilton also batted left-handed and ended his career with an average pitcher's batting average of .153 in 733 at bats.

Baseball Pitcher Earl Andrew Hamilton 1968 Melrose Abbey Cemetery

Career overview

Born in Gibson City, Illinois, Hamilton played his first major league game on April 14, 1911. Through the early to mid-teens, Hamilton was considered a quality pitcher and was one of the better pitchers on some terrible Browns teams. In 1914, Hamilton had a very quality season, going 16-18 with a 2.50 ERA in 302 1/3 innings pitched.

Baseball Pitcher Earl Andrew Hamilton 1968 Melrose Abbey Cemetery

After being purchased by Detroit in 1916, he was waived back to the Browns less than a month later. Then, in 1918, he finally left St. Louis for good after an 0-9 season, being purchased by Pittsburgh before the season began. That season, in 6 starts, he had one of the most amazing seasons ever recorded. Hamilton was 6-0 with a 0.83 ERA in 54 innings that year. He finished with 1 shutout in his 6 complete games. Hamilton had only given up 7 runs (5 earned) in 6 games. 

Baseball Pitcher Earl Andrew Hamilton 1968 Melrose Abbey Cemetery

Oddly, he picked that season to enlist in the Navy. Hamilton returned for more fair seasons with the Pirates. Along with Wilbur Cooper, Whitey Glazner, and Babe Adams, he helped make up a good rotation for Pittsburgh, culminating with a second-place finish in 1921 (behind only the New York Giants, 4 games). However, they never made the World Series with Hamilton.

Baseball Pitcher Earl Andrew Hamilton 1968 Melrose Abbey Cemetery

Before he retired in 1924, Hamilton was selected off waivers by the Phillies, and he went 0-1 with them, with a 10.50 ERA. Hamilton made sparse appearances on leaderboards throughout his career, such as a 9th-place finish in the ERA leaderboard (3.36, 1921) and tying for a 7th-place finish in wins in 1914, when he had 16. He also made the top 10 in losses three times (1914, 15, 21), and ended up finishing only two years of his career with a winning record; his 6-0 season of 1918 and 1922 (11-7).

Baseball Pitcher Earl Andrew Hamilton 1968 Melrose Abbey Cemetery

Hamilton pitched 16 shutout innings on July 16, 1920 with the Pirates, before losing 7-0 against the New York Giants, clearly having run out of gas in the 17th.[1] Rube Benton was the Giants' pitcher, also going 16 shutout innings. In 14 years, he was 115-147 with a solid 3.16 ERA in 410 games (261 starts). He pitched 140 complete games, 16 of them shutouts. Hamilton recorded 790 career strikeouts and allowed 1075 runs (822 earned) in 2342 2/3 innings pitched.

Baseball Pitcher Earl Andrew Hamilton 1968 Melrose Abbey Cemetery

Earl Hamilton died in Anaheim, California, at the age of 77. He is interred at Melrose Abbey Cemetery in Anaheim, California. 

Baseball Pitcher Earl Andrew Hamilton 1968 Melrose Abbey Cemetery

References

1. Jackson, Frank. "No Runs, No Hits, No Strikeouts". hardballtimes.com. 

Baseball Pitcher Earl Andrew Hamilton 1968 Melrose Abbey Cemetery

Sources

Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference

Baseball Pitcher Earl Andrew Hamilton 1968 Melrose Abbey Cemetery


U.S. National & Wimbledon Tennis Champion May Godfrey Sutton 1975 Woodlawn Cemetery

U.S. National & Wimbledon Tennis Champion May Godfrey Sutton 1975 Woodlawn Cemetery

May Godfrey Sutton (September 25, 1886 – October 4, 1975) was an American tennis player who was active during the first decades of the 20th century. At age 17 she won the singles title at the U.S. National Championships and in 1905 she became the first American player to win the singles title at Wimbledon.

U.S. National & Wimbledon Tennis Champion May Godfrey Sutton 1975 Woodlawn Cemetery

Biography

May Sutton was born on September 25, 1886 in Plymouth, England, the youngest of seven children of Adolphus DeGrouchy Sutton, a captain in the Royal Navy and Adeline Esther Godfray.[1][2] When she was six years old, Sutton's family moved to a ranch near Pasadena, California. It was there that she and her sisters played tennis on a court built by her father.[3] As young ladies, May and her sisters, Violet, Florence, and Ethel, dominated the California tennis circuit. In addition to being accomplished tennis players, the girls were excellent basketball players. May, Florence and Violet were all on the Pasadena High School basketball team, which went undefeated in 1900.[4] In 1904 at age 17, May Sutton won the singles title at the U.S. Championships on her first attempt.[2] She also teamed with Miriam Hall to win the women's doubles title and came close to making it a clean sweep by advancing to the mixed doubles final.[5]

U.S. National & Wimbledon Tennis Champion May Godfrey Sutton 1975 Woodlawn Cemetery

She was unable to defend her U.S. title as she traveled to England in May 1905 to compete in the Wimbledon Championships. In June, she won the grass court Northern Championships in Manchester, defeating Hilda Lane in the final.[6] Sutton became the first American and first non-British woman to win the Wimbledon singles title when she beat British star and reigning two-time Wimbledon champion Dorothea Douglass Chambers in the challenge round. She did it while shocking the British audience by rolling up her sleeves to bare her elbows and wearing a skirt that showed her ankles. For the next two years, she and Chambers met in the final, with Chambers recapturing the title in 1906 and Sutton winning it back in 1907.[7]

U.S. National & Wimbledon Tennis Champion May Godfrey Sutton 1975 Woodlawn Cemetery

Sutton was the 1908 Rose Parade Queen in Pasadena.[3]

U.S. National & Wimbledon Tennis Champion May Godfrey Sutton 1975 Woodlawn Cemetery

On December 11, 1912, she married Tom Bundy, who was a three-time winner of the men's doubles title at the U.S. Championships, and semi-retired to raise a family. However, in 1921 at the age of 35, she made a comeback and became the fourth-ranked player in the U.S. In 1925, she was a women's doubles finalist at the U.S. Championships and, although almost forty years of age, her game was strong enough to be selected for America's Wightman Cup team. She was a Wimbledon quarterfinalist in 1929 at the age of 42, which was the first time she had played Wimbledon since 1907. 

U.S. National & Wimbledon Tennis Champion May Godfrey Sutton 1975 Woodlawn Cemetery

In 1928 and 1929, Dorothy Sutton and her daughter Dorothy Cheney became the only mother/daughter combination to be seeded at the U.S. Championships. Her nephew, John Doeg, won the U.S. Championships in 1930, and in 1938, daughter Dorothy won the Australian Championships.

U.S. National & Wimbledon Tennis Champion May Godfrey Sutton 1975 Woodlawn Cemetery

In 1956, Sutton was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame.[8] She never stopped playing tennis and was playing regularly well into her late 80s.

U.S. National & Wimbledon Tennis Champion May Godfrey Sutton 1975 Woodlawn Cemetery

Sutton died of cancer on October 4, 1975 in Santa Monica, California and was interred in the local Woodlawn Memorial Cemetery.[9]

U.S. National & Wimbledon Tennis Champion May Godfrey Sutton 1975 Woodlawn Cemetery

Playing style

Eight-time U.S. National Championship winner Molla Bjurstedt Mallory indicated that Sutton was the best player she had met. "Her drive was the fastest and the...most difficult...to handle, because it dove suddenly to the ground and then jumped up unexpectedly with queer curves. When she could keep her drives near the baseline, they either forced me back farther than I had been accustomed to play or compelled me to make errors. She was also strong overhead when she came to the net and altogether had more power and effectiveness than any other woman tennis player of her time." Sutton played with an extreme Western grip and had a powerful topspin forehand that made the ball dip and bound high.[10]

U.S. National & Wimbledon Tennis Champion May Godfrey Sutton 1975 Woodlawn Cemetery

Grand Slam finals

Singles : 3 titles, 1 runner-up

Outcome Year Championship Surface Opponents Score

Winner 1904 U.S. Championships Grass United States Elisabeth Moore 6–1, 6–2

Winner 1905 Wimbledon Grass United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Dorothea Douglass Lambert Chambers 6–3, 6–4

Runner-up 1906 Wimbledon Grass United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Dorothea Douglass Lambert Chambers 3–6, 7–9

Winner 1907 Wimbledon Grass United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Dorothea Douglass Lambert Chambers 6–1, 6–4

Doubles : 1 title, 1 runner-up

Outcome Year Championship Surface Partner Opponents Score

Winner 1904 U.S. Championships Grass United States Miriam Hall United States Elisabeth Moore

United States Carrie Neely 3–6, 6–3, 6–3

Runner-up 1925 U.S. Championships Grass United States Elizabeth Ryan United States Mary K. Browne

United States Helen Wills 4–6, 3–6

Mixed doubles : 1 runner-up

Outcome Year Championship Surface Partner Opponents Score

Runner-up 1904 U.S. Championships Grass United States F.B. Dallas United States Elisabeth Moore

United States Wylie Grant 2–6, 1–6

U.S. National & Wimbledon Tennis Champion May Godfrey Sutton 1975 Woodlawn Cemetery

References

 Pauly, Thomas H. (2012). Game Faces : Five Early American Champions and the Sports they Changed. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. p. 111. ISBN 978-0803238176.

 Paul Newman (September 29, 2016). "From the archive: May Sutton, America's first female champion." www.wimbledon.com. AELTC.

 Cecilia Rasmussen (March 28, 1999). "May Bundy rewrote the tennis books." The Los Angeles Times.

 Hult, p. 144

 "Miss Sutton Tennis Champion." (PDF) The New York Times. 26 Jun 1904. Retrieved 7 May 2012.

 "Lawn Tennis – Northern Championships". Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser. British Newspaper Archive. 19 June 1905. p. 3.

 Collins, Bud (2010). The Bud Collins History of Tennis (2nd ed.). [New York]: New Chapter Press. p. 427. ISBN 978-0942257700.

 "Hall of Famers - May Sutton Bundy." International Tennis Federation (ITF).

 "May Sutton Bundy - Oldtime Tennis Queen". St. Petersburg Times. October 7, 1975 – via Google News Archive.

 Ohnsorg, Roger W. Robert Lindley Murray: The Reluctant U.S. Tennis Champion; includes "The First Forty Years of American Tennis." Victoria, BC: Trafford On Demand Pub. p. 52. ISBN 978-1-4269-4514-4.

U.S. National & Wimbledon Tennis Champion May Godfrey Sutton 1975 Woodlawn Cemetery

Additional sources

Hult, Joan S.; Trekell, Marianna (1991). A Century of women's basketball : from frailty to final four. Reston, Va: National Association for Girls and Women in Sport. ISBN 9780883144909.

U.S. National & Wimbledon Tennis Champion May Godfrey Sutton 1975 Woodlawn Cemetery



"Johnny Guitar" Actor Scott Brady 1985 Holy Cross Cemetery


Scott Brady (born Gerard Kenneth Tierney; September 13, 1924 – April 16, 1985) was an American film and television actor best known for his roles in western films and as a ubiquitous television presence.



Life and career

Gerard Kenneth Tierney was born in Brooklyn, New York to Lawrence and Maria Tierney; his father was an Irish American policeman who was chief of the New York aqueduct police force. His older and younger brothers were fellow actors Lawrence and Edward Tierney, respectively.



Lawrence and Edward Tierney in "The Hoodlum" (1951)


Lawrence Tierney

(Lawrence Tierney would later appear in "Reservoir Dogs" (1992))


Edward Tierney

Brady was reared in suburban Westchester County, New York. He was nicknamed "Roddy" in his youth. He attended Roosevelt and St. Michael's high schools where he lettered in basketball, football, and track. He aspired to become a football coach or a radio announcer but instead enlisted in the United States Navy before his graduation from high school. During World War II, he served in the United States Navy as a naval aviation mechanic overseas on the USS Norton Sound.

Discharged in 1946, Brady headed to Los Angeles, California. where his older brother Lawrence was already making some progress as an actor. First taking menial jobs as a cab driver and a lumberjack, Brady enrolled at the Bliss-Hayden drama school under his G.I. Bill of Rights. There he studied acting and took vocal training to eliminate his thick Brooklyn accent.

Brady had two brushes with scandal. In 1957, he was arrested for narcotics possession, but charges were dropped and he always maintained that he was framed.[1]

In 1963, he was barred by the New York State Harness Racing Commission from participation in the sport due to his association with known bookmakers.[2]



Acting career


In 1948, Brady made his film debut as a boxer in the programmer In This Corner (1948) and took tough-guy roles in films like He Walked by Night, Undertow, and Canon City. 



He continued to impress as Jeanne Crain's leading man in the romantic comedy The Model and the Marriage Broker and opposite Joan Crawford in the cult western drama Johnny Guitar.



From 1953 to 1956, Brady appeared four times in different roles on the anthology series Lux Video Theatre and appeared five times on the NBC anthology series The Ford Television Theatre. In 1955, he portrayed Ted Slater in "Man in the Ring" of NBC's anthology series The Loretta Young Show. From 1953 to 1956, he appeared five times on the NBC anthology series, The Ford Television Theatre. In 1955 and 1957, Brady was twice cast on another anthology program Studio 57. Early in 1957, he was cast in "The Barbed Wire Preacher" of the religion anthology series Crossroads.

On December 26, 1957, Brady played the frontier figure William Bent in the episode "Lone Woman" of CBS's anthology Playhouse 90, with Raymond Burr cast as his brother, Charles Bent. The plot involved the establishment in Bent's Old Fort on the Arkansas River in southeastern Colorado. Kathryn Grayson played the "Lone Woman," a Cheyenne Indian.



From 1955 to 1959, Brady appeared five times on CBS's anthology series Schlitz Playhouse, including the roles of Reno Cromwell in "Night of the Big Swamp" and Calvin Penny in "Papa Said No." The Schlitz Playhouse episode "The Salted Mine" became the pilot for Brady's own western television series Shotgun Slade, which aired seventy-eight episodes in syndication from 1959 to 1961.

In addition to Shotgun Slade, Brady appeared in several other television westerns, including Dick Powell's Zane Grey Theater, The High Chaparral, Lancer, Dirty Sally, The Virginian (twice), and Gunsmoke (three times).



In 1958, he played the lead role of Sergeant Matt Blake to Clint Eastwood's third billing as Keith Williams in Ambush at Cimarron Pass.




Scott Brady and Andy Griffith in Broadway musical version of Destry Rides Again (1959)

In 1961, he played the roles of John Keller in "We're Holding Your Son" on the anthology series hosted by Ronald Reagan, General Electric Theater, and Ernie Taggart in "Voyage into Fear" of the CBS detective series, Checkmate. 



In 1962, Brady was cast in the lead guest role as reporter/commentator Floyd Gibbons in "The Floyd Gibbons Story" of ABC's The Untouchables, starring Robert Stack. The next year, he portrayed Bill Floyd in the episode "Run for Doom" of CBS's The Alfred Hitchcock Hour. In 1967, Brady guest starred on Carl Betz's ABC legal drama, Judd, for the Defense.

During the mid 1960s, Brady starred in several of A.C. Lyles' Western films. In 1969, he portrayed Budd Blake in the episode "Panic" of the NBC drama Bracken's World. In 1973, he was cast as Davey Collier in "No Stone Unturned" of NBC's Banacek. From 1975 to 1977, Brady had the recurring role of "Vinnie" in sixteen episodes of NBC's Police Story crime drama.

On February 15, 1977, he appeared as Shirley Feeney's father, Jack Feeney, in the episode "Buddy, Can You Spare a Father?" on ABC's Laverne and Shirley. Though he had turned down the role of Archie Bunker on All in the Family, Brady appeared as Joe Foley on four episodes in 1976. 



Bradt appeared five times on the James Garner NBC series, The Rockford Files. In 1977, he portrayed Lou Caruso in "Caruso's Way" of ABC's sitcom Welcome Back, Kotter, and appeared as Matt Zaleski in the TV miniseries Wheels the following year.



In 1983, Brady portrayed Alex Kidd in "Shadow of Sam Penny" on the CBS detective series Simon and Simon. Brady's last film acting role was as Sheriff Frank in the 1984 film Gremlins.


Personal life

Brady had been involved earlier in life with actresses Gwen Verdon, Dorothy Malone, and Suzan Ball, but went on to marry a non-actress at age 43 and have two sons. A staunch supporter of Notre Dame Fighting Irish football, Brady hosted the team with a party at his home in the Hollywood Hills whenever the Irish came to town to play the University of Southern California.



In 1981, Brady was stricken with pulmonary fibrosis and thereafter required the use of an oxygen tank. He died four years later at the age of 60. He is interred at Holy Cross Cemetery in Culver City, California.



Partial filmography

The Counterfeiters (1948) - Jerry McGee




Canon City (1948) - Jim Sherbondy

In This Corner (1948) - Jimmy Weston
He Walked by Night (1948) - Police Sgt. Marty Brennan




The Gal Who Took the West (1949) - Lee O'Hara




Port of New York (1949) - Michael 'Mickey' Waters




Undertow (1949) - Tony Reagan




I Was a Shoplifter (1950) - Jeff Andrews




Undercover Girl (1950) - Lt. Michael Trent




Kansas Raiders (1950) - Bill Anderson

The Model and the Marriage Broker (1951) - Matt Hornbeck
Bronco Buster (1952) - Bart Eaton




Untamed Frontier (1952) - Glenn Denbow




Yankee Buccaneer (1952) - Lt. David Farragut




Montana Belle (1952) - Bob Dalton




Bloodhounds of Broadway (1952) - Robert 'Numbers' Foster

Three Steps to the Gallows (UK) / White Fire (US) (1953) - Gregor Stevens




A Perilous Journey (1953) - Shard Benton


El Alamein (1953) - Joe Banning

Johnny Guitar (1954) - Dancin' Kid




The Law vs. Billy the Kid (1954) - William 'Billy the Kid' Bonney




They Were So Young (1954) - Richard Lanning

Gentlemen Marry Brunettes (1955) - David Action




The Vanishing American (1955) - Blandy


Mohawk (1956) - Jonathan




Terror at Midnight (1956) - Neal 'Rick' Rickards




The Maverick Queen (1956) - Sundance




The Storm Rider (1957) - Bart Jones




The Restless Breed (1957) - Mitch




Ambush at Cimarron Pass (1958) - Sgt. Matt Blake


Blood Arrow (1958) - Dan Kree




Battle Flame (1959) - 1st Lt. Frank Davis

Operation Bikini (1963) - Capt. Emmett Carey




Stage to Thunder Rock (1964) - Sam Swope

John Goldfarb, Please Come Home! (1965) - Coach Sakalakis
Black Spurs (1965) - Reverend Tanner




Destination Inner Space (1966) - Cmdr. Wayne




Castle of Evil (1966) - Matt Granger


Red Tomahawk (1967) - Ep Wyatt

Fort Utah (1967) - Dajin
Journey to the Center of Time (1967) - Stanton




Arizona Bushwhackers (1968) - Tom Rile

The Road Hustlers (1968) - Earl Veasey
They Ran for Their Lives (1968) - Joe Seely
The Mighty Gorga (1969) - Dan Morgan
Nightmare in Wax (1969) - Detective Haskell
Satan's Sadists (1969) - Charlie Baldwin
The Ice House (1969) - Lt. Scott
The Cycle Savages (1969) - Vice Squad Detective (uncredited)




Five Bloody Graves (1969) - Jim Wade

Marooned (1969) - Public Affairs Officer
Hell's Bloody Devils (1970) - Brand
Cain's Cutthroats (1970) - Justice Cain
Doctors' Wives (1971) - Sgt.Malloy




$ (1971) - Sarge AKA The Heist In UK.

The Loners (1972) - Policeman Hearn
Bonnie's Kids (1972) - Ben
The Leo Chronicles (1972)
Wicked, Wicked (1973) - Police Sgt. Ramsey
The Night Strangler (1973) - Police Captain Schubert
Roll, Freddy, Roll! (1974, TV Movie) - Admiral Norton
When Every Day Was the Fourth of July (1978, TV Movie) - Officer Michael Doyle
Women in White (1979, TV Movie) - Bartender




The China Syndrome (1979) - Herman De Young

Strange Behavior (1981) - Shea




Gremlins (1984) - Sheriff Frank (final film role)



References

1. "Actor Scott Brady, Friend Jailed on Narcotics Charges". Los Angeles Times. October 19, 1957.
2. "Actor Brady, 7 Others Get Harness Race Ban". Los Angeles Times. April 2, 1963.


Figure Skater Dona Lee Carrier DIES IN PLANE ACCIDENT 1961 Forest Lawn Glendale Cemetery

Figure Skater Dona Lee Carrier DIES IN PLANE ACCIDENT 1961 Forest Lawn Glendale Cemetery

Dona Lee Carrier (October 23, 1940 – February 15, 1961) was an American figure skater who competed in ice dancing with Roger Campbell.

Figure Skater Dona Lee Carrier DIES IN PLANE ACCIDENT 1961 Forest Lawn Glendale Cemetery

Personal details

Carrier was born in National City, CA to Rev Floyd and Eleanor Carrier; their only child. She started skating at 11 years old after she moved to Seattle with her parents. They then moved to Troy, NY, and thereafter Southern California.[1]

Figure Skater Dona Lee Carrier DIES IN PLANE ACCIDENT 1961 Forest Lawn Glendale Cemetery

Training

In Hollywood (at the Polar Palace), Carrier joined the Los Angeles Figure Skating Club. However, she had difficulty finding a permanent ice dancing partner. In club and regional competitions, she competed in pairs and ice dancing, with partners including Campbell, Howie Harrold and Dr. Robert Wilkins. When U.S. World Team members Campbell and Yvonne Littlefield dissolved their ice dancing partnership, reportedly over a disagreement between their parents, Campbell and Carrier began skating together in September 1960, winning the 1961 Southwest Pacific Regional and 1961 Pacific Coast Sectional ice dancing titles -– Carrier's first competition victories.

Figure Skater Dona Lee Carrier DIES IN PLANE ACCIDENT 1961 Forest Lawn Glendale Cemetery

Medals

Carrier and Campbell won the silver medal at the 1961 United States Figure Skating Championships, earning them the right to compete a month later at the World Championships in Prague. They also finished second at the North American Figure Skating Championships that year. She became known as a Cup of the Gold on the Ice as she won a gold medal.[2]

Figure Skater Dona Lee Carrier DIES IN PLANE ACCIDENT 1961 Forest Lawn Glendale Cemetery

Plane crash

Carrier and Campbell died along with their teammates on February 15, 1961 when Sabena Flight 548 crashed en route to the World Championships. 

Figure Skater Dona Lee Carrier DIES IN PLANE ACCIDENT 1961 Forest Lawn Glendale Cemetery

Figure Skater Dona Lee Carrier DIES IN PLANE ACCIDENT 1961 Forest Lawn Glendale Cemetery

A $10 million USFS Memorial Fund was set up to honor the crash victims to support the training of promising young skaters.[3] She was 20 years old. She is interred at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California.[4]

Figure Skater Dona Lee Carrier DIES IN PLANE ACCIDENT 1961 Forest Lawn Glendale Cemetery

Figure Skater Dona Lee Carrier DIES IN PLANE ACCIDENT 1961 Forest Lawn Glendale Cemetery

Figure Skater Dona Lee Carrier DIES IN PLANE ACCIDENT 1961 Forest Lawn Glendale Cemetery

Figure Skater Dona Lee Carrier DIES IN PLANE ACCIDENT 1961 Forest Lawn Glendale Cemetery


Results

(with Roger Campbell)

Event 1961

North American Championships 2nd
U.S. Championships 2nd

References

1. "U.S. Figure Skating Team". Cemetery Guide. Retrieved 19 July 2017.
2. "Tag Archives: dona lee carrier". Deadwrite. Retrieved 19 July 2017.
3. "Tag Archives: dona lee carrier". Deadwrite. Retrieved 19 July 2017.
4. Resting Places

Figure Skater Dona Lee Carrier DIES IN PLANE ACCIDENT 1961 Forest Lawn Glendale Cemetery

"The Shootist" Producer, Football Player, & Actor Mike Frankovich 1992 Forest Lawn Glendale Cemetery


Mitchell John "M. J." Frankovich (September 29, 1909 – January 1, 1992), best known as Mike Frankovich, was an American football player turned film actor and producer. Frankovich was the adopted son of actor Joe E. Brown and his wife, Kathryn.[2][3]


Personal life

Frankovich attended Belmont High School in Downtown Los Angeles. He played football for UCLA and was inducted into UCLA Athletic Hall of Fame in 1986. He served as president of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Commission and helped to bring the Los Angeles Raiders football team and 1984 Summer Olympics to Los Angeles.



Family

A devout Catholic, Frankovich married his first wife, Georgiana (or Georgianna) Feagans, on January 15, 1938. No details are available regarding that marriage or how or when it ended.[4]

He married actress Binnie Barnes in 1940. They remained married until his death on New Year's Day 1992 from pneumonia and Alzheimer's disease in Los Angeles. They adopted three children, including producer, Peter, and production manager, Mike, Jr.[5]



Mike Frankovich and Binnie Barnes are buried at Forest Lawn Glendale Cemetery




Producer

Among his more than 30 productions of film and for television were: Bob and Carol and Ted and Alice (1969), Cactus Flower (1969), There's a Girl in My Soup (1970), Butterflies Are Free (1972), The 42nd Annual Academy Awards (1970), and John Wayne's last film, The Shootist (1976).[5]



Select Filmography




Jesse James Rides Again (1947)


The Black Widow (1947) (serial)
G-Men Never Forget (1948) (serial)
Dangers of the Canadian Mounted (1948) (serial)




Fugitive Lady (1950)




Decameron Nights (1953)

Malaga (1954)
Footsteps in the Fog (1955)
Joe MacBeth (1955)
Spin a Dark Web (1956) aka Soho Incident




The War Lover (1962)




Bob and Carol and Ted and Alice (1969)




Marooned (1969)




Cactus Flower (1969)

The Looking Glass War (1970)
The 42nd Annual Academy Awards (1970) (TV special)
There's a Girl in My Soup (1970)
Doctors' Wives (1971)
The Love Machine (1971)
$ (1971)




Stand Up and Be Counted (1972)




Butterflies Are Free (1972)

40 Carats (1973)
Bob and Carol and Ted and Alice (1973) (TV series)
Report to the Commissioner (1975)
From Noon Till Three (1976)
State Fair (1976)




The Shootist (1976)

Ziegfield: The Man and His Women (1978)
All Star Party for Lucille Ball (1984)
All-Star Party for Clint Eastwood (1986) (TV Special)



References

1. Mike Frankovich at Find a Grave
2. "Life, Times, Family". Orson Pratt Brown. 
3. "Joe E. Brown profile". Cemeteryguide.com. 
4. "Full text of 'The Film Daily (Jan-Mar 1938)'". Archive.org.
5. M. J. Frankovich on IMDb


Bodybuilder, Stuntman, & Actor Bert M. Goodrich 1991 Valley Oaks Cemetery

Bodybuilder, Stuntman, & Actor Bert M. Goodrich 1991 Valley Oaks Cemetery

Bert M. Goodrich (born December 26, 1906 in Tempe, Arizona - December 6, 1991 in Sepulveda, North Hills, Los Angeles, California ) was an American bodybuilder who acted as a stuntman and actor. He was also the owner of the first chain of fitness studios in the United States for several years.

Bodybuilder, Stuntman, & Actor Bert M. Goodrich 1991 Valley Oaks Cemetery

Life and Career

Goodrich was born in Tempe, Arizona. He grew up near a river where during his childhood he refined his swimming skills. In his 12th year he was successful as an acrobat; two years later, he won the state championship title of flyweight and diving in Arizona.

That same year, he made the first step into his future life as a bodybuilder and strongman, as the then just 95-pound and slender Bert Goodrich went to Charles Atlas Training and returned after four years weighing 185 pounds.

At this time, however, he did not put much emphasis on bodybuilding, this served him at this time as a means to an end. With his strength training, he wanted to concentrate more on his talents in other sports such as gymnastics, especially tumbling, or American football.

He developed during his later career at Arizona State University to become an excellent sprinter in the 100 -meter run.

He also appeared in other disciplines such as shot put, javelin, and long jump.

Bodybuilder, Stuntman, & Actor Bert M. Goodrich 1991 Valley Oaks Cemetery

At a young age, he boxed as a flyweight boxer, then as he advanced in age, he became a heavyweight boxer. He denied having professional fights at Madison Square Garden in New York City.

In addition, Goodrich was successful as a trapeze artist (100 feet above the ground and without protection by a safety net) and Adagio-Akrobat. He worked together with a partner as a vaudeville artist.

Even before his 20th Birthday, Goodrich went to Hollywood, where he settled down for a short time and had his first appearances in film productions. Due to his athletic background, he worked as a stuntman.

Bodybuilder, Stuntman, & Actor Bert M. Goodrich 1991 Valley Oaks Cemetery

He appeared in Jay Marchant's The Great Circus Mystery in 1925. In the almost 15-minute adventure serial, he acted alongside strongman Joe Bonomo and female lead actress Louise Lorraine. 

In the early 1930s, he returned to Hollywood again, where he worked in such films as The Galloping Ghost (1931), The Hurricane Express (1932), and Tarzan the Fearless (1933) as a stunt double. 

Bodybuilder, Stuntman, & Actor Bert M. Goodrich 1991 Valley Oaks Cemetery

During the shooting breaks, he often entertained at the local vaudeville circuit or was at the Crystal Pier in Santa Monica, the site of the famous Muscle Beach. He also met the vaudevillian Charlie Schaeffer, with whom he created an act, with which they performed throughout the country and brought it to New York, where finally the actual bodybuilding career of Bert Goodrich began. Together with Schaeffer, he entered the top Music Halls from New York, later switching partners and appearing with his new partner, Figure Skating Champion and Balancer Jack Nelson.

Bodybuilder, Stuntman, & Actor Bert M. Goodrich 1991 Valley Oaks Cemetery

During that time, in February 1939, Goodrich also visited his first "Mr. New York "contest, but only as a spectator. However, due to his stature, he was noticed by a photographer in the crowd and convinced himself to participate in the competition. From Sig Klein, the promoter of the competition, he was lent some shorts for posing, so-called trunks, and Goodrich was brought on stage in the "Tall Class Competition." He was finally able to win the overall competition with his 5'11'' height and 195 pound weight. From then on, he was allowed to call himself "Mr. New York." With this title, he was thus automatically qualified for the AAU Mr. America Competition.

There were no fixed regulations at this first competition on July 4, 1939. (These were only introduced during or after the competition.) For example, in the competition of the year 1939 the jury judged the symmetrical proportions, the posture, the general appearance, as well as the stage presence. Goodrich, with the support of his partner Jack Nelson who himself did not participate in the competition, performed a tumbling act. 

Bodybuilder, Stuntman, & Actor Bert M. Goodrich 1991 Valley Oaks Cemetery

Having the title of "Mr. America" increased Goodrich's fame. He appeared on the cover of numerous well-known magazines. He was together with Charles Atlas and Johnny Weissmüller in Esquire.

Bodybuilder, Stuntman, & Actor Bert M. Goodrich 1991 Valley Oaks Cemetery

By winning the "Mr. America's competition, he finally made the leap into show business and enjoyed from then on a celebrity status. The newfound fame also helped Goodrich, along with Vic Tanny, in 1947 to create the "Mr. and Miss USA"competition and to establish it. The event, which was held in front of some 6,000 spectators in the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles, was also the first of its kind, since the prize money for the winner was $ 1,000 and prize money had never before been paid in a bodybuilding competition. 

Bodybuilder, Stuntman, & Actor Bert M. Goodrich 1991 Valley Oaks Cemetery

Bert Goodrich organized the so-called "Mr. Hercules" competitions in which Hollywood star Mae West appeared as the juror. The winners of this show were signed by West in their night clubs.

During the Second World War, Bert Goodrich was a Physical Training Instructor (PTI) in the US Navy and was stationed in North Iceland where he was head of the local Navy gym. He became the "Director of Physical training" of the North American Aviation Company in Canoga Park. 

Bodybuilder, Stuntman, & Actor Bert M. Goodrich 1991 Valley Oaks Cemetery

During this time he also met his partner George Redpath, with whom he developed an act as a hand-balance duo, with Goodrich being the lower part of a "two-man hand balance act." 

Bodybuilder, Stuntman, & Actor Bert M. Goodrich 1991 Valley Oaks Cemetery

After leaving the Navy after he had refused knee surgery, he moved back to Los Angeles, where he opened his gym on Hollywood Boulevard in 1946. He called it "the most sumptuous, beautiful gym in the country." It was the first so-called glamour gym that could boast faux leather walls and additional chrome trim. There he trained stars like Fess Parker, Steve Reeves, Bob Mathias, and James Arness. 

He worked as an actor in various film productions, but only in insignificant roles, which were tailored specifically to him. He was in Berlin-Express (1948) as a member of an acrobatic team.  He was also seen in the films Roseanna McCoy (1949) and Alias ​​the Champ (1949). 

Bodybuilder, Stuntman, & Actor Bert M. Goodrich 1991 Valley Oaks Cemetery

In 1954 he played a bodybuilder in the romantic musical comedy Athena

He added six more gyms and his business became the first chain of gyms in the United States. However, all of the seven facilities in California were sold by Goodrich in 1956 and his career shifted to other activities. He worked in public relations, was active as a stockbroker, and became a business developer. 

In the 1960s, he appeared as a guest on numerous US television shows (including To Tell the Truth ) and was also often seen on local television. 

In 1976, at the age of 69, he also took part in the Senior Olympics and was praised by the journalists for having a consistently good pulse and blood pressure despite his age. He completed 75 push-ups every morning until shortly before his death.

In his old age, he learned to play the ukulele and harmonica. He often played in retirement homes and other such facilities. In June 1991, the health of Bert Goodrich worsened. He had to have a large part of his colon removed as this had formed a gangrene.


Bodybuilder, Stuntman, & Actor Bert M. Goodrich 1991 Valley Oaks Cemetery

On December 6, 1991, Goodrich died at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in the San Fernando district of Sepulveda. He left behind his wife Norma (the sister of his longtime partner Vic Tanny) to who was married for almost 50 years, his son Bert Jr., his daughter Lucinda, and two grandchildren. The funeral took place on December 11, 1991 at Valley Oaks Memorial Park in Westlake Village. His wife Norma survived him for ten years, died in 2001 and was buried at his side.


Bodybuilder, Stuntman, & Actor Bert M. Goodrich 1991 Valley Oaks Cemetery

Bodybuilder, Stuntman, & Actor Bert M. Goodrich 1991 Valley Oaks Cemetery

A few years before his death, he was honored with numerous awards. These included the honoring of the venerable "Association of Old-time Barbell and Strongmen" on May 23, 1987 for his participation in the Mr. America competition of 1939 (which at the time still bore the name America's Best Physique Contest). He also received the "Pioneer of Physical Fitness Award" in 1985 and the "Hollywood Stuntman's Award" one year later.


Bodybuilder, Stuntman, & Actor Bert M. Goodrich 1991 Valley Oaks Cemetery

Sportsman Boyd Ellis 1974 Fairhaven Cemetery

Sportsman Boyd Ellis 1974 Fairhaven Cemetery

Sportsman Boyd Ellis (December 26, 1884 - July 11, 1974) was a pioneer race car driver and boxing promoter.


Sportsman Boyd Ellis 1974 Fairhaven Cemetery
"Sports pioneer. He was a pioneer race car driver and boxing promoter. Boyd and his brother Henley were teammates in several Los Angeles to Phoenix road races in the early twentieth century. These early races were precursors to today's Baja 500 and were filled with thrills and daring. In the early days of automobile racing the drivers also built their own cars, and the Buick that the Ellis' assembled, it attained high speed records for the period. The Ellis racing brothers were contemporaries of early race car legends such as Barney Oldfield, Teddy Tetzlaf, Joe Nikrant, and Earl Cooper. He was also a boxer of note in his early days and was a conditioning partner of Oscar "Battling" Nelson, (the two time lightweight boxing champion 1905-1906 and 1908-1910). Prior to Nelson's title fight (July 13, 1909) versus Adolph Wolgast (lightweight boxing champion 1910-1912) at Los Angeles, he conditioned and sparred with Ellis at a training facility in Orange County. The Nelson/ Wolgast fight ended in a ten round no decision contest with Nelson retaining the championship. During the 1920's and 1930's, this boxing background influenced Ellis to promote four round boxing matches in Orange County at the Delhi Athletic Club, in Santa Ana. During his boxing career, Ellis purchased one hundred and ten acres of ranch land in what is now Fountain Valley, farming lima beans and raising dairy cows. The Ellis ranch was one of the first operating dairies in Orange County. In addition, present day Ellis Avenue in Fountain Valley is named in his honor. He was inducted into the Orange County Sports Hall of Fame in the early 1970's."

- Michael Barry at Find A Grave
Sportsman Boyd Ellis 1974 Fairhaven Cemetery

Boyd Ellis died at the age of 89 on July 11, 1974 in Santa Ana, California and is interred at Fairhaven Memorial Park.


Sportsman Boyd Ellis 1974 Fairhaven Cemetery

Sportsman Boyd Ellis 1974 Fairhaven Cemetery

Sportsman Boyd Ellis 1974 Fairhaven Cemetery

Sportsman Boyd Ellis 1974 Fairhaven Cemetery


Sportsman Boyd Ellis 1974 Fairhaven Cemetery

"Dodgers" Baseball Pitcher Bobby Castillo Jr. 2014 Rose Hills Cemetery


Bobby Castillo aka Robert Ernie "Babo"[1] Castillo Jr. (April 18, 1955 – June 30, 2014) was an American professional baseball pitcher. 





He played for the Los Angeles Dodgers and Minnesota Twins of Major League Baseball (MLB) between 1977 and 1985. 



He was in the bullpen for the Dodgers in the 1981 World Series, pitching one inning against the New York Yankees. 


He also pitched one season in Japan for the Chunichi Dragons in 1987. 


Castillo is credited with teaching his former Dodgers team-mate, Fernando Valenzuela, how to throw a screwball.[2][3]



Castillo died on June 30, 2014 from cancer at the age of 59.[1] His name is listed on the Gardens Memorial Wall at Rose Hills Memorial Park in Whittier, California. 





References

1. "Dodgers' 'Babo' Castillo dies at 59". ESPN.com. Associated Press. June 30, 2014.
2. "Shrine of the Eternals 2006 Induction Day Photos". Baseballreliquary.org. 2006-07-23.
3. "Mexican American Baseball". Baseballreliquary.org. 2005-04-09.


Gold Medal Olympic Basketball Champion John Haskell "Tex" Gibbons 1984 Rose Hills Cemetery

Gold Medal Olympic Basketball Champion John Haskell

John Haskell "Tex" Gibbons (October 7, 1907 – May 30, 1984) was an American basketball player who competed in the 1936 Summer Olympics and won a Gold Medal. 

Gold Medal Olympic Basketball Champion John Haskell

In the early 30s, John Gibbons played his basketball at Southwestern College of Winfield, Kansas, but after graduation, like many of the stars of his day, he joined the Amateur Athletic Union league. He played for several AAU teams. As a member of the McPherson Oilers, he qualified for the 1936 Olympic team. He became the captain of the 1936 Olympics American basketball team, which won the Gold Medal.

Gold Medal Olympic Basketball Champion John Haskell

Gold Medal Olympic Basketball Champion John Haskell

After his sports career, Gibbons taught and coached at UCLA. Later, he joined the employ of Phillips Oil and spent a long career in the oil business.

Gold Medal Olympic Basketball Champion John Haskell

John Haskell "Tex" Gibbons died in La Habra, California. He is buried at Rose Hills Memorial Park in Whittier, California. 

Gold Medal Olympic Basketball Champion John Haskell

Gold Medal Olympic Basketball Champion John Haskell

Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

David George MacDonald (July 23, 1936 – May 30, 1964) was an American road racing champion noted for his successes driving Corvettes and Shelby Cobras in the early 1960s. At the age of 27 he was killed in the 1964 Indianapolis 500. In his four-year racing career, MacDonald competed in 118 races with 52 victories and 75 top-three finishes.[1]

Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

MacDonald was inducted into the National Corvette Museum's Corvette Hall of Fame in 2014,[2] and into the United States Road Racing Championship (USRRC) Hall of Fame in 2016.[3]


Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

Sports car and NASCAR racing career

MacDonald began racing in 1956, running a ’55 Chevrolet Corvette on Southern Californian drag strips. He won nearly 100 trophies between 1956 and 1959, all in Corvettes.

At the 1958 NHRA Western US Drag Racing Championships at Chandler Air Force Base in Arizona, MacDonald set two standing start speed records in a stock '58 Corvette - 104.68 mph in the ¼ mile and 123.11 mph in the 1/2 mile. Between 1958-1962 he drove Corvettes to six more speed records in the 1/4, 1/2 and one-mile distances at annual US speed trials.

MacDonald moved to the road racing circuit in 1960, and his first race was at Willow Springs Raceway on February 13–14. He ran a ’57 Corvette to a fourth place finish, behind winner Bob Bondurant in Saturday’s preliminary race, and then won Sunday’s feature race to record his first ever victory. At the end of the 1962 season, he had driven Corvettes to 28 victories in 64 races, including 42 top-three finishes. MacDonald’s unique style of drifting through turns at full speed made him a crowd favorite and earned him the nickname "Master of Oversteer."[4]


Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

Dave MacDonald in Riverside Raceway win driving his custom No. 00 Corvette Special - March 1962

In June 1962, Zora Arkus-Duntov selected Dave MacDonald and Dick Thompson to do the shakedown testing during development of Chevrolet's all new 1963 Corvette Sting Ray. Four days of all-out road testing were performed on a coupe and a convertible at the General Motors Proving Grounds in Milford, Michigan. General Motors used footage from these tests to create a promotional film entitled "Biography of a Sports Car."[5] The film was distributed around the globe as part of GM's marketing campaign promoting the new sports car. In September Duntov and other Chevrolet executives presented MacDonald with the first ever 1963 Z06 Sting Ray that he race debuted at Riverside Raceway on October 13, 1962. The highly anticipated race also marked the debut of Carroll Shelby’s new Ford Cobra Roadster. MacDonald and Cobra driver Billy Krause exchanged the lead during the first hour before both cars dropped out with mechanical troubles.

At the start of the 1963 season, Carroll Shelby hired MacDonald away from Chevrolet to drive his Cobra Roadster. His first outing for Shelby American was February 2–3 at Riverside International Raceway and he drove Cobra CSX2026 to back-to-back victories. These were the Cobra’s first wins. Teammate Ken Miles finished second both days in Cobra CSX2002.[6]

On February 17, 1963, MacDonald finished fourth in Cobra CSX2026 at the FIA Daytona Continental to give the Cobra its first top-five finish in international competition. Shelby retired the 260ci engines after this race and debuted the new Ford 289ci engine at the SCCA sanctioned races at Dodger Stadium on March 3–4, 1963. MacDonald again won both days in Cobra CSX2026 for the 289's first wins.[7]


Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

Dave MacDonald takes wife Sherry on victory lap in Shelby Cobra CSX2128. Pomona July 1963.

In the fall of 1963, MacDonald rose to national prominence after driving Shelby King Cobra CM/1/63 to back-to-back grand prix wins in the two biggest and richest road races in the world - the Los Angeles Times Grand Prix and the Monterey Pacific Grand Prix. These were the first wins for the Shelby King Cobra.[8] In his next three races he finished second at the Hawaiian Grand Prix in Cobra Roadster CSX2136, second at NASCAR’s Golden State 400 in the Wood Brothers No. 21 Ford and second in NASCAR’s Augusta 510 behind Holman/Moody teammate and race winner Fireball Roberts.[9] For his efforts, MacDonald was awarded the Helms Athletic Foundation’s "Athlete of the Month" medallion for October 1963. The award was first issued in 1936 and given to the athlete who most dominated his or her sport through outstanding performance. MacDonald was only the ninth auto racer to receive this honor and the first during the US football season.[10]

Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

MacDonald wins the 1963 LA Times Grand Prix in Shelby King Cobra CM/1/63 (Allen Kuhn photo)

1964 would be MacDonald’s final year in racing. He remained committed to a full Cobra schedule with Shelby American but also signed to run 20 races on the NASCAR circuit for Ford Mercury factory member, Bill Stroppe. MacDonald also signed a two-year contract with Mickey Thompson to run the 1964 and ’65 Indianapolis 500's.

On February 23, 1964, Dave MacDonald competed in his first and only Daytona 500, he finished 10th against a field NASCAR.com considers the greatest in NASCAR history[11][12] Richard Petty won the '64 race, capturing his first of seven Daytona 500s.

March 1, 1964, MacDonald won the United States Road Racing Championships at Augusta International Raceway in Shelby King Cobra CM/1/63. His average speed of 97.653 MPH was 11 MPH faster than the previous track record set by Fireball Roberts in the Augusta 510.[13] After this victory, hall of fame motor sports journalist, Chris Economaki, wrote that, "Dave MacDonald just stamped himself as one of today's road racing greats".[14]

On March 21, 1964, MacDonald and co-driver Bob Holbert ran Shelby Cobra Daytona Coupe CSX2287 to the GT Class win (fourth overall) in the 12 Hours of Sebring international endurance race. This was the first win for the Shelby Cobra Daytona Coupes while also breaking Ferrari's 6-year win streak in the Grand Touring Division.[15]

On April 19, 1964, MacDonald won the Phoenix FIA National Open at Phoenix International Raceway in Shelby King Cobra-Lang Cooper CM/1/64. This was the debut outing for CM/1/64 and its first win.[16]

On May 3, 1964, MacDonald finished 2nd in the United States Road Racing Championships at Laguna Seca Raceway in Shelby King Cobra CM/1/64. He finished between the Chaparrals of race winner Jim Hall and 3rd-place finisher Roger Penske.

On May 10, 1964, MacDonald won the United States Road Racing Championships at Kent, Washington in King Cobra CM/3/63. The victory put him in a tie atop the USRRC Drivers' Championship standings with Jim Hall, who he invited to share the victory lap.[17] This would be MacDonald's last race before his death three weeks later in the Indy 500.


Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

Thompson No. 83 Race Car

Indy 500

Mickey Thompson hired MacDonald to drive one of his radical low profile rear-engine race cars in the 1964 Indy 500. Thompson's Ford-powered racers were specifically designed to run on 12" tires and, after debuting in the 1963 Indy 500, the cars became known as "roller skates." They were far ahead of their time, but badly designed and difficult to drive.[18] Graham Hill tested the car before the '63 Indy race and refused to drive it because of its poor handling, a condition made worse for 1964 when Thompson was forced to completely redesign the cars to accommodate the new USAC-mandated 15-inch (380 mm) minimum tire height.

One of the changes Thompson made to improve stability was to fit his cars with full-fendered aerodynamic body kits, unheard of at Indy's open-wheeled speedway. Thompson hired MacDonald, a rookie at Indy, and veteran racer Masten Gregory to drive two of his three cars in 1964, but several of the top drivers declined offers to drive the revolutionary but undeveloped cars. Graham Hill tested Thompson's new ‘64 design and, like the previous year decided against driving it in the race. Thompson selected Duane Carter to join Gregory and MacDonald, and in the first week of May, all three cars crashed or spun in practice. Gregory abruptly quit the team, citing the poor handling of his car, and Thompson found it difficult to find a replacement, as other available drivers took the advice of Gregory and stayed away. Fifteen-time Indy 500 competitor Eddie Johnson did accept Thompson’s offer and joined the team in mid-May. It was reported that while out practicing with MacDonald on Carb Day, 1963 World Champion Jim Clark noticed strange movements from MacDonald's car, followed him into the pits and urged him to "Get out of that car, mate - just walk away." [19] According to journalist Chris Economaki, MacDonald never practiced with a full load of fuel due to Thompson's focus on high speeds. Despite handling woes, MacDonald qualified the Thompson No. 83 car at an average speed of 151.464 mph, placing him in the middle of row five and in 14th position. Johnson qualified Gregory's reconstructed No. 84 car, and placed it on the outside of row eight and in 24th position. On Bump Day, the final day of qualifying, Thompson hired Chuck Arnold (15th in the 1959 Indy 500) to put the 82 in the field and drive it in the race. While preparing for his qualifying attempt Arnold spun twice in separate practice runs and walked away from the ride. With just a few hours left in qualifying Thompson sought out Gregory and asked if he'd come back to the team and run the No. 82 car. Gregory, still without a ride for the 500, agreed to try and qualify the 82 but not run it in the race. Gregory's late day attempt fell short on speed and neither he nor the No. 82 ran the 500.[20]

Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

Death

MacDonald started in the 14th position in the 1964 Indy 500, and after dropping two positions on the first lap, he began passing cars and moving toward the leaders.[21] As he passed Johnny Rutherford and Eddie Sachs, Rutherford noticed that MacDonald's car was very loose. Rutherford later said that, watching the behavior of MacDonald's car, he thought, "Whoa, he's either going to win this thing or crash."[22] MacDonald was in the 10th position as he came out of turn four and on to the front straight to complete lap two. MacDonald moved left to pass Walt Hansgen and a split second later Hangsen moved left to pass Jim Hurtubise. MacDonald moved left again to avoid Hansgen and the front end of his car lifted and he lost control. His car slid across the track and hit the inside retaining wall, igniting the 45 gallon fuel load and causing a massive fire. His car then slid back up the track toward the outside wall and six more cars became involved. Eddie Sachs, blinded by flames and smoke, broadsided MacDonald's car, resulting in another fireball. 

Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

For the first time in its history, the Indianapolis 500 was stopped because of an accident. According to reports, Sachs died instantly due to blunt-force injuries, while MacDonald was transported to Methodist Hospital of Indianapolis and died two hours later. Eddie Johnson retired the other Thompson car after only six laps. The fiery crash led to safety changes at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, including a USAC requirement that cars carry less fuel, a change that led every team to switch from gasoline to methanol prior to the next year's Indy 500.[23][24][25]


Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

Carroll Shelby, Mickey Thompson, Bill Stroppe and Don Steves were among the pallbearers serving at MacDonald's funeral.

Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

David MacDonald is buried at Rose Hills Memorial Park in Whittier, California.

Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

Notes

MacDonald drove each of the legendary Shelby Cobras — Cobra Roadster, King Cobra and Cobra Daytona Coupe — to their first victories 

Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

In 1964, MacDonald was set to make his motion picture debut in the Universal Pictures film, The Lively Set.[26] The movie starred James Darren, Pamela Tiffin and Doug McClure, and was billed as a racing adventure. MacDonald played himself in the movie while also performing driving duties for Darren’s character, “Casey Owens.” Universal was in the final stages of editing when MacDonald was killed in the Indianapolis 500. Citing sensitivity concerns, the studio delayed the release by two months and removed MacDonald’s character from final editing, leaving a cameo appearance.[27] Mickey Thompson, Duane Carter (MacDonald’s Indy teammates) and Billy Krause also had cameos. 

Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

In 2005, the Augusta International Raceway Preservation Society (AIRPS), in conjunction with city officials and homebuilders, named the main road looping through the new Diamond Lakes housing development as Dave MacDonald Drive. A portion of the community is built on old speedway land. Augusta International Raceway was constructed in 1963, but only three races were ever run there - two USRRC events and one NASCAR race. MacDonald competed in all three; finishing first in King Cobra CM/1/63 and second in a Cobra roadster in the USRRC races, and second in NASCAR's Augusta 510.[28] 

In 2008, Carroll Shelby told Hot Rod magazine that, "Dave MacDonald had more raw talent probably than any race driver I ever saw."[29] 

At the 2010 "Legends of Riverside" event honoring Carroll Shelby, the Riverside International Automotive Museum posthumously honored MacDonald for his accomplishments at California's famed race track. Richie Ginther, Phil Hill and Chuck Daigh were also honored at the event. 

In 2013, The Henry Ford created a Dave MacDonald photo set that is now archived in their image collection[30] 

In 2014, Dave MacDonald was inducted into the Corvette Hall of Fame[31] 

In 2016, Dave MacDonald was inducted into the United States Road Racing Championship Hall of Fame.[32] 

In 2016 Dave MacDonald’s wife Sherry and son Rich, arranged to meet Eddie Sachs Jr's son Eddie and Swede Savage's daughter Angela at Indianapolis Motor Speedway during the 2016 Indianapolis 500. They memorialized this race day gathering with photos standing on the precise section of track where all three drivers lost their lives - Dave and Eddie Jr. in 1964 and Swede in 1973. 

In 2017 Shelby American and Superformance released a Sebring Tribute Cobra finished in Dave MacDonald “Cotati livery.” The car is modeled after perhaps the most famous of all Shelby Cobras, CSX2128 - and liveried as it was when MacDonald ran it to its first victory at Cotati Raceway in May 1963.

The MacDonald family actively participate in tributes to Dave, Carroll Shelby, and in other motorsport-related activity. 

Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

Sports car, NASCAR and Indy 500 results

Year Races Wins Top 3 finish

1960 17 5 12 
1961 24 15 18 
1962 28 11 16 
1963 35 17 23 
1964 12 4 6 
Totals 118 52 75

Gallery


Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

Dave MacDonald and Ken Miles in Shelby Cobras finish one-two at Dodger Stadium in March 1963


Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

Dave MacDonald in Shelby King Cobra Lang Cooper CM/1/64 at Riverside Int'l Raceway in 1964


Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

Widow Sherry MacDonald (holding street sign with her husband's name), along with both son Rich and daughter Vicki (behind her), at Dave MacDonald Drive street dedication at housing community developed on the old Augusta International Raceway site in Georgia. Other racers pictured are Frank Warren (holding his own sign), Pamela Trivette (holding her father's sign), and T J Kelly. 2006


Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

Rich MacDonald, Sherry MacDonald and Eddie Sachs III meet up for a 2016 Indianapolis 500 race day photo near the site of the 1964 crash.


Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

Dave MacDonald's son Rich behind the wheel of 2017 Sebring Tribute Cobra released by Shelby American and Superformance. Finished in Dave MacDonald “Cotati livery” the car is modeled after perhaps the most famous of all Shelby Cobras, CSX2128. MacDonald ran CSX2128 to its first victory at Cotati Raceway in May 1963. Also pictured is Shelby American photog Dave Friedman (in car) and Lance and Deborah Stander.

Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

References

1."Driver results — Dave MacDonald". 
2. National Corvette Museum Corvette Hall of Fame. 
3. USRRC HOF. 
4. Shelby Cobra - The Shelby American Original Archives 1962 - 1965 pg 76. 
5. GM Biography of a Sports Car. 
6. Cobra's first win - Dave MacDonald at Riverside 1963. 
7. Shelby American Collection - Racing Archives. Archived from the original on 2008-07-06. 
8. Shelby Cobra - The Shelby American Original Archives 1962 - 1965 pg 70. 
9. October 1963 Race Results - Dave MacDonald. 
10. The Helms Athletic Foundation "Athlete of the Month" award. 
11. "NASCAR.com - "Greatest Field in NASCAR History"". 
12. ""Auto Racing Review - Greatest Field in NASCAR History"". 
13. "1964 USRRC at Augusta International Raceway". 
14. "Davemacdonald.net - 1964 USRRC at Augusta International Raceway - Chris Economaki on MacDonald". 
15. "The CarSource.com - Shelby Daytona Cobra Coupes". 
16. "Phoenix International Raceway Historical Timeline". 
17. "United States Drivers Championship Standings May 1964". 
18. "American Driver, Lone Star JR Johnny Rutherford — Columns — Automobile Magazine". 
19. ""Team Lotus: The Indianapolis Years" by author Andrew Ferguson - 1996". 
20. ""Black Noon" by author Art Garner - 2014". 
21. ""Black Noon" by author Art Garner - 2014". 
22. "Motorsport Memorial". 
23. Los Angeles Times newspaper. 
24. Deaths of Fireball Roberts and Dave MacDonald lead to safety changes. 
25. ""Black Noon" by author Art Garner - 2014". 
26. "The Lively Set by Universal Pictures - 1964". 
27. "1964 Chrysler Turbine - George Stecher". 
28. "Augusta International Raceway Preservation Society Driver Memorial". 
29. "Hot Rod Magazine". 
30. The Henry Ford Collections - Dave MacDonald. 
31. National Corvette Museum Corvette Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on 2014-01-07. 
32. USRRC HOF.

Road Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

Baseball Pitcher Earl Andrew Hamilton 1968 Melrose Abbey CemeteryU.S. National & Wimbledon Tennis Champion May Godfrey Sutton 1975 Woodlawn Cemetery"Johnny Guitar" Actor Scott Brady 1985 Holy Cross CemeteryFigure Skater Dona Lee Carrier DIES IN PLANE ACCIDENT 1961 Forest Lawn Glendale Cemetery"The Shootist" Producer, Football Player, & Actor Mike Frankovich 1992 Forest Lawn Glendale CemeteryBodybuilder, Stuntman, & Actor Bert M. Goodrich 1991 Valley Oaks CemeterySportsman Boyd Ellis 1974 Fairhaven Cemetery"Dodgers" Baseball Pitcher Bobby Castillo Jr. 2014 Rose Hills CemeteryGold Medal Olympic Basketball Champion John Haskell "Tex" Gibbons 1984 Rose Hills CemeteryRoad Racing Champion David MacDonald 1964 Rose Hills Cemetery

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