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Interview with Arianne 'Tex' Thompson, author of the Children of the Drought Series


Please welcome Arianne 'Tex' Thompson back to The Qwillery!



Interview with Arianne 'Tex' Thompson, author of the Children of the Drought Series




TQWelcome back to The Qwillery. Your newest novel, Dreams of the Eaten (Children of the Drought 3), was published on December 26, 2016. Has your writing process changed (or not) from when you wrote One Night in Sixes (Children of the Drought 1) to Dreams of the Eaten?

Tex:  I’m so glad to be back! And I would really like to tell you that I’ve become a much more stable, productive writer since my first book came out. Unfortunately, here in one handy visual chart was my word-count progress on Dreams of the Eaten. (It was due on October 21st).

Interview with Arianne 'Tex' Thompson, author of the Children of the Drought Series

As you can see, my process is apparently an exponential growth-curve of procrastination and deadline panic. Remember, kids: the only minute that counts is the last one!



TQWhat do you wish that you knew about book publishing when One Night in Sixes came out that you know now?

Tex:  You know, I cannot think of a single “overnight success” who has not been writing, publishing, and working in the community for at least a decade. Not even the so-called debut authors. It’s really easy not to realize that when all you see is their giant award-winning bestseller splashed everywhere you look. If I had, I would have stopped comparing myself to them a long time ago, and saved myself a lot of unproductive angst.



TQTell us something about Dreams of the Eaten that is not found in the book description.

Tex:  Y’know, when you’re trying to wrap up a trilogy and make it sound properly epic, all the packaging has to talk up the world-ending cataclysm. You don’t get to say, “by the way, there’s some funny stuff in here too. It isn’t all doom and gloom.” I wish the fantasy market in general was more tolerant of that kind of thing: I feel like we’re at our best (authors, publishers, and readers alike) when we don’t let the genre disappear up itself.



TQWhich character in the Children of the Drought series surprised you the most? Who has been the hardest character to write and why?

Tex:  This is an odd thing to admit, but my principal female character was the hardest one to write. Whenever I’m out in public, I’m usually operating half a dozen layers of empathy, situational awareness, and self-analysis, and it feels REALLY good to turn off one or two of those to write or roleplay a character, usually male, who doesn’t depend on them to navigate their world. Día is hard for me to write because she has to be even more vigilant and thoughtful than I am: as an outsider, a woman alone, and a visible minority, she has to walk through the world more carefully than I ever have. As it turns out, turning off a couple of your own mind-layers is easy – but adding temporary ones is tricky, intricate business.



TQPlease tell us about your fabulous covers!

Tex:  Oh, what covers they are! That is the work of the brilliant Tomasz Jedruszek, a professional artist from Poland whom Solaris commissioned to paint the covers for this series. I was very happy to be able to ask him for certain images and scenes, and happier still that they did not turn out exactly how I’d pictured them. For example, the town of Sixes is a mishmash of adobe buildings built over an old military fort – but what’s on the cover of One Night in Sixes looks more like a medieval European village.

Interview with Arianne 'Tex' Thompson, author of the Children of the Drought Series

That juxtaposition of old-world architecture with new-world landscapes and figures is a huge part of the cover’s appeal, I think, and perfectly reflects the idea of a ‘patchwork’ fantasyland. I love it, and am so lucky to have Tomasz’s beautiful work on my books!



TQWhy have you chosen to include or not chosen to include social issues in the Children of the Drought series?

Tex:  Honestly, sticking my sheltered nose into a political anthill was the last thing I wanted to do with my first novels - but I just couldn’t avoid it. The minute I chose to write a historical American setting, considering race and colonialism and identity became a moral mandate: to include people who have been misrepresented or left out, to build the fantasy world in a way that reflects the struggles of the real one, and (most importantly) to give the characters in that world access to the better future that we’re trying to create right now. I am the least-qualified person to judge how successful I’ve been in that effort, but it would have been tremendously irresponsible not to try.



TQWhich question about Dreams of the Eaten do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Tex:  “Tex, did a fan really actually make this incredible handmade doll version of your main character and make you cry when she surprised you with it at your launch party?”

Interview with Arianne 'Tex' Thompson, author of the Children of the Drought Series

Yes. Her name is MaryLou Condike, and yes. Yes, she did.



TQPlease give us one or two of your favorite non-spoilery lines from Dreams of the Eaten.

Tex:  Well, if there’s one thing I’ve learned from Tolkien, it’s that you can’t finish a fantasy trilogy without someone climbing a mountain. And if there’s one thing I’ve learned from hiking the Sandias in Albuquerque for research, it’s that that is WAY harder than the hobbits make it look.

Elim had never had much of an opinion about mountains. He could approve of them on principle, in much the same way as he would lend his endorsement to petticoats, libraries, and the moon.

That was before he’d tried to climb one.

Now, he’d decided, mountains were awful – just the most horrible, hateful, unnatural piles of shameless man-eating lies. And about the only thing worse than the rocks – the ones in his shoes, the ones in his path, the ones hanging down overhead waiting to crush him like a lizard under a dropped brick – was the nauseating drop mere inches from his feet, the yawning abyss of scrubby red earth just waiting for him to put a foot wrong, just waiting to receive his broken body like a window-pane whacked by a cross-eyed idiot pigeon.

“Hell,” he swore as he inched past. “I was tired of living anyway.”



TQWhat's next?

Tex:  I don’t get a chance to mention it much, but I am a huge fan of Terry Pratchett for all kinds of reasons, especially his Discworld publishing model: one big sandbox with multiple sets of characters, and lots of entry-points into the world and the series. I would like to do something similar: put these characters down for awhile and pick up a new set in some other corner of Droughtworld, for even more rural fantasy adventures. Stay tuned!



TQThank you for joining us again at The Qwillery.

Tex:  Thank you for having me!





One Night in Sixes
Children of the Drought 1
Solaris, July 29, 2014
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 464 pages

Interview with Arianne 'Tex' Thompson, author of the Children of the Drought Series
The border town called Sixes is quiet in the heat of the day. Still, Appaloosa Elim has heard the stories about what wakes at sunset: gunslingers and shapeshifters and ancient animal gods whose human faces never outlast the daylight.

And the daylight is running out. Elim's so-called 'partner' - that lily-white lordling Sil Halfwick – has disappeared inside the old adobe walls, hell-bent on making a name for himself among Sixes' notorious black-market traders. Elim, whose worldly station is written in the bastard browns and whites of his cow-spotted face, doesn't dare show up home without him.

If he ever wants to go home again, he'd better find his missing partner fast. But if he's caught out after dark, Elim risks succumbing to the old and sinister truth in his own flesh - and discovering just how far he'll go to survive the night.



Medicine for the Dead
Children of the Drought 2
Solaris, March 31, 2015
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 384 pages

Interview with Arianne 'Tex' Thompson, author of the Children of the Drought Series
The story of Appaloosa Elim continues.
Two years ago, the crow-god Marhuk sent his grandson to Sixes.
Two nights ago, a stranger picked up his gun and shot him.
Two hours ago, the funeral party set out for the holy city of Atali'Krah, braving the wastelands to bring home the body of Dulei Marhuk.

Out in the wastes, one more corpse should hardly make a difference. But the blighted landscape has been ravaged by drought, twisted by violence, and warped by magic - and no-one is immune. Vuchak struggles to keep the party safe from monsters, marauders, and his own troubled mind. Weisei is being eaten alive by a strange illness. And fearful, guilt-wracked Elim hopes he's only imagining the sounds coming from Dulei's coffin.

As their supplies dwindle and tensions mount, the desert exacts a terrible price from its pilgrims - one that will be paid with the blood of the living, and the peace of the dead.



Dreams of the Eaten
Children of the Drought 3
Solaris, December 27, 2016
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 384 pages

Interview with Arianne 'Tex' Thompson, author of the Children of the Drought Series
As the funeral cortege draws near, the crows begin to gather...

The stunning conclusion of this extraordinary trilogy.

After trials by fire and thirst, Appaloosa Elim's quest to bring home the body of the crow prince is finally nearing its end.

But the coffin is missing, the funeral party is hopelessly scattered, and the fishmen are hell-bent on revenge. Worse yet, the pilgrimage has disturbed an ancient power – and the earth is crumbling in its grip.

As the ground shakes and the crows gather, the final reckoning promises to unite the living and the dead in a battle for the land itself. One way or another, blood debts will come due, Elim will face his judgment, and the World That Is will be forever changed.





About Arianne "Tex" Thompson

Interview with Arianne 'Tex' Thompson, author of the Children of the Drought Series
Arianne "Tex" Thompson is home-grown Texas success story. After earning a bachelor’s degree in history and a master’s in literature, she channeled her passion for exciting, innovative, and inclusive fiction into the Children of the Drought – an internationally-published epic fantasy Western series from Solaris. Now a professional speaker and writing instructor at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Tex is blazing a trail through conferences, workshops, and fan conventions around the country – as an endlessly energetic, relentlessly enthusiastic one-woman stampede. Find her online at www.TheTexFiles.com and on Twitter as @tex_maam!



Guest Blog by Arianne 'Tex' Thompson: "You Got Western in my Fantasy!" - September 13, 2014


Please welcome Arianne 'Tex' Thompson to The Qwillery as part of the 2014 Debut Author Challenge Guest Blogs. One Night in Sixes will published on July 29th by Solaris Books.



Guest Blog by Arianne 'Tex' Thompson:




"You Got Western in my Fantasy!"


Nonsense – it was already there.


This year, I had an egregiously good time at ArmadilloCon in Austin, Texas. One of the panels I participated in was called Space Westerns - moderated by the unrelentingly excellent Bill Crider. At one point, he asked us a question: how should we define a Western?


Well, it's set in the American West, for one thing. (Except when it's Australian, like Quigley Down Under, or Canadian, like the Trail of the Yukon series, or African, like The Jackals - and let's not even get into all those Zapata Westerns in Mexico.)


And there's cowboys, of course. You can't have a Western without a hefty helping of square-jawed gunslingers. (Disregarding Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman; Little Big Man; and Zane Grey's Riders of the Purple Sage, naturally.)


But it's about the time period, more than anything – the frontier and the closing of the West in the 19th century. (Provided we don't count Justified, Once Upon a Time in Mexico, or any of the Leatherstocking Tales.)


In seriousness, though, I believe the question is worth asking: what is the essence of a Western? Of all genres, it's the one that seems most bound to a particular place and time – and yet it's constantly spilling over into other places and times, and even other genres. We've got spy Westerns (Wild Wild West), thriller Westerns (No Country for Old Men), comedy Westerns (Blazing Saddles), kids' Westerns (Rango), and absolutely every flavor of supernatural sci-fi and fantasy Western imaginable.


So there must be more to it than the big hats and six-guns – something behind the tropes and props that keeps us coming back to Sheriff Woody, even in the age of Buzz Lightyear. Certainly there must be a reason why the 19th century American West is so much more firmly cemented in our imaginations than, say, the antebellum South, or colonial New England. But what is it?


Well, here is a thought. Whether we're talking about the marshal versus the outlaws, the lone man braving the wilderness, or the coming of the railroad, the Western has an uncanny knack for tapping into some of our oldest fears. Watch yourself, it seems to say. Look sharp and step lightly – because you're on your own out here.


And let me tell you something – that is EXACTLY the feeling I get from all my favorite fantasy. Now there's a genre that's short on prerequisites! No maps, dates, or genre checklists needed here: the only requirement for fantasy is that it takes place outside the world as we know it. Maybe we're leaving the Shire behind to venture into the big, wide world. Maybe strange creatures are stepping out of the shadows of midtown Manhattan – or maybe we're the ones stepping out of the wardrobe and into Narnia. Regardless, our only guarantee in this part of the bookstore is that we're not in Kansas anymore.


Which, if you ask me, makes it a perfect complement for the Western. At the end of the day, the Western ultimately centers on the conflict between the world you know and the world you don't – and fantasy is the world you don't.


And if that's true, then maybe these two genres share more DNA than we thought – in fact, maybe they have a common ancestor. Think about Beowulf. Think about the Danes huddled together in their mead hall, desperately hoping to survive the night... and think about the dark, wild world outside the fire's light. Enter the hero, the stranger, the gunslinger who will fight the monsters in defense of humanity and civilization – leaving behind ordinary people who know they won't see a man of his caliber again. It's a hell of a story, isn't it? Hardly surprising that we've been telling it for literally thousands of years.


So maybe it's time we stopped thinking of Firefly and The Dark Tower and all the rest as cross-genre novelties and gave them their proper acknowledgement: as stories told with two facets of an idea that's as old and potent as we are.





One Night in Sixes
Children of the Drought One
Solaris, July 29, 2014
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 464 pages

Guest Blog by Arianne 'Tex' Thompson:
The border town called Sixes is quiet in the heat of the day. Still, Appaloosa Elim has heard the stories about what wakes at sunset: gunslingers and shapeshifters and ancient animal gods whose human faces never outlast the daylight.

And the daylight is running out. Elim's so-called 'partner' - that lily-white lordling Sil Halfwick – has disappeared inside the old adobe walls, hell-bent on making a name for himself among Sixes' notorious black-market traders. Elim, whose worldly station is written in the bastard browns and whites of his cow-spotted face, doesn't dare show up home without him.

If he ever wants to go home again, he'd better find his missing partner fast. But if he's caught out after dark, Elim risks succumbing to the old and sinister truth in his own flesh - and discovering just how far he'll go to survive the night.





About Tex

Guest Blog by Arianne 'Tex' Thompson:
Arianne "Tex" Thompson is home-grown Texas success story. After earning a bachelor’s degree in history from UT Dallas and a master’s degree in literature from the University of Dallas, she went on to become a community college professor, teaching the fundamentals of English to adults writing below the eighth-grade level. Now a master teacher for academic tutoring and test prep services, as well as the managing editor for the DFW Writers Conference, Tex is a regular feature at high schools, writing conferences, and genre conventions alike.

With her first book, a ‘rural fantasy’ novel called One Night in Sixes, Tex joins the growing ranks of Solaris authors committed to exciting, innovative and inclusive science fiction and fantasy.  Find her online at www.thetexfiles.com and on Twitter as @tex_maam!


Interview with Arianne 'Tex' Thompson, author of One Night in Sixes - July 23, 2014


Please welcome Arianne 'Tex' Thompson to The Qwillery as part of the 2014 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. One Night in Sixes will published on July 29th by Solaris Books.



Interview with Arianne 'Tex' Thompson, author of One Night in Sixes - July 23, 2014




TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery. When and why did you start writing?

Tex:  You know, I always see these great author bios that make me green with envy – "I learned to read when I was a zygote and wrote my first short story in pureed carrots on my high-chair table" – but the semi-ridiculous truth is that I first hit on the idea of writing a novel in 11th grade, and even then it was mostly as a lark. It took a whole lot longer to grow any sense of urgency.



TQ:  Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Tex:  Well, the story behind this particular story is so long and bizarre (it's actually the resurrected Frankenstein's-monster version of that first 11th-grade novel) that I'm not even sure I have a capital-P Process yet. But so far, I think I enjoy writing most when I have a few anchor-point scenes in mind, and enough leeway to make new discoveries on my way from one to the next.



TQ:  What is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Tex:  Definitely, definitely time. I'm one of these people who doesn't want to step through the wardrobe into Narnia until I am 100% caught up on all real-world responsibilities and can enjoy a long, leisurely frolic in fantasyland. I've learned the hard way that that kind of "dessert-last" thinking is a GREAT way not to get anything finished, ever – but I'm still a long way from having a regular, sustainable writing routine.



TQ:  Who are some of your literary influences? Favorite authors?

Tex:  Oh, boy – well, this might sound strange, but when you think about it, Terry Pratchett and William Faulkner actually have a heck of a lot in common. I love their sharp turns of phrase, and how they can bring a place to life (and Yoknapatawpha County is every bit as fantastical as Ankh-Morpork!) More than that, though, I love how they treat every character as a fully-realized person. There are good characters in their books and bad ones, big roles and small ones, but nobody is a straw man or a punching bag or a stereotype. Any author who gives that kind of love and respect even to their villains and bit parts is someone I admire.



TQ:  Describe One Night in Sixes in 140 characters or less.

Tex:  "It's a cowboys-and-Indians story: the cowboy's accidentally shot an Indian, and if the family doesn't come after him, the fishmen will."



TQ:  Tell us something about One Night in Sixes that is not in the book description.

Tex:  Actually, one thing that I haven't really gotten to advertise much is that this world is one that runs on "culture magic." Basically, if you live the way your ancestors lived – eat what they ate, speak their language, work their land, and follow their customs – you get these supernatural powers that are specific to your culture and community. That's had a huge impact on the clash of cultures here. On the one hand, the settlers from the east have industrialized and spread out so quickly that most of their magic is gone. On the other, the native peoples in the west have used their power to defend their land and freedom, but are also having to decide how much of their old ways they can afford to keep in this new, changing world.



TQ:  What inspired you to write One Night in Sixes? The novel has been described by your publisher as a "Western-influenced rural fantasy novel." What is a "rural fantasy"? Which Westerns count among your favorites?

Tex:  Well, for me, the Western is defined less by geographic location than by atmosphere – you know, the frontier, the great unknown, and the sense that humanity is a fragile speck in a vast, dangerous world. I think that's one reason why it's so spec-fic friendly – you can re-imagine the Western into something like Star Trek, Firefly, or The Dark Tower without losing a bit of that. (I have a big love for all three of those, by the way – though for straight Westerns, I am a huge fan of True Grit in all its forms, and HBO's Deadwood. I applaud any storyteller who can reach past traditional heroic "types" to include people we don't get to see as often, and make them important without making them invincible. Show me someone who can save the day – or ruin it! – without ever picking up a gun, and I'll show you my money.)

Still, if we were to re-tell The Grapes of Wrath with a herd of migrating giants fleeing a drought, or imagine the creatures from Wizard of Oz overrunning Dust Bowl-era Kansas – to my mind, those would be "rural" fantasy stories, but not Western as such. And I like that, because it gives us so much room to explore a world beyond bright city lights, but without always centering the story on the clash between civilization and wilderness.



TQ:  What sort of research did you do for One Night in Sixes?

Tex:  As it happens, I did the usual obligatory bucketloads of homework about all the particulars: educating myself on 19th-century architecture, horse handling, the geography of the American Southwest, and so on. But I think the most important part of my research was actually going to New Mexico – visiting not only the nifty old ghost towns and monuments, but also the living pueblos and modern communities. I'm acutely aware of how poorly and infrequently American Indians have been represented in pop culture – and while I want to do a good job all around, I am especially anxious to do justice to their fictional analogues. I'm in no position to judge the success of my efforts on that front, but having the opportunity to visit and be a guest in real, living communities has been a tremendous blessing.



TQ:  Who was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Tex:  Elim is definitely an easy character to inhabit: he's thoughtful and mellow and sympathetic enough that thinking from his perspective isn't much of a stretch. Strangely enough, my biggest challenge has been with Día, the grave bride (a kind of "science nun", so to speak.) She's a deeply religious young black woman who divides her time between studying the living and burying the dead – and while she's one of my absolute favorite characters, her experience is so far outside mine that I'm not at all comfortable "winging it" with her. I feel like I really need to triple-check everything to do her justice.



TQ:  Give us one or two of your favorite non-spoilery lines from One Night in Sixes.

Tex:  Haha, well, I'm monstrously terrible at one-line anything, but here's a bit I like, from chapter 1. Elim and Sil have failed in their horse-selling expedition, and Elim is about to console himself with an all-you-can-eat chowdown.

"For his part, Elim intended to stuff his guts enough to last him all the way through until next year... presuming of course that there was still going to BE a next year, which was another item on that whole long list of things that Elim had no ability to order, and sometimes even to understand.

In view of which, it became all the more critically important to keep a two-handed hold on your plate, and full faith in the immediate comfort and solace of pie."



TQ:  What's next?

Tex:  Well, I'm currently editing the sequel to One Night in Sixes, called Medicine for the Dead, which will hopefully be out in March 2015. And as we say in Texas, "Lord willing and the creek don't rise," these two books will do well enough that I'll get to write the third book, which will finish the story. Fingers crossed, anyway!



TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Tex:  Thank you so much for having me!





One Night in Sixes
Children of the Drought One
Solaris, July 29, 2014
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 464 pages

Interview with Arianne 'Tex' Thompson, author of One Night in Sixes - July 23, 2014
The border town called Sixes is quiet in the heat of the day. Still, Appaloosa Elim has heard the stories about what wakes at sunset: gunslingers and shapeshifters and ancient animal gods whose human faces never outlast the daylight.

And the daylight is running out. Elim's so-called 'partner' - that lily-white lordling Sil Halfwick – has disappeared inside the old adobe walls, hell-bent on making a name for himself among Sixes' notorious black-market traders. Elim, whose worldly station is written in the bastard browns and whites of his cow-spotted face, doesn't dare show up home without him.

If he ever wants to go home again, he'd better find his missing partner fast. But if he's caught out after dark, Elim risks succumbing to the old and sinister truth in his own flesh - and discovering just how far he'll go to survive the night.






About Tex

Interview with Arianne 'Tex' Thompson, author of One Night in Sixes - July 23, 2014
Arianne "Tex" Thompson is home-grown Texas success story. After earning a bachelor’s degree in history from UT Dallas and a master’s degree in literature from the University of Dallas, she went on to become a community college professor, teaching the fundamentals of English to adults writing below the eighth-grade level. Now a master teacher for academic tutoring and test prep services, as well as the managing editor for the DFW Writers Conference, Tex is a regular feature at high schools, writing conferences, and genre conventions alike.

With her first book, a ‘rural fantasy’ novel called One Night in Sixes, Tex joins the growing ranks of Solaris authors committed to exciting, innovative and inclusive science fiction and fantasy.  Find her online at www.thetexfiles.com and on Twitter as @tex_maam!


2014 Debut Author Challenge Update - One Night in Sixes by Arianne 'Tex' Thompson


2014 Debut Author Challenge Update - One Night in Sixes by Arianne 'Tex' Thompson


The Qwillery is pleased to announce the newest featured author for the 2014 Debut Author Challenge.


Arianne 'Tex' Thompson

One Night in Sixes
Children of the Drought One
Solaris, July 22, 2014
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 464 pages

2014 Debut Author Challenge Update - One Night in Sixes by Arianne 'Tex' Thompson
The border town called Sixes is quiet in the heat of the day. Still, Appaloosa Elim has heard the stories about what wakes at sunset: gunslingers and shapeshifters and ancient animal gods whose human faces never outlast the daylight.

And the daylight is running out. Elim's so-called 'partner' - that lily-white lordling Sil Halfwick – has disappeared inside the old adobe walls, hell-bent on making a name for himself among Sixes' notorious black-market traders. Elim, whose worldly station is written in the bastard browns and whites of his cow-spotted face, doesn't dare show up home without him.

If he ever wants to go home again, he'd better find his missing partner fast. But if he's caught out after dark, Elim risks succumbing to the old and sinister truth in his own flesh - and discovering just how far he'll go to survive the night.


Solaris Acquires Novels by Arianne "Tex" Thompson and Silvia Moreno-Garcia


Solaris Books recently announced the acquisition of two novels - One Night in Sixes by Arianne "Tex" Thompson for publication in 2014 and Signal to Noise by Silvia Moreno-Garcia for publication in 2015.



PRESS RELEASE

Solaris acquires “progressive and inclusive
debut novel One Night in Sixes for 2014


Solaris Acquires Novels by Arianne
Solaris is pleased to announce that it has acquired the debut novel of Texan author Arianne "Tex" Thompson.

One Night in Sixes is a startlingly original Western-influenced rural fantasy novel that will be published in August 2014 with a stunning cover by Polish artist Tomasz Jedruszek.

This first novel from teacher Thompson is part of Solaris’s ongoing mission to publish the best science-fiction, fantasy, horror, and anthology titles from a diverse and progressive roster of authors from around the world.

The border town called Sixes is quiet in the heat of the day. Still, Appaloosa Elim has heard the stories about what wakes at sunset: gunslingers and shapeshifters and ancient earthly gods whose human faces never outlast the daylight.

If he ever wants to go home again, he’d better find his missing partner before they do. But if he’s caught out after dark, Elim risks succumbing to the old and sinister truth that lives in his own flesh - and discovering just how far he’ll go to survive the night.

Solaris editor-in-chief Jonathan Oliver said: “Sometimes you come across a novel that makes you want to jump to your feet and immediately announce it to the world. One Night in Sixes was just such a book. Arianne has achieved the near impossible by presenting the world with a staggeringly original work of fantasy full of rich characterisation and excitement. This is one of the most progressive and incisive works of fantasy for decades and I’m delighted to be publishing it.”


About the Author

Solaris Acquires Novels by Arianne
Arianne "Tex" Thompson is a native and lifelong resident of Texas. After earning a bachelor's degree in history from UT Dallas and a master's degree in literature from the University of Dallas, she went on to become a community college professor, teaching the fundamentals of English to adults writing below the eighth-grade level. Now a master teacher for academic tutoring and test prep services, as well as the managing editor for the DFW Writers Conference, Tex is a regular feature at high schools, writing conferences, and genre conventions alike. With her first book, a 'rural fantasy' novel called One Night in Sixes, Tex joins the growing ranks of Solaris authors committed to exciting, innovative and inclusive science fiction and fantasy.







PRESS RELEASE

Love, music and sorcery in Mexico City – Solaris
acquires new novel by Silvia Moreno-Garcia


“Moreno-Garcia always reaches beyond the obvious...
[she] can evoke a shudder with a mere description of sound.”
– Winnipeg Review


Solaris is pleased to announce that it has acquired a new novel by Mexican and Canadian author Silvia Moreno-Garcia.

Signal to Noise is a literary fantasy novel set against the background of Mexico City, ones of the world’s biggest cities and a unique setting for a story about the very real magic of music.

This latest acquisition by the award-winning publisher of science-fiction, fantasy, horror, and anthologies will be published in February 2015.

Solaris editor-in-chief Jonathan Oliver said: "I read Signal to Noise on a beautiful summer day, sitting in my back garden. Silvia's book utterly transported me and by the end I was left in pieces. This is a beautiful, powerful novel, quite unlike anything else I have read. I'm truly proud to be bringing this to Solaris."

Mexico City, 1988: Long before iTunes or MP3s, you said “I love you” with a mixtape. Meche, awkward and fifteen, has two equally unhip friends -- Sebastian and Daniela -- and a whole lot of vinyl records to keep her company. When she discovers how to cast spells using music, the future looks brighter for the trio. With help from this newfound magic, the three friends will piece together their broken families, change their status as non-entities, and maybe even find love...

Mexico City, 2009: Two decades after abandoning the metropolis, Meche returns for her estranged father’s funeral. It’s hard enough to cope with her family, but then she runs into Sebastian, and it revives memories from her childhood she thought she buried a long time ago. What really happened back then? What precipitated the bitter falling out with her father? And, is there any magic left?

Silvia said of the genesis of Signal to Noise: “Both my parents were radio announcers. So was my grandfather. I even had a brief stint in radio as a child and my mother used to take me to the radio station since I was a baby. Signal to Noise was an attempt to understand our fascination with music and sound.”


About the Author

Solaris Acquires Novels by Arianne
Mexican by birth, Canadian by inclination, Silvia Moreno-Garcia lives in beautiful British Columbia with her family and two cats. Her speculative fiction has been collected in This Strange Way of Dying and has appeared in a number of anthologies, including Imaginarium: The Best Canadian Speculative Writing. She is the winner of the Carter V. Cooper/Exile Short Fiction Competition and a finalist for the Manchester Fiction Prize. She tweets @silviamg and blogs at silviamoreno-garcia.com








Interview with Arianne 'Tex' Thompson, author of the Children of the Drought SeriesGuest Blog by Arianne 'Tex' Thompson: "You Got Western in my Fantasy!" - September 13, 2014Interview with Arianne 'Tex' Thompson, author of One Night in Sixes - July 23, 20142014 Debut Author Challenge Update - One Night in Sixes by Arianne 'Tex' ThompsonSolaris Acquires Novels by Arianne "Tex" Thompson and Silvia Moreno-Garcia

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