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Interview with J.P. Oakes, author of City of Iron and Dust

Please welcome J.P. Oakes to The Qwillery as part of the 2021 Debut Author ChallengeInterviews. City of Iron and Dustis published on July 6, 2021 by Titan Books.

Please join The Qwillery in wishing J.P. a Happy Book Birthday!






TQWelcome to The Qwillery. What is the first fiction piece you remember writing?

JPO:  When I was 4 or 5, I remember writing a one-page story about The Milky Bar kid who was in TV ads, and who seemed pretty cool to me at the time. I’m fairly sure there was an illustration involved as well.



TQAre you a plotter, a pantser or a hybrid?

JPO:  A plotter. At least from a narrative perspective. If I know how a scene opens and ends, and what critical information needs to be relayed that gives me the space to explore character, themes, and dialogue with that frame. For example, I’ll know a fight is going to happen, and who’s going to win, but I don’t know exactly how the fight is going to play out.



TQWhat is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

JPO:  Balancing the flow of information to the reader. Going into a project knowing everything about the backstory and motives, it’s tough to judge exactly when a reveal needs to be made, and what information has to be conveyed at what point. But my agent and editors help immeasurably with that.



TQWhat has influenced / influences your writing?

JPO: This might be a bit of a cop out answer, but I have a hard time thinking of things that haven’t influenced my writing. Books I read, TV shows I watch, games I play, politics, parenting, memes on social media… it’s all material, it all goes into the hopper. In broad strokes, I like New Weird, noir, fantasy, action-adventures. I think some of that shows through.



TQDescribe City of Iron and Dust using only 5 words.

JPO:  Goblins. Fae. Revolution. Drugs. Magic.



TQ:  Tell us something about City of Iron and Dust that is not found in the book description.

JPO:  The books pretty ambitious in its themes. Along the way I think I touch on capitalism, racism, and the redemptive power of art, among a fair few other things.



TQWhat inspired you to write City of Iron and Dust?

JPO:  Fundamentally, my kids and the phrase “Make America Great Again.” Over the past few years, there seems to have been a lot of looking back at a sort of 1950s golden age that never existed. Meanwhile, where I see hope, is when I look at the youth of today, and the generations to come. There’s so much progressive energy in Generation Z that fills me with joy, and I wanted to put those two forces against each other.



TQWhat sort of research did you do for City of Iron and Dust?

JPO:  Virtually none, I’m afraid. A little bit into the different types of fae, but I’ve taken enough liberties that it may not show.



TQPlease tell us about the cover for City of Iron and Dust.

JPO:  The cover doesn’t show a precise scene from the book. Rather, it’s a more evocative design piece by Julia Lloyd. I think she did an amazing job capturing the oppressive feel of the Iron City that’s at the heart of this book.



TQIn City of Iron and Dust who was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

JPO:  I have a character, Granny Spregg, who’ the deposed matriarch of a goblin house, who was an absolute joy to write. She foul-mouthed, and sarcastic, and wickedly clever, and whatever the thing you absolutely definitely shouldn’t say was exactly what she’d say. As someone who always struggles with a filter, that was fun. Meanwhile, Edwyll, who is a very earnest fae looking to transform the city through art was a much harder note for me to hit. I’m not sure what that says about me as a person…



TQDoes City of Iron and Dust touch on any social issues?

JPO:  Yes it does. For me, the Iron City—the city where the whole story takes place—is a metaphor for America, and the struggles and battles that are occurring in it right now. So, a lot of social ideas made their way into the book, or, at least, they did for me. Whether they translate to the reader or not, I can’t be sure, but even if they don’t hopefully there’s a fun story there for everyone anyway.



TQWhich question about City of Iron and Dust do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

JPO:  The question I’d loved to be asked is: has an awesome metal band written a song inspired by your book? Because, yes, they have! The black/death metal band Ashen Horde is releasing a track called “Archaic Convictions” inspired by the book, and it is absurdly cool. Check it out on bandcamp when you have a chance.



TQGive us one or two of your favorite non-spoilery quotes from City of Iron and Dust.

JPO

“A bouncer hulks in a doorway—the type with more knuckles than IQ points”

“Bravery, in his opinion, is just stupidity that happens to benefit others”



TQWhat's next?

JPO:  That’s a little up in the air right now. Writing has been slowed by the pandemic, but I have two dark fantasy projects I’m working on at the moment. Hopefully something good will happen with one of them.



TQThank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

JPO:  Thank you so much for having me, and thank you for the thoughtful questions.






City of Iron and Dust
Titan Books, July 6, 2021
Trade Paperback and eBook, 400 pages
“A fantastic book, full of wit and sharp humor, City of Iron and Dust careens through a modernized faerie at a breakneck pace, full of verve and unforgettable characters. Oakes spins a smart, electric, and sometimes snarky tale, showing that the beating heart of modern fantasy is alive and well.” – John Hornor Jacobs, author of A Lush and Seething Hell and The Incorruptibles

The Iron City is a prison, a maze, an industrial blight. It is the result of a war that saw the goblins grind the fae beneath their collective boot heels. And tonight, it is also a city that churns with life. Tonight, a young fae is trying to make his fortune one drug deal at a time; a goblin princess is searching for a path between her own dreams and others’ expectations; her bodyguard is deciding who to kill first; an artist is hunting for his own voice; an old soldier is starting a new revolution; a young rebel is finding fresh ways to fight; and an old goblin is dreaming of reclaiming her power over them all. Tonight, all their stories are twisting together, wrapped up around a single bag of Dust—the only drug that can still fuel fae magic—and its fate and theirs will change the Iron City forever.
Amazon : Barnes and Noble : Bookshop : Books-A-Million : IndieBound : Powell's
Google Play : Kobo






About J.P. Oakes

J.P. Oakes is a writer and creative director living on Long Island, where he drinks too much tea, overthinks dumb action movies, and indulges in profound nerdery. Follow him on social media @jp_oakes for flash fiction and thoughts on the writing process, or if you want to engage someone for many long hours on the topic of Bioware Games.








Website  ~  Twitter@jp_oakes


Interview with Nicole Jarvis, author of The Lights of Prague

Please welcome Nicole Jarvis to The Qwillery as part of the 2021 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. The Lights of Prague was published on May 25, 2021 by Titan Books.







TQWelcome to The Qwillery. What is the first fiction piece you remember writing?

Nicole:  I’m happy to be here! I remember writing a short story for fun when I was in elementary school. I was traveling with my childhood crush along the Nile to search for a monstrous giant crocodile. (My crush did not survive to the end of the story. Sometimes we have to make sacrifices for narrative tension!)



TQAre you a plotter, a pantser or a hybrid?

Nicole:  Plotter!



TQWhat is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Nicole:  Even though I carefully plot each draft, I never know if something works until the whole book is written out. I rely heavily on editing once I have everything on paper, but it makes for a lot of deleted and rewritten material!



TQWhat has influenced / influences your writing?

Nicole:  I’m influenced by everything around me, but travel often sparks the tone and plot of my work. I hope my books can give people the sense of exploring the world.



TQDescribe The Lights of Prague using only 5 words.

Nicole:  Flames. Lace. Fangs. Cobblestones. Secrets.



TQTell us something about The Lights of Prague that is not found in the book description.

Nicole:  Though the book description focuses on Domek Myska, the monster-hunting lamplighter, half the book is from the point of view of Lady Ora Fischerová, a beautiful widow who is far older than she looks.



TQWhat inspired you to write The Lights of Prague?

Nicole:  I was struck one night with the image of a lamplighter on a misty street jumping into danger—and getting sucked into a much bigger conspiracy—and the rest of the book demanded to be written from there!



TQThe novel is set in gaslight-era Prague. In your opinion what elements are required for a novel to be a Gaslamp fantasy?

Nicole:  Despite literally starring a lamplighter, I didn’t envision The Lights of Prague as a “Gaslamp Fantasy” when I wrote it! I was drawn to the idea of a character who brought not just light but safety to the dark streets, and the era of gaslamps was the perfect fit.



TQWhat sort of research did you do for The Lights of Prague?

Nicole:  Before I even started writing the first draft, I read several books about the setting to get an idea of the day-to-day life in 1868 Prague. Once I had the frame in place, I went into more detailed research dives on Wikipedia and JSTOR. Later, I visited Prague to envision the book on the ground!



TQPlease tell us about the cover for The Lights of Prague.

Nicole:  Julia Lloyd designed the cover and absolutely blew me away. In addition to being gorgeous and evocative, the cover shows two key landmarks that are central to the book’s plot.



TQIn The Lights of Prague who was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Nicole:  Ora was the easiest character to write. I found it natural to balance her light, clever voice and her private grief. The hardest was Kája, the will-o’-the-wisp. I ended up rewriting nearly all of his dialogue over the course of my edits to really nail his personality and plotline.



TQDoes The Lights of Prague touch on any social issues?

Nicole:  There are several social issues touched on in the book, but I was especially determined to include LGBTQ representation. As a bisexual woman, it was very important for me to write about queer characters. We have always existed, even when history has tried to erase us.



TQWhich question about The Lights of Prague do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Nicole

Question: Which character from The Lights of Prague would you get along with most in real life?

Answer: I would love to have a fancy dinner and joke around with Cord, Domek’s best friend! A charming nobleman with interesting hobbies, he’d know how to have a fun conversation.



TQGive us one or two of your favorite non-spoilery quotes from The Lights of Prague.

Nicole:  I’m still very partial to the opening line! I wanted to bring people right into the atmosphere of Prague at night—

“Dark water reflected the line of gas lamps along the path, the rippling lights echoing the stars stretching overhead.”



TQWhat's next?

Nicole:  I can’t say much, but I will say that my next project is set in Florence—and involved a lot of research into some fascinating historical figures!



TQThank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Nicole:  Thank you for having me!





The Lights of Prague
Titan Books, May 25, 2021
Trade Paperback and eBook, 416 pages
In the quiet streets of Prague all manner of mysterious creatures lurk in the shadows. Unbeknownst to its citizens, their only hope against the tide of predators are the dauntless lamplighters – secret elite of monster hunters whose light staves off the darkness each night. Domek Myska leads a life teeming with fraught encounters with the worst kind of evil: pijavice, bloodthirsty and soulless vampiric creatures. Despite this, Domek finds solace in his moments spent in the company of his friend, the clever and beautiful Lady Ora Fischerová - a widow with secrets of her own.

When Domek finds himself stalked by the spirit of the White Lady - a ghost who haunts the baroque halls of Prague castle – he stumbles across the sentient essence of a will-o’-the-wisp captured in a mysterious container. Now, as its bearer, Domek wields its power, but the wisp, known for leading travellers to their deaths, will not be so easily controlled.

After discovering a conspiracy amongst the pijavice that could see them unleash terror on the daylight world, Domek finds himself in a race against those who aim to twist alchemical science for their own dangerous gain.
Amazon : Barnes and Noble : Bookshop : Books-A-Million : IndieBound
Google Play : iBooks : Kobo





Photo by John Adrian
About Nicole

Nicole Jarvis has been writing stories as long as she can remember. After graduating with degrees in English and Italian from Emory University, Nicole moved to New York City and currently works in marketing at Bloomsbury Publishing, and lives in Manhattan with two cats named after children’s book characters. She loves listening to musicals, learning strange histories and thinking about the inner lives of superheroes. The Lights of Prague is her first novel.






Website  ~  Twitter @nicolejarvis



Interview with H.M. Long, author of Hall of Smoke


Please welcome H.M. Long to The Qwillery as part of the 2021 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. Hall of Smoke is published on January 19, 2021 by Titan Books.

Please join The Qwillery in wishing H.M. Long a very Happy Book Birthday!






TQWelcome to The Qwillery. What is the first fiction piece you remember writing?

H.M.:  Hello, thank you for having me!

The first proper story I recall writing was when I was about 11 or 12. No copies survive, but it was fantasy and around 60k, with lots of swords and pretty dresses.



TQAre you a plotter, a pantser or a hybrid?

H.M.:  I’ve always considered myself a pantser, but I’ve become more of a hybrid out of necessity. I’ll usually start out with a vague concept of character, world and goal, and then pants my way up to about 80% of the first draft, at which point I’ll plot the climax and restructure as needed.



TQWhat is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

H.M.:  Focus. I’m one of those writers who needs to be completely alone, without distractions or other responsibilities to tug at my concentration. Fortunately, my family is very respectful of this and I live in the middle of nowhere, so I’ve quiet aplenty.



TQWhat has influenced / influences your writing?

H.M.:  Other than many incredible authors, travel has hugely influenced my writing. During the time I wrote Hall of Smoke, I honeymooned in Wales and I lived near the Alps in Germany. I visited Austria on Switzerland for weekend hikes and cozy nights in mountain cabins, and those ever-present mountains saturated Hall of Smoke.



TQDescribe Hall of Smoke using only 5 words.

H.M.:  Woman with axe questions gods.



TQTell us something about Hall of Smoke that is not found in the book description.

H.M.:  In reading Hall of Smoke, you’re going to meet the gods in the flesh, on the page. They’re living, breathing, active participants in the story.



TQWhat inspired you to write Hall of Smoke? What appeals to you about writing fantasy?

H.M.:  I enjoyed series like Vikings and The Last Kingdom, but I wanted a primary female protagonist, complex, unyielding and fierce, and yet vulnerable. So I wrote one.

Fantasy itself appeals to me because of its freedoms. Though I strove to give the world and cultures of Hall of Smoke a real-world feel, my impulse is always to break out of the confines of the world we know – opening up the possibilities of an entirely new realm, with new beliefs and practices and, of course, magic.



TQWhat sort of research did you do for Hall of Smoke?

H.M.:  I didn’t do a lot of intentional research for Hall of Smoke, but the book was the product of a life-long love of history and many hours spend wandering through museums, visiting historical sites and devouring documentary series.



TQPlease tell us about the cover for Hall of Smoke.

H.M.:  The cover artist is the very talented Julia Lloyd, and it depicts Hessa, Hall of Smoke’s protagonist, holding an axe. Owls play a key role in the book – they’re the eyes and messengers of Eang, Goddess of War – so two owls are featured as well. One swoops down in the background, talons outstretched to grasp Hessa, while the other alights on her hand – bearing a message, and recognizing her as a priestess of Eang. The colours too, are symbolic, but I’ll leave that up to the reader to figure out!



TQIn Hall of Smoke who was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

H.M.:  The easiest character was Ogam, son of Eang. He emerged fully formed onto the page, full of life and bravado and one of my favourite backstories of the whole HOS world. The hardest was the protagonist Hessa, balancing her grief and questions of faith with the necessity of constantly moving forward and facing the next battle.



TQWhich question about Hall of Smoke do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

H.M.Who made Hall of Smoke’s map?

The map in the front of Hall of Smoke was designed and drawn by Cheryl Bowman, my dear friend and alpha reader, a talented artist and constructor of languages. You can find her on Instagram @conorthography.



TQGive us one or two of your favorite non-spoilery quotes from Hall of Smoke.

H.M.:  Pg 191, “There was no use hiding now. I screamed, but the voice was not my own. It never was, not when the Fire possessed me like this. The Algatt crumpled and two more took her place, diving to intercept me with howls of desperate challenge – and dread.”

Pg. 369, “’Look, Eangi,’ he whispered, voice barely penetrating the silent storm in my skull. ‘Watch the gods battle. This is our privilege, you and I; priest and priestess.”



TQWhat's next?

H.M.:  I’m currently working on two projects. One is a stand-alone sequel to Hall of Smoke, coming early 2022, and I can’t wait to share more about that soon! The other is my current work-in-progress, a swashbuckling adult fantasy with a dark folktale twist.



TQThank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

H.M.:  Thank you so much for having me!





Hall of Smoke
Titan Books, January 19, 2021
Trade Paperback and eBook, 432 pages
Epic fantasy featuring warrior priestesses and fickle gods at war, for readers of Brian Staveley’s Chronicles of the Unhewn Throne.

Hessa is an Eangi: a warrior priestess of the Goddess of War, with the power to turn an enemy’s bones to dust with a scream. Banished for disobeying her goddess’s command to murder a traveller, she prays for forgiveness alone on a mountainside.

While she is gone, raiders raze her village and obliterate the Eangi priesthood. Grieving and alone, Hessa – the last Eangi – must find the traveller and atone for her weakness and secure her place with her loved ones in the High Halls. As clans from the north and legionaries from the south tear through her homeland, slaughtering everyone in their path Hessa strives to win back her goddess’ favour.

Beset by zealot soldiers, deceitful gods, and newly-awakened demons at every turn, Hessa burns her path towards redemption and revenge. But her journey reveals a harrowing truth: the gods are dying and the High Halls of the afterlife are fading. Soon Hessa’s trust in her goddess weakens with every unheeded prayer.

Thrust into a battle between the gods of the Old World and the New, Hessa realizes there is far more on the line than securing a life beyond her own death. Bigger, older powers slumber beneath the surface of her world. And they’re about to wake up.






About H.M. Long

H. M. Long is a Canadian fantasy writer, author of HALL OF SMOKE and TEMPLE OF NO GOD, who loves history, hiking, and exploring the world. She lives in Ontario, but can often be spotted snooping about European museums or wandering the Alps with her German husband.







Website  ~  Twitter @hannah_m_long  ~  Instagram  ~  Facebook


Interview with Rio Youers


Please welcome Rio Youers to The Qwillery. Halcyon was published on July 10, 2018 in the US / Canada by St. Martin's Press and in the UK on October 23, 2018 by Titan Books.



Interview with Rio Youers




The QwilleryWelcome to The Qwillery. What is the first piece you remember writing?

Rio Youers:  I’ve been writing fiction for as long as I’ve been able to form sentences. The first story I remember writing—at five, maybe six years old—was called Jojo the Clown. It’s worth mentioning because it was twenty-four pages long (even at six I needed an editor). The first story I submitted for publication was called The Dog, a short piece about a telepathic killer (I was charmed by the idea of a psychic psycho). It wasn’t very good, and was promptly and justly rejected. The possibility of being published, though, was too appealing, so I submitted stories regularly from that point forward, amassing the rejections until I was good enough for an editor to say yes. It took many years.



TQWhat is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

RY:  I know a lot of writers tire quickly with the editing and proofing stages, but I love all of that—the process of refining the material. It’s like tuning a guitar. It plays better, and makes people happier, when the notes are true. The most challenging thing for me has always been beginning a new novel, working through the first 10 or 20,000 words, until the work finds its voice, and the characters begin to breathe on their own. That’s when the magic happens, when you can surrender some control and let the story unravel.



TQWhat has influenced / influences your writing?

RY:  So many things. Great fiction, obviously. Great storytelling, in any form. Good friends, good conversation. Good music. I absorb anything creative and moving. And that’s what I endeavor to bring to my fiction. Whether I manage it or not is a matter of opinion.



TQDescribe Halcyon using only 5 words.

RY:  Family love versus evil cult.



TQTell us something about Halcyon that is not found in the book description.

RY:  Valerie Kemp, aka Mother Moon, serves a group of powerful, iniquitous men who call themselves The Society of Pain. They believe that pain is the gateway to enlightenment, and have Valerie orchestrate acts of violence and terror to channel the suffering of the masses. Valerie’s goal is to escape their hold over her, and find her own path to enlightenment.



TQWhat inspired you to write Halcyon? What appeals to you about writing Supernatural Thrillers?

RY:  Trump’s administration, his divided nation, the domestic terrorism, mass shootings, civil unrest, the greed and corruption. This is a dark and dangerous era in American history, and I wanted explore that. Initially, I’d set out to write a Mosquito Coast-style novel about a family’s need to escape, but it developed into something more, something deeper. I’d always intended for Halcyon to be character-driven, with an emphasis on family and core American values, but in many ways it became a kind of critique—a social commentary. I’m fine with that. Halcyon is a timely novel, and I’m very proud of it.

The supernatural element gives my imagination more room to run free. Adding a dose of the paranormal means I can divert from the confines of reality, although reality has to form the basis of everything. Credibility is key.



TQWhat sort of research did you do for Halcyon?

RY:  Ugly research. Heartbreaking research. The novel deals with many difficult issues. Domestic terrorism, racial tension, mass shootings. I had to dig where I didn’t want to, and I’m pretty sure I hit every FBI watchlist along the way. It wasn’t all so bleak, though. Among the hundreds (perhaps thousands) of things I Googled were, “Average score for Zener card tests” and “What music do ten tears olds listen to?” But the big stuff, the main body of the research, was incredibly harrowing.



TQIn Halcyon who was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

RY:  The easiest: the main character, Martin Lovegrove. He’s a goofy, forty-something, doting family man. He’s basically me. Authors are regularly asked if they base their characters on themselves, and I think there’s a little part of me in every character I’ve created … but there’s a lot of me in Martin Lovegrove.

The hardest? Well, Martin’s daughters, Edith and Shirley, were a challenge. They’re ten and fifteen years old respectively, and the world has shifted gears since I was a kid. It’s not easy to convincingly represent the mind (and the will) of a young person, especially when your own mind is full of cobwebs that were spun at around the time Crockett and Tubbs were on TV.

Valerie Kemp was a challenge, too. She’s such a dark, complicated individual, with so many layers. Usually, I’ll uncover more about my characters as I write them—spend time with them—but Valerie kept leading me from one mystery to another, and I was at least two drafts deep before I understood what made her tick. She fascinated, enthralled, and horrified me. We had a blast.



TQWhich question about Halcyon do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

RY:  Did you cry at all while writing Halcyon? The answer: Yes, I did. I’m a very emotional man, I’m attached to my characters, and I cried many times.



TQGive us one or two of your favorite non-spoilery quotes from Halcyon.

RY:  I don’t know if they’re my favorite, exactly, but they’re quite important quotes: “When pleasure is denied, the channel to new possibilities, and alternate experiences, becomes broader.” And, “I think everybody in America should know how to treat gunshot wounds.”



TQWhat's next?

RY:  I’m currently working on a hi-octane, no-holds-barred action novel called Lola on Fire. I don’t want to reveal too much, but I will say that it’s a straight thriller, with no supernatural element, and that I’m channeling some of my favorite authors and filmmakers—Elmore Leonard and Martin Scorsese, to name but two—while writing it. If all goes to plan, I expect it to be published in early 2020.



TQThank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

RY:  The pleasure was all mine. Thank you.





Halcyon
Titan Books, October 23, 2018
Paperback and eBook, 528 pages

Interview with Rio Youers
Halcyon is the answer for anyone who wants to escape, but paradise isn’t what it seems.

A self-sustaining community on a breathtakingly beautiful island, Halcyon is run for people who want to live without fear, crime or greed. Its leader has dedicated her life to the pursuit of Glam Moon, a place of eternal beauty and healing, and believes the pathway there can only be found at the end of pleasure.

On the heels of tragedy, Martin Lovegrove moves his family to Halcyon. A couple of months, he tells himself, to retreat from the chaos and grind. Yet he soon begins to suspect there is something beneath Halcyon’s perfect veneer. As the founder captivates his young family, Martin sets out to discover the truth of the island, however terrible it might be, where something so perfect hides unimaginable darkness beneath…




Halcyon
St. Martin's Press, July 10, 2018
Hardcover and eBook, 384 Pages

Interview with Rio Youers
From the author of End Times and Point Hollow comes a new thriller, Rio Youers's Halcyon

HALCYON is the answer for all Americans who want to escape, but paradise isn't what it seems. A beautiful island in the middle of Lake Ontario—a self-sustaining community made up of people who want to live without fear, crime, or greed. Halcyon is run by Valerie Kemp, aka Mother Moon, benevolent and altruistic on the outside, but hiding an unimaginable darkness inside. She has dedicated her life to the pursuit of Glam Moon, a place of eternal beauty and healing. And she believes the pathway there can only be found at the end of pleasure.

On the heels of tragedy, Martin Lovegrove moves his family to Halcyon. A couple of months, he tells himself, to retreat from the chaos and grind. He soon begins to suspect there is something beneath Halcyon’s perfect veneer and sets out to discover the truth—however terrible it might be—behind the island and its mysterious founder, Mother Moon.





About Rio

Interview with Rio Youers
© Sophie Hogan
RIO YOUERS is the British Fantasy Award–nominated author of End Times and Point Hollow. His short fiction has been published in many notable anthologies, and his novel Westlake Soul was nominated for Canada’s prestigious Sunburst Award. Rio lives in southwestern Ontario with his wife, Emily, and their children, Lily and Charlie.




Website  ~  Facebook  ~  Twitter @Rio_Youers

Review: The Predator: Hunters and Hunted - Official Movie Prequel


The Predator: Hunters and Hunted - Official Movie Prequel
Author:  James A. Moore
Publisher:  Titan Books, July 31, 2018
Format:  Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 322 pages
List Price:  US$7.99 (print);  US$7.99 (eBook)
ISBN:  9781785654268 (print); 9781785657931 (eBook)
Review Copy:  Reviewer's Own

Review: The Predator: Hunters and Hunted - Official Movie Prequel
For centuries Earth has been visited by warlike creatures that stalk mankind’s finest warriors. Their goals unknown, these deadly hunters kill their prey and depart as invisibly as they arrived, leaving no trace other than a trail of bodies.

When Roger Elliott faced such a creature during the Vietnam War, he didn’t expect to survive. Nor did he expect that, decades later, he would train the Reapers—a clandestine strike force attached to Project Stargazer. Their mission: to capture one of the creatures, thus proving its existence, disassembling its tech, and balancing the odds between the HUNTERS AND HUNTED



Brannigan's Review

James A. Moore’s The Predator: Hunters and Hunted is the official prequel to the upcoming film The Predator directed by Shane Black. After the original Predator film came out in 1987, I immediately became a fan. The last Predator film was released in 2010. I’ve only read a few issues of the many different comics starring the Predator, and I’ve never read any of novels about the character. I am, however, a fan of a good novelization as they often give out little nuggets of information that you don’t get in the movie. So when I saw this book the other day, I couldn’t resist grabbing it and giving it a go.

Jame A. Moore is a very engaging writer that takes a hold of you and throws you off a cliff. He quickly introduces you to several characters, some who show up on the list of characters in the upcoming film and others that don’t -- General Woodhurst, Roger Elliott of the CIA, and Tomlin the leader of The Reapers, a Black ops group tasked with finding and hunting down a Predator.

Woodhurst is your stoic military general, stone-faced and quiet, Roger Elliott is a haunted ex-military man, who survived an encounter against a Predator during the Vietnam war and is tasked with the job of training the Reapers. Tomlin is a dedicated skilled Patriot. Out of the three of these men, Roger Elliott is the most developed character as we spend time with him during his first encounter with the Predator. Currently he's a grizzled recovering alcoholic living with the horror he experienced.

One aspect of the book I really enjoyed is the time we spend in the Predator’s mind as he goes about hunting down humans. I’m not sure if this has been done in comics or past novels, but it’s an enjoyable aspect of the book that fills a niche you don’t get in the films.

Besides the Predator, the other antagonist is Traeger, a man who is helping General Woodhurst gain congressional funding for their project, but you quickly see Traeger is the typical, greedy double-dealing baddie looking for ways to profit from the capture of an alien with advanced tech.

Moore fills the book up with as much action as possible while fleshing out some of the Predator mythos. I don’t think I’m spoiling anything because the trailers of the upcoming movie show the Reapers are successful in capturing the Predator. My only disappointment in the book was the fact that the Predator got captured fairly quickly. I would have enjoyed a little more of a drawn out hunt, but it was still very entertaining.

The Predator: Hunters and Hunted is an amazing prequel novelization. It did it’s job. I can’t wait till the movie comes out. It’s yet to be see how smoothly it lines up with opening of the upcoming film. There is adult language and violence in the book, so I would only recommend the book to adults. I would, without hesitation, recommend anyone who is a fan of the film series and looking forward to the new movie to go out and grab the prequel.

Interview with Francesco Dimitri, author of The Book of Hidden Things


Please welcome Francesco Dimitri to The Qwillery, as part of the 2018 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. The Book of Hidden Things is published on July 3rd by Titan Books.

Please join The Qwillery in wishing Francesco a Happy Publication Day!



Interview with Francesco Dimitri, author of The Book of Hidden Things




TQWelcome to The Qwillery. What is the first piece you remember writing?

Dimitri:  Thank you for having me! I remember it very clearly: I wrote it at eleven or so, and it was a short story with a nameless character drawing a parallel between the battle of Waterloo and the ineluctable fate of humanity. Yeah, I was an intense kid.



TQAre you a plotter, a pantser or a hybrid?

Dimitri:  A total pantser on the first draft, a moderate plotter on the others. To me, a ‘story’ is people doing stuff. You put specific people in a specific situation and see what happens. If you have the right characters, and you are honest about what they do and how they feel, what happens is your story. Then you go back and tidy it up.



TQWhat is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Dimitri:  Having a life while I am working on a first draft. Everything that is not the book is annoying. There are moments in which I truly hate myself for needing food and sleep.



TQWhat has influenced / influences your writing?

Dimitri:  Other books, yes, and films, sure, and TV series, of course, not to mention songs. But mostly people. I am a very sociable guy (when I am not writing a first draft): I enjoy being with other humans, listening to them. I don’t want my stories to be about other stories, books concerning other books. I want to write echoes of real life, with all its messiness, confusion, and glory.



TQDescribe The Book of Hidden Things in 140 characters or less.

Dimitri:  Your best friend disappeared. He did some nasty things. He might also be a saint. What do you do?



TQTell us something about The Book of Hidden Things that is not found in the book description.

Dimitri:  It is a very sensuous book. I really, really like being alive, and I wanted this story in particular to communicate the joys of food, scent, sex, even against the backdrop of pretty dark events. It is mind-boggling how fine-tuned to physical pleasures we are, and how often we deny them to ourselves for no good reason whatsoever.



TQWhat inspired you to write The Book of Hidden Things? What appeals to you about writing Contemporary Fantasy?

Dimitri:  The very idea of magic is wonderful. We have this word, that sometimes is a metaphor, sometimes is not, sometimes indicates a theatrical performance, sometimes is shorthand for love, sometimes is cheesy, sometimes terrifying. It is a maddenly vague, beautiful word. Magic to me is a topic on its own, rather than a tool to explore other topics. I want readers to feel the possibility of it, its strangeness and beauty. And I just find it easier to do that against a contemporary backdrop.



TQWhat sort of research did you do for The Book of Hidden Things?

Dimitri:  It is set in the place where I grew up. My main sources were memory, friends, and family.



TQPlease tell us about the cover for The Book of Hidden Things.

Dimitri:  It is beautiful and upsetting. It is so perfect that, had I not written the book first, I would write it now just for it to have that cover. Julia Lloyd, the artist, got perfectly well what I was trying to do, and came out with a work that is brazen but not gimmicky, a rare balance.



TQIn The Book of Hidden Things who was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Dimitri:  The easy one was Tony, because I see the world like him: at the end of the day, what matters to a good life are family and friends. You stick to them and they stick to you. The hardest… well. The landscape, I would say. I wanted to make the landscape a character, which required a touch of lyricism and a lot of restrain, and it was very easy to mess up. I hope I didn’t. All I can say is, I tried.



TQWhy have you chosen to include or not chosen to include social issues in The Book of Hidden Things?

Dimitri:  There are social issues echoing through the book – organised criminality, the taken-for-granted sexism of the place and of people’s gaze - but this is a book about personal matters, and I wanted to keep it close and personal. A lot of social issues would go away if only we were better adjusted grown-ups.



TQWhich question about The Book of Hidden Things do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Dimitri:  The question is, ‘was it a pleasure to write?’, and the answer is, ‘yes, and I hope it is going to be a pleasure to read.’



TQGive us one or two of your favourite non-spoilery quotes from The Book of Hidden Things.

Dimitri:  A gentleman does not quote himself.



TQWhat's next?

Dimitri:  I am putting the last touches on a nonfiction book on sense of wonder. Very soon I will start writing my next novel, but I tend not to talk about stuff that is not finished or at least almost there…



TQThank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Dimitri:  Thank you, guys!





The Book of Hidden Things
Titan Books, July 3, 2018
Trade Paperback and eBook,

Interview with Francesco Dimitri, author of The Book of Hidden Things
Four old school friends have a pact: to meet up every year in the small town in Puglia they grew up in. Art, the charismatic leader of the group and creator of the pact, insists that the agreement must remain unshakable and enduring. But this year, he never shows up.

A visit to his house increases the friends' worry; Art is farming marijuana. In Southern Italy doing that kind of thing can be very dangerous. They can’t go to the Carabinieri so must make enquiries of their own. This is how they come across the rumours about Art; bizarre and unbelievable rumours that he miraculously cured the local mafia boss’s daughter of terminal leukaemia. And among the chaos of his house, they find a document written by Art, The Book of Hidden Things, which promises to reveal dark secrets and wonders beyond anything previously known.

Francesco Dimitri's first novel written in English, following his career as one of the most significant fantasy writers in Italy, will entrance fans of Elena Ferrante, Neil Gaiman and Donna Tartt. Set in the beguiling and seductive landscape of Southern Italy, this story is about friendship and landscape, love and betrayal; above all it is about the nature of mystery itself.





About Francesco

Interview with Francesco Dimitri, author of The Book of Hidden Things
Francesco Dimitri is an Italian author and speaker living in London. He is on the Faculty of the School of Life. He is considered one of the foremost fantasy writers in Italy, and his works have been widely appreciated by non-genre readers too. A film has been made from his first novel, La Ragazza dei miei Sogni. The Book of Hidden Things is his debut novel in English.



Twitter @fdimitri

Spotlight - The Book of Hidden Things by Francesco Dimitri


The Book of Hidden Things by Francesco Dimitri will be published in July by Titan Books. The Qwillery will be featuring the novel in the 2018 Debut Author Challenge.


The Book of Hidden Things
Titan Books, July 3, 2018
Trade Paperback and eBook
   (Debut novel in English)

Spotlight - The Book of Hidden Things by Francesco Dimitri
Four old school friends have a pact: to meet up every year in the small town in Puglia they grew up in. Art, the charismatic leader of the group and creator of the pact, insists that the agreement must remain unshakable and enduring. But this year, he never shows up.

A visit to his house increases the friends' worry; Art is farming marijuana. In Southern Italy doing that kind of thing can be very dangerous. They can’t go to the Carabinieri so must make enquiries of their own. This is how they come across the rumours about Art; bizarre and unbelievable rumours that he miraculously cured the local mafia boss’s daughter of terminal leukemia. And among the chaos of his house, they find a document written by Art, The Book of Hidden Things, which promises to reveal dark secrets and wonders beyond anything previously known.

Francesco Dimitri's first novel written in English, following his career as one of the most significant fantasy writers in Italy, will entrance fans of Elena Ferrante, Neil Gaiman and Donna Tartt. Set in the beguiling and seductive landscape of Southern Italy, this story is about friendship and landscape, love and betrayal; above all it is about the nature of mystery itself.

Spotlight - A Demon in Silver by R.S. Ford


Coming in June from Titan Books the start of the War of the the Archons trilogy  - A Demon in Silver by R.S. Ford.


A Demon in Silver
War of the Archons 1
Titan Books, June 12, 2018
Trade Paperback and eBook, 400 pages

Spotlight - A Demon in Silver by R.S. Ford
In a world where magic has disappeared, rival nations vie for power in a continent devastated by war.

When a young farm girl, Livia, demonstrates magical powers for the first time in a century there are many across the land that will kill to obtain her power. The Duke of Gothelm’s tallymen, the blood-soaked Qeltine Brotherhood, and cynical mercenary Josten Cade: all are searching for Livia and the power she wields.

But Livia finds that guardians can come from the most unlikely places… and that the old gods are returning to a world they abandoned.





About R.S. Ford

Spotlight - A Demon in Silver by R.S. Ford
R.S. Ford originally hails from Leeds in the heartland of Yorkshire but now resides in the wild fens of Cambridgeshire. His previous works include the raucous steampunk adventure, Kultus, and the grimdark fantasy trilogy, Steelhaven.




Interview with James Bradley, author of Clade


Please welcome James Bradley to The Qwillery as part of the of the 2017 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. Clade is published on September 5th by Titan Books.

Please join The Qwillery in wishing James a Happy Publication Day!



Interview with James Bradley, author of Clade




TQWelcome to The Qwillery. When and why did you start writing?

James:  Most writers I know always wrote, but although I was always a great reader it never occurred to me to write until I was in my early 20s. I suppose that was partly because I grew up without knowing anybody who write, and in a place and a time where it always seemed like books and writers came from somewhere else. And then, one day, I read and loved Michael Ondaatje’s novel, In the Skin of a Lion, and was incredibly struck by the way it said so many things I’d always thought and felt but not realised other people felt and thought. That made me wonder whether perhaps I might be able to write something that captured some of the things that struck me about the world, and what it was like being in it, and over the next few months I started writing poetry, and later I began trying to write fiction that took some of the intensity of feeling and compression you get in poetry into stories, and eventually novels.



TQAre you a plotter, a pantser or a hybrid?

James: I think most writers are a combination of the two, but I’m basically a pantser. I tend to have a general idea of the structural shape of what I’m writing, and a few scenes and probably a feeling I’m trying to capture, but what always matters most to me is voice and rhythm, so I tend to piece the books together almost like poems or music. In some ways that’s even more the case now I have kids, and I tend to be writing in short bursts rather than sustained blocks of time, but having kids (and getting older!) has also made me a lot more disciplined and focussed, so I’m more efficient in my inefficiency these days (or at least that’s what I tell myself!).



TQWhat is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

James: So many things! I hate the feeling I’m repeating myself, or I’ve said something before, which means that although I think there are a number of unifying interests I tend to write a completely different kind of book each time. But I also need to feel a book matters, in some deep sense, or that it’s getting at something real or true. One of the great things about writing Clade was knowing it did matter in that way: not only is it about a series of questions about climate change and Nature and the future I care about very much, it’s focussed on a series of questions about family and kids and love and all the complexities of that which feel very alive to me at the moment.



TQWhat has influenced / influences your writing?

James: My writing is influenced by a number of things. I’m fascinated by animals and the natural world, and the ways we think and don’t think about them. But I also love the sorts of things you can do with science fiction and the literatures of fantastic, and the toolbox they give you to talk about time and the uncanny, and in both Clade and a number of other things I’ve written in recent years I’ve tried to find ways of bringing those two things together.



TQDescribe Clade in 140 characters or less.

James: One family. Three generations. A world in flux. Love, loss, possibility. Also bees.



TQWhat inspired you to write Clade? What appeals to you about writing SF and particularly apocalyptic SF?

James: I don’t think it’s accidental there’s so much apocalyptic and dystopian fiction around at the moment. We live in a moment in which a whole lot of things that were once certain are coming apart or ending, and apocalyptic and dystopian fiction has always been one of the things we use to contain and explore the anxieties that kind of change induces. But I think we need to be a bit wary of that impulse as well, because imagining the apocalypse is also a way of saving ourselves from having to ask hard questions about what we do if the world doesn’t end: as Frederic Jameson famously said, it’s easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism. One of the beauties of science fiction – and one of the reasons it appeals to me – is that it gives us a toolbox with which to think about the future, and to imagine alternatives. And that mattered when I was writing Clade, because one of the things I wanted to do was to resist that kind of apocalyptic thinking, and use the idea we might have a future to create a space in which it was possible to see that history is long, the future isn’t set, and although there are some things we can’t change about what happens in coming decades, there are things we can change if we choose to.



TQPlease tell us about the title.

James: Clade is the scientific term for a group of organisms with a common ancestor and comes from the Greek word klados, or branch. I chose it because it describes the structure of the book, but also because I love the way the word itself is simultaneously so sleek and futuristic, but also echoes “glade”, so has all those associations of sacredness and beauty it has. I hope the book has some of that same combination of qualities.



TQWhat sort of research did you do for Clade?

James: Most of what happens in the novel is drawn from the scientific literature, or at least extrapolated from it, although I assumed sea levels would rise faster than they were predicted to when I wrote the novel. The scary thing was that while I was writing it, many of the things that happen in the book that were supposed to be decades in the future or – in one case – were pure science fiction, started to happen. That process has only accelerated since I finished the book. The permafrost is melting, the icecaps are beginning to collapse, sea level rises that were speculative five years ago now look likely by the end or even the middle of the century. That feeling reality is outpacing fiction is completely vertiginous, and frankly, terrifying.



TQPlease tell us about the cover for Clade.

James: The cover was designed by Adam Laszczuk, who is one of the designers at Penguin in Australia. I love it, but I also think it’s an incredibly clever cover, because it manages to simultaneously suggest the geological and the biological, and to capture the way the book is poised between the scientific and the natural.



TQIn Clade who was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

James: I suspect the easiest to write was Dylan, who appears in one of the later stories, perhaps because the world he was in – a post-pandemic one – was so intriguing and because I found his work building recreations of the dead so interesting. And I’m not sure he was the hardest, but the one I worried most about getting right was Noah, not just because he’s on the spectrum, and his experience of the world is very different to my own, but because I came to care about him terribly while I was writing the book. It was incredibly important to me he be a person with his own unique and meaningful perspective, that he grew up and found a path through life that mattered to him.



TQWhich question about Clade do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

James: I don’t know! Perhaps something about the way the book explores the increasing blurriness of the boundary between the real and the virtual, and the way the virtual becomes a repository of what has been lost as the natural (and then the human) world becomes more and more denuded.



TQGive us one or two of your favorite non-spoilery quotes from Clade.

James:

“There was a time when people talked about boiling the frog, arguing that the warming of the planet was too gradual to galvanise effective action, and although in recent years that has changed, delay have been replaced by panic, resistance by calls for more effective solutions, Adam still suspects that at some level people do not understand the scale of the transformation that is overtaking them. Even if it hasn’t happened yet, the reality is that this place is already lost, that some time soon the ocean will have it back, the planet will overwhelm it.”



TQWhat's next?

James: I’m just finishing the editing on the second volume of a series of young adult novels about alien spores that invade Earth’s biology, which have been great fun to write, but I’m also working on a new adult novel I’m really excited about and a non-fiction book about the ocean.



TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.





Clade
Titan Books, September 5, 2017
Trade Paperback and eBook, 320 pages

Interview with James Bradley, author of Clade
On a beach in Antarctica, scientist Adam Leith marks the passage of the summer solstice. Back in Sydney his partner Ellie waits for the results of her latest round of IVF treatment.

That result, when it comes, will change both their lives and propel them into a future neither could have predicted. In a collapsing England, Adam will battle to survive an apocalyptic storm. Against a backdrop of growing civil unrest at home, Ellie will discover a strange affinity with beekeeping. In the aftermath of a pandemic, a young man finds solace in building virtual recreations of the dead. And new connections will be formed from the most unlikely beginnings.





About James

Interview with James Bradley, author of Clade
Photo by Nicholas Purcell.
James Bradley is a novelist and critic. His books include the novels Wrack, The Deep Field, The Resurrectionist and most recently Clade, a book of poetry, Paper Nautilus and The Penguin Book of the Ocean. The Resurrectionist, a literary gothic horror, became a bestseller after being recommended by the Richard and Judy Book Club. He lives in Sydney, Australia.








Website  ~  Twitter @cityoftongues




Interview with G.S. Denning, author of the Warlock Holmes Novels


Please welcome G.S. Denning back to The Qwillery. The Hell-Hound of the Baskervilles (Warlock Holmes 2) was published on May 16th by Titan Books.



Interview with G.S. Denning, author of the Warlock Holmes Novels




TQWelcome back to The Qwillery. Your new novel, The Hell-Hound of the Baskervilles (Warlock Holmes 2), was published on May 16th. Has your writing process changed (or not) from when you wrote A Study in Brimstone (2016) to The Hell-Hound of the Baskervilles?

G.S.:  Well, I’m still stealing time at nights and weekends. Still running off to friendly restaurants who will bring me diet cokes for 3 hours while I write and write. The biggest change is that I have the fan feedback from book 1. Now I can hear what my readers value about the series and include more of that. For example, I had no idea how much people would like Grogsson and Lestrade. I had to sneak a whole Grogsson-centric story into Hell-hound when I realized how much people wanted him and how little I had. (Oh, that’s The Adventure of the Solitary Tricyclist, by the way.)



TQWhat do you wish that you knew about book publishing when A Study in Brimstone came out that you know now?

G.S.:  The podcast “Writing Excuses” taught me a lot. Traditional publishing is slow. Be ready, fellow authors. Nothing happens quickly except deadlines.

Yet, I’ve learned to be exceedingly grateful that I went the traditional publishing route. I can go see my books, in book-stores and I didn’t have to drive them there and brow-beat the proprietors into carrying them. There’s an audiobook version and I didn’t have to call all the audio companies and beg. As much as people complain about how slow traditional publishing is and how small the per-book percentage that goes to the author, I know perfectly well that I could never, never, never have gotten Warlock this far on my own. Thanks to the whole team!



TQTell us something about The Hell-Hound of the Baskervilles that is not found in the book description.

G.S.:  Part of it was a writing challenge to myself: write an origin story where the reader doesn’t realize they’re reading one. The book hasn’t been out long enough for me to find out if I’m really blindsiding people or they’re seeing through me. Time will tell.



TQWhich character in the Warlock Holmes series (so far) surprised you the most? Who has been the hardest character to write and why?

G.S.:  John Watson surprised me most. As I conceived this series, it was centered around the arcane wellspring that was Holmes. In a way, it still is. Yet every adventure is narrated by John. He filters all the wonder through this veneer of normalcy. He’s the everyman character—he’s an extension of how the reader would feel if they were thrust into a world of monsters. I’m surprised by how much of this story has become about John and what he thinks and feels as the story swirls on.

As far as the hardest: the women. Most geek-readers, most Holmes fans and the bulk of my fan-base are women. But the original stories are from another age. Women are rarely important in the original stories—victims seeking protection, for the most part. Of course, there’s Irene Adler, who bests Holmes, but she is in only one of the 60 stories. I’m trying to build female characters we can relate to and root for. Read the descriptions of Violet Smith in book 2 and Violet Hunter in book 3 and you’ll see how much I’m trying to build in cos-play opportunity and (especially in Hunter’s case) fan-fic launch points.



TQWhat do you think is the ongoing appeal of stories. etc. based on Sherlock Holmes?

G.S.:  Oh man, there’s a bunch. We love the odd-couple friendship of Holmes and Watson—how this super-powered individual needs a tie to normalcy (and that’s true of Warlock and Sherlock in equal measure). We love the pace of the stories and the chance to guess along and match our wits against the greatest detective. We love the language and the exotic-yet-familiar feel of Victorian London. We love the cloying promise that adventure and wonder hide in this everyday doldrum we inhabit. Some of us just like John’s moustache. As much as people can talk about how dated and out-of-touch the stories are, there’s a reason these things have stayed in print in over 150 countries and 125 years.



TQSherlock Holmes has appeared in 60 stories written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. How do you pick which stories to use?

G.S.:  The horrifying-yet-wonderful thing is: if these books keep doing as well as they are now, I’ll eventually have to use all 60. I’m pacing myself so I don’t use all 4 novels too early (right now, book 3 hasn’t got one). I’ve been trying to start strong by using recognizable favorites like Study in Scarlet, Hound of the Baskervilles and Speckled Band. I chose Baskervilles as the second story I ever wrote, because –duh- there’s a hell-hound in it. There was really no challenge introducing a supernatural element in to that particular story. Then again, I’m saving The Sussex Vampire, for the same reason.

The real hard part is creating an overall arch for the stories—the tale of how Moriarty came back to power from near-ruin and tricked Holmes and Watson into destroying the world. Readers have been very patient with me in book 1 and 2, where the Moriarty element is more in the background. Spoiler-alert: he comes to the fore in book 3.



TQPlease give us one or two of your favorite non-spoilery quotes from The Hell-Hound of the Baskervilles.

G.S.:

“No murder! Bad Horse! If you make a habit of it, I shall be cross with you!” –Warlock Holmes to Silver Blaze.

“In a proof that small words can have great import, I am holding a copy of Two Gentlemen In Verona. By this author’s interpretation, Verona is a down-on-her luck servant girl who finds herself sandwiched—quite literally—between the affections of a country squire and a poor groom.” –John Watson presenting an inappropriate gift to Mrs. Hudson.

“Aaaaaaaaaaiiieeah! Tears and wreck and wrack and ruin! The black one has returned! Prince of tatters! Prince of ash!” –Fasoul the Turk to… well… actually not Moriarty, but the person standing beside him.

“You cannot assume an animal’s behavior, based entirely on its breed.” –Warlock Holmes’s questionable advice on pre-judging hell-hounds.



TQWhat's next?

G.S.:  Book 3—My Grave Ritual—is underway and will be released May 15, 2018. It features the return of Moriarty to Holmes and Watson’s world and the growing sense that if Watson keeps meddling in the world of monsters and gods, he’s certain to die. There’s *ahem* a bit more romance, as well.

I’m realizing it would take between 8 and 9 books to finish the entire Holmes canon and I’m planning out my long-game. The Chekhov’s guns for both Holmes and Moriarty are already in place, but there’s a lot of maneuvering to be done before the final confrontation.

We’ve had two nibbles already for adapting Warlock to the big-or-small screen. Nothing really in the works yet, but I’d love to see my Holmes and Watson take their place amongst the other filmed adaptations and I’m doing my best to keep the writing screen-friendly.



TQThank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

G.S.:  Are you kidding? Thanks for having me back. All authors ever want to do is drone on and on about their work and you’ve provided us with exactly that chance. You’re like super-heroes and therapists, all rolled into one.





The Hell-Hound of the Baskervilles
Warlock Holmes 2
Titan Books, May 16, 2017
Trade Paperback and eBook, 320 pages

Interview with G.S. Denning, author of the Warlock Holmes Novels
The game’s afoot once more as Holmes and Watson face off against Moriarty’s gang, the Pinkertons, flesh-eating horses, a parliament of imps, boredom, Surrey, a disappointing butler demon, a succubus, a wicked lord, an overly-Canadian lord, a tricycle-fight to the death and the dreaded Pumpcrow. Oh, and a hell hound, one assumes.



Previously

A Study in Brimstone
Warlock Holmes 1
Titan Books, May 17, 2016
Trade Paperback and eBook, 368 pages

Interview with G.S. Denning, author of the Warlock Holmes Novels
Sherlock Holmes is an unparalleled genius. Warlock Holmes is an idiot. A font of arcane power, certainly. But he’s brilliantly dim. Frankly, he couldn’t deduce his way out of a paper bag. The only thing he has really got going for him are the might of a thousand demons and his stalwart companion. Thankfully, Dr. Watson is always there to aid him through the treacherous shoals of Victorian propriety… and save him from a gruesome death every now and again.





About G.S. Denning

Interview with G.S. Denning, author of the Warlock Holmes Novels
G.S. Denning is an author, improv comic, and speaker. ​

Before publishing Warlock Holmes, G.S. performed improv comedy for 20 years with Seattle Theatersports and Jet City Improv in Seattle, and SAC Comedy in Florida. He was a writer/performer for live shows at Disney's Epcot Center, wrote comedic reviews for Wizards of the Coast, and worked as a translation editor for Nintendo, ensuring that humor/context translated appropriately from Japanese to English video game scripts.

G.S. is extremely knowledgeable about history and all things pertaining to the geekiverse. He now gives engaging and educational talks to schools, inspiring students to turn their love of comic books and video games into a creative career or enriching hobby. He speaks at conventions, teaching writers improv comedy techiques that will improve their storytelling. He loves chatting on podcasts and is a terribly friendly geek. He has The Best Wife and The Most Beautiful Children and lives in Las Vegas.

Website  ~  Twitter @GS_Denning  ~  Facebook

Interview with J.P. Oakes, author of City of Iron and DustInterview with Nicole Jarvis, author of The Lights of PragueInterview with H.M. Long, author of Hall of SmokeInterview with Rio YouersReview: The Predator: Hunters and Hunted - Official Movie PrequelInterview with Francesco Dimitri, author of The Book of Hidden ThingsSpotlight - The Book of Hidden Things by Francesco DimitriSpotlight - A Demon in Silver by R.S. FordInterview with James Bradley, author of CladeInterview with G.S. Denning, author of the Warlock Holmes Novels

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