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Interview with Ellen Herrick, author of The Sparrow Sisters


Please welcome Ellen Herrick to The Qwillery as part of the 2015 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. The Sparrow Sisters was published by William Morrow on September 1, 2015.



Interview with Ellen Herrick, author of The Sparrow Sisters




TQWelcome to The Qwillery. When and why did you start writing?

Ellen:  Now, this might make you go “Whaaaaaat.” I used to work for a big publisher in New York. I read all the time, I read great stuff and not so great stuff and I did publicity for all the books. When you read and write for a living it is hard to think about telling a story. So, when I moved to London with my family I…OK, truth: I did dookey until the year before we came back to the States. My youngest basically dared me to write a novel. I had NEVER considered such a thing but as soon as my daughter set off on a ten day holiday with her brothers and my husband (leaving me alone to eat ice cream out of the carton, sing into my hairbrush and read), I sat at my kitchen counter and began The Sparrow Sisters, or something very like it. As President of the REALLY Late Bloomers’ Club let me say, Shwew, I did it.



TQAre you a plotter, a pantser or a hybrid?

Ellen:  Total pantser! I literally start every new writing day with “Once upon a time…” and hope for the best. I do lie around at night or while I driving start to play out where the story might go but my teeth start to itch if I try to outline.



TQWhat is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Ellen:  Finding a clean, well-lighted place, as Virginia Woolf said. And, acknowledging that what I do has value so I deserve the time and space to do it. I know, it’s a lot about confidence, I’m working on it.



TQWho are some of your literary influences? Favorite authors?

Ellen:  In no particular order, and all influences: Laurie Colwin, John Irving, Alice Hoffman, Sarah Addison Allen, Marisa de los Santos, Richard Russo, Anne Tyler, Stephen King….wait, wait I’m not done!



TQDescribe The Sparrow Sisters in 140 characters or less. 

Ellen:  Three beloved sisters in a seaside village find themselves at the center of a modern-day witch-hunt. Please don’t make me count that…and can I include ‘oh, crap’?



TQTell us something about The Sparrow Sisters that is not found in the book description.

Ellen:  Sorrel has wanderlust and is the only one of the three who would really like to leave, at least for a time.



TQWhat inspired you to write The Sparrow Sisters

Ellen:  First, I was living in London (I lived there for nearly twenty years) and, frankly, was homesick for New England vs Olde England! Next, I am lucky enough to have a house on Cape Cod so all around me are plants and flowers, and salt and sea and those elements are a major part of The Sparrow Sisters. Then, there really are some Sparrow Sisters living in my town (they are VERY different from my girls)! Finally, I wanted to read a book about some mysterious sisters in a slightly magical town by the ocean and since Alice Hoffman was busy, I wrote it!



TQWhat sort of research did you do for The Sparrow Sisters?

Ellen:  I am a keen gardener myself but in terms of all the knowledge Patience Sparrow has about herbs and flowers, I spent many (usually rainy) afternoons in the Chelsea Physic Garden in London. chelseaphysicgarden.co.uk. It was founded in the mid-17th century and is one of the oldest botanic gardens in Europe. Walled and quiet, secreted away only a few streets away from my house, I did a lot of damp note-taking there!



TQWho was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Ellen:  Perhaps Matty’s father was the hardest. Rob Short is already so fragile and then events simply tip him into a million, angry pieces. Making him still worth knowing and saving was hard.



TQWhich question about The Sparrow Sisters do you wish someone would ask? Ask it
and answer it!

Ellen:  Probably the hardest is “do you think herbs and plants are magical?” And yes, I do. Perhaps not quite as magical as Patience can make them but I know that when I am in my garden or when I eat the herbs and veggies I gown I am absolutely transported. I also count on some herbal remedies including Stinging Nettle, Mint and Kelp!



TQGive us one or two of your favorite non-spoilery lines from The Sparrow Sisters.

Ellen:

“They were both so frightened of losing the other that, through silence, they did.”

“Her eyes were glazed, and as Henry brushed her hair away from her face, she leaned into his hand like a cat.”

“Be quiet, you over-emotional oaf!”



TQWhat's next?

Ellen:  You know, readers have asked my about Sorrel, will her story be told? I know that I want to tell more tales about the town of Granite Point and I know there are lots of other characters that have stories to tell. So, I have been thinking about Sorrel, but I have also been thinking about some villagers we haven’t met yet. And, I have been noodling about the connection between New and Old England. Sorrel certainly deserves her own adventure!



TQThank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Ellen:  Thank you so much. Can I say Qwillery a lot?

(TQ:  Yes, please do!)





Ellen Herrick

The Sparrow Sisters
William Morrow Paperbacks, September 1, 2015
Trade Paperback and eBook, 384 pages

Interview with Ellen Herrick, author of The Sparrow Sisters
With echoes of the alchemy of Practical Magic, the lushness of Saving CeeCee Honeycutt, and the darkly joyful wickedness of the Witches of Eastwick, Ellen Herrick’s debut novel spins an enchanting love story about a place where magic whispers just beneath the surface and almost anything is possible, if you aren’t afraid to listen.

The Sparrow Sisters are as tightly woven into the seaside New England town of Granite Point as the wild sweet peas that climb the stone walls along the harbor. Sorrel, Nettie and Patience are as colorful as the beach plums on the dunes and as mysterious as the fog that rolls into town at dusk.

Patience is the town healer and when a new doctor settles into Granite Point he brings with him a mystery so compelling that Patience is drawn to love him, even as she struggles to mend him. But when Patience Sparrow’s herbs and tinctures are believed to be implicated in a local tragedy, Granite Point is consumed by a long-buried fear—and its three hundred year old history resurfaces as a modern day witch-hunt threatens. The plants and flowers, fruit trees and high hedges begin to wither and die, and the entire town begins to fail; fishermen return to the harbor empty-handed, and blight descends on the old elms that line the lanes.

It seems as if Patience and her town are lost until the women of Granite Point band together to save the Sparrow. As they gather, drawing strength from each other, will they be able to turn the tide and return life to Granite Point?

The Sparrow Sisters is a beautiful, haunting, and thoroughly mesmerizing novel that will capture your imagination.





About Ellen

Interview with Ellen Herrick, author of The Sparrow Sisters
Ellen Herrick was a publishing professional in New York City until she and her husband moved to London for a brief stint; they returned nearly twenty years later with three children (her own, it must be said). She now divides her time between Cambridge, Massachusetts, and a small town on Cape Cod very much like Granite Point.


Website

Facebook

Twitter @ellygg

Interview with Krassi Zourkova, author of Wildalone - January 17, 2015


Please welcome Krassi Zourkova to The Qwillery as part of the 2015 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. Wildalone was published by William Morrow on January 6, 2015. You may read a guest blog - Magic is a State of Mind - by Krassi here.



Interview with Krassi Zourkova, author of Wildalone - January 17, 2015




TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery. When and why did you start writing?

Krassi:  I left my first marks in books when I was one year old. I’d grab a pen and start filling the pages with sweeping circles. To indulge me, my parents bought two copies of each book: one for me to ruin, and one to keep. The sensible writing came later: I wrote my first poem at age six. I don’t exactly recall what gave me the urge, but I think it had to do with my love for rhythm and rhyme, with a desire to invent my own magical, flowing word arrangements. Around that same time, I had started piano lessons. So everything was connected—my first forays into musicality and the power of harmonious sound to move the human soul, whether with words or without.





TQ:  Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Krassi:  I’m a prankster. I plot, and then trick myself into going against plan. There’s no originality in method. And so, I invite chaos. Never take the reader where the reader wants to go. The thing is, though, the only “reader” while I write is my own mind. So I chase my psyche off track. It sounds a bit schizophrenic perhaps, but there you have it.





TQ:  What is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Krassi:  The gap between the world as I create it on the page and the reality that rarely measures up. For a few hours each day, I exist in a universe whose logic matches my value system. Everything adds up—the good, the bad. Or if it doesn’t, I twist the story and fix the equation. It’s addictive. And coming back down to earth can be quite a shock.





TQ:  Who are some of your literary influences? Favorite authors?

Krassi:  Many of them are poets: Neruda, García Lorca, Rilke. I try to write prose the way they write verse: fewer words, richer meaning. One critic accused my novel of “abstract poetics,” but I think this gives me too much credit. Most people find the book to be a page-turner, and fly through it in a few hours. I think that’s wonderful. If I’ve managed to weave action out of poetics, then I’m at peace with the muse.





TQ:  Describe Wildalone in 140 characters or less.

Krassi:  Ancient Greek rituals and Balkan witchcraft lead to murder and magic on a U.S. college campus.





TQ:  Tell us something about Wildalone that is not in the book description.

Krassi:  There’s music in it. Lots and lots of music. Piano. Guitars. Even crickets at night. Music is what gives texture to the story.



TQ:  What inspired you to write Wildalone? What appealed to you about writing a novel with supernatural elements?

Krassi:  The legend of the wildalones had been haunting me for years. I had written a poem about them, about how even such vicious creatures are susceptible to falling in love, like the rest of us. As for the supernatural elements—I love magical realism. The novels of Gabriel García Márquez. Guillermo del Toro’s film Pan’s Labyrinth. They all deal with that ineffable line beyond which the fantastical begins to seem possible.





TQ:  What sort of research did you do for Wildalone?

Krassi:  A lot of it was art history—right up my alley. I also listened to a ton of classical music, choosing for the plot pieces that I thought would have a visceral impact even on readers with no formal musical background. I read volumes of poetry, and ended up doing my own translations of all poems in the book. But where I truly went out on a limb was the flamenco subplot: not only did I go to Spain and tour Andalusia for two weeks, I also took a couple of years of flamenco lessons!





TQ:  Who was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Krassi:  The easiest character to write was the Princeton campus. And yes, it’s a character in itself. It has a past and an ever evolving present. It even has moods. Writing it wasn’t easy in the sense of choosing words and carving images out of white screen space—that part is never easy. But, this being a place instead of a person, I had the luxury of ascribing to it any emotion without having to justify or explain. It’s the exact opposite when writing human characters: each emotion or action or mood shift needs to have a clearly defined motivation.

The hardest character was the main heroine. With her, I had set myself a maddening task: to show an incredibly strong woman whose strength lies in what is often perceived as weakness. Innocence. Empathy. Patience. Self-doubt. To me, these are signs intellect and wisdom. But this assumes reading several levels below the surface. And for the reader to be able to do that, I had to write all those levels.





TQ:  Which question about your novel do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Krassi:

Question: Why write a fairy tale? Do adults really need escapism?

Answer: Because the everyday can be quite bleak as it is. Art nowadays, literature included, has a penchant for showing reality in its most gruesome, ugly, hopeless. I believe art can be more than a mirror to our grim predicament. It can—and should—give hope, capture the good in us, guide us.





TQ:  Give us one or two of your favorite non-spoilery lines from Wildalone.

Krassi:  

“Darkness doesn’t find us on its own, Theia. It is vain. It wants to be invited.”

“It was the moment I would always remember. That split second in time when, against all odds, the universe pauses to catch its breath, fate looks the other way, and you are allowed, just this once, to have what you want if only you can name it, but you must speak up or else it would become too late, and once it is too late it remains too late forever.”



TQ:  What's next?

Krassi:  Next is the sequel to Wildalone. This book was about exposing the past and waking the heroine up. Now the real rivalry between the brothers must start. There will also be new rituals, legends, magic—all the good stuff.



TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery!





Wildalone
Wildalone 1
William Morrow, January 6, 2015
Hardcover and eBook, 384 pages

Interview with Krassi Zourkova, author of Wildalone - January 17, 2015
In this enchanting and darkly imaginative debut novel full of myth, magic, romance, and mystery, a Princeton freshman is drawn into a love triangle with two enigmatic brothers, and discovers terrifying secrets about her family and herself—a bewitching blend of Twilight, The Secret History, Jane Eyre, and A Discovery of Witches.

Arriving at Princeton for her freshman year, Thea Slavin finds herself alone, a stranger in a strange land. Away from her family and her Eastern European homeland for the first time, she struggles to adapt to unfamiliar American ways and the challenges of college life—including an enigmatic young man whose brooding good looks and murky past intrigue her. Falling into a romantic entanglement with Rhys and his equally handsome and mysterious brother, Jake, soon draws Thea into a sensual mythic underworld as irresistible as it is dangerous.

In this shadow world that seems to mimic Greek mythology and the Bulgarian legends of the Samodivi or “wildalones”—forest witches who beguile and entrap men—she will discover a shocking secret that threatens everything she holds dear. And when the terrifying truth about her own family is revealed, it will transform her forever . . . if she falls under its spell.

Mesmerizing and addictive, The Wildalone is a thrilling blend of the modern and the fantastic. Krassi Zourkova creates an atmospheric world filled with rich characters as fascinating and compelling as those of Diana Gabaldon, Deborah Harkness, and Stephenie Meyer.





About Krassi

Interview with Krassi Zourkova, author of Wildalone - January 17, 2015
Krassi Zourkova grew up in Bulgaria and came to the United States to study art history at Princeton. After college, she graduated from Harvard Law School, and she has practiced finance law in New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, where she currently lives. Her poems have appeared in various literary journals. Wildalone is her first novel.

Facebook  ~  Twitter @zourkova

Guest Blog by Krassi Zourkova, author of Wildalone - December 6, 2015


Please welcome Krassi Zourkova to The Qwillery with the first 2015 Debut Author Challenge Guest Blog! Wildalone will be published by William Morrow on January 6, 2015.



Guest Blog by Krassi Zourkova, author of Wildalone - December 6, 2015




Magic Is a State of Mind

        Magic is for kids. We learn this early on, and it becomes a given, part of the price for growing up. If you’re old enough to drive, it’s time to give up fairy tales. And so, we do.
        What’s left, then, is a rational, adult existence in which duty erases dreams, logic cancels passion, and our heart is told what it should or shouldn’t want, ad nauseam. Magic—if it survives at all—gathers dust on bookshelves, labeled “literature for children” and used sparingly, as a guilty escape.
        Wildalone began for me as an extension of this escapism. I envisioned a story very much rooted in reality and in my past, but also one that would contain everything my real life didn’t: myths, legends, witch powers and sex rituals, ancient riddles, murderous secrets, and immortal creatures capable of an even more immortal love.
        But, as they say, be careful what you wish for. With every page and every plot twist, as I watched my fictional world grow complete, I also felt a certain penchant for magic lodge itself in my mind. I started to look for extraordinary potential in the everyday, to crave intricacies in life’s minutia and see each experience through a dreamy prism that earned me concerned headshakes from both family and friends.
        Technically speaking, I was writing magical realism: a tale in which the fantastical blends so smoothly with the normal, it becomes impossible to distinguish where reality ends and myth begins. Put more simply, it was a fairy tale for adults. Not the sweeping fantasy recipes I had read as a child, boasting castles and magic objects and superheroes, but a world exactly as the one we live in, except now suddenly transformed by the ability of ordinary human beings to love and dream with an intensity most of us consider to be the stuff of fairy tales.
        Over the past few weeks, as the book has reached its first readers, I have been called a hopeless romantic more than ever before. The “romantic” part I do love. But the word “hopeless” makes my skin crawl. It implies not that the romantic has given up hope, but that he or she is beyond repair. Why is the world so insistent on reforming those of us who dream? And why is romanticism viewed as a liability? Can—and should—we perhaps start speaking of the “hopeless pragmatist” instead?
        It could be that finding the magic in our adult lives means reverting back to a certain innocence we had while still children. This time, though, it needs to be a conscious choice: to believe in the unlimited possibilities of our inner world. As the saying goes—we are all granted two childhoods, but the second one depends entirely on us.





Wildalone
William Morrow, January 6, 2015
Hardcover and eBook, 384 pages

Guest Blog by Krassi Zourkova, author of Wildalone - December 6, 2015
In this enchanting and darkly imaginative debut novel full of myth, magic, romance, and mystery, a Princeton freshman is drawn into a love triangle with two enigmatic brothers, and discovers terrifying secrets about her family and herself—a bewitching blend of Twilight, The Secret History, Jane Eyre, and A Discovery of Witches.

Arriving at Princeton for her freshman year, Thea Slavin finds herself alone, a stranger in a strange land. Away from her family and her Eastern European homeland for the first time, she struggles to adapt to unfamiliar American ways and the challenges of college life—including an enigmatic young man whose brooding good looks and murky past intrigue her. Falling into a romantic entanglement with Rhys and his equally handsome and mysterious brother, Jake, soon draws Thea into a sensual mythic underworld as irresistible as it is dangerous.

In this shadow world that seems to mimic Greek mythology and the Bulgarian legends of the Samodivi or “wildalones”—forest witches who beguile and entrap men—she will discover a shocking secret that threatens everything she holds dear. And when the terrifying truth about her own family is revealed, it will transform her forever . . . if she falls under its spell.

Mesmerizing and addictive, The Wildalone is a thrilling blend of the modern and the fantastic. Krassi Zourkova creates an atmospheric world filled with rich characters as fascinating and compelling as those of Diana Gabaldon, Deborah Harkness, and Stephenie Meyer.





About Krassi

Guest Blog by Krassi Zourkova, author of Wildalone - December 6, 2015
Krassi Zourkova grew up in Bulgaria and came to the United States to study art history at Princeton. After college, she graduated from Harvard Law School, and she has practiced finance law in New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, where she currently lives. Her poems have appeared in various literary journals. Wildalone is her first novel.

Facebook  ~  Twitter @zourkova







Interview with Sarah Creech, author of Season of the Dragonflies - August 13, 2014


Please welcome Sarah Creech to The Qwillery as part of the 2014 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. Season of the Dragonflies was published on August 12th by William Morrow.



Interview with Sarah Creech, author of Season of the Dragonflies - August 13, 2014




TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery. When and why did you start writing?

Sarah:  I began writing poetry in the fourth grade and started my first novel in the sixth grade. It was titled Lisa’s Halloween. My sixth grade teacher helped me type the chapters during her lunch break. Bless her! I started writing because my mother loved reading novels so much and I wanted to impress her and make her proud. Twenty+ years later, I managed to do it. Season of the Dragonflies is dedicated to her.



TQ:  Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Sarah:  Panster. Super intuitive writer. I have a sense of the scope but I don’t know the details of the plot until I write the first draft in full. Being a plotter seems much more productive.



TQ:  What is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Sarah:  Doubting my choices. But the best part of writing is the affirmation of said choices. Our strengths are often are weaknesses, right?



TQ:  Who are some of your literary influences? Favorite authors?

Sarah:  Influences: Fitzgerald, Virginia Woolf, Colette, Tolstoy, Henry James. Favorite contemporary authors: Junot Diaz, Zadie Smith, Haruki Murakami, Alice Hoffman.



TQ:  Describe Season of the Dragonflies in 140 characters or less.

Sarah:  It’s about a family-owned perfumery, passed down by generations of women, who manufacture a perfume that guarantees the success of any woman who wears it. But the company is in trouble.



TQSeason of the Dragonflies is describe by the publisher as "... a story of flowers, sisters, practical magic, old secrets, and new love..." What is "practical magic"?

Sarah:  This phrase calls to mind Alice Hoffman’s bestselling novel. Beyond that connection, I consider practical magic to be the kind of power that’s useful, like a perfume that will guarantee extreme success in a career. A potion to make your hair change colors? Not as much.



TQ:  Tell us something about Season of the Dragonflies that is not in the book description.

Sarah:  The book has a darker side than what the description suggests. The novel explores the consequences of decisions made out of greed, anger, and impulse.



TQ:  What inspired you to write Season of the Dragonflies? Why did you set the novel in the Blue Ridge Mountains?

Sarah:  I became obsessed with the work of Birute Galdikas and her work with orangutans in Borneo. Birute traveled alone to Borneo in the South China Sea to study the most elusive of the primates. I admired her ability to pursue her work despite the isolation. Before I began writing Season of the Dragonflies, I studied as much of her work as I could find. I was most moved by her memoir titled Reflections of Eden. I’m inspired by the adventurous spirit of women like her, and Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey, to name but a few powerful female scientists. I wanted a character to go to that mysterious and beautiful place like Birute did and find self-affirmation. What my character Serena finds is the magical flower at the base of the Lenore family perfume. And that’s how my writing process began, with Serena Lenore traveling to the South China Sea at the turn of the twentieth century. From there, the novel is a story about Serena’s heirs and what they do with the power she discovered.



TQ:  What sort of research did you do for Season of the Dragonflies?

Sarah:  I studied Birute Galdikas and work by Fossey and Goodall. I also researched the life and work of Coco Chanel, especially the development of Chanel 5. I researched the history of perfume and distillation. Traveling to Paris turned out to be very informative. The Creed family of Paris is the world’s only dynastic perfume business passed down to male heirs. I studied this company and felt inspired to make an American dynasty of women.



TQ:  Who was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Sarah:  Willow was the easiest character to write, which surprised me. She is sixty-one year old with far more life experience than me. What connects us is motherhood. I’ve discovered that motherhood defies boundaries that age can sometimes create. I had a harder time writing Lucia and Mya, even though they are in their thirties, simply because they’ve had the luxury to postpone different elements of adulthood. And I did not.



TQ:  Give us one or two of your favorite non-spoilery lines from Season of the Dragonflies.

Sarah:  This one captures the sisters’ tense relationship at the beginning of the novel: “Lucia inched the smooth cotton covers down from her face just enough to see Mya had sauntered into her room completely naked except for a pair of fuzzy purple socks.”

Lucia’s yearning to go home: “She couldn’t suppress the smells of wild honeysuckle vining on fencerows and split trunks of cedar and tulip poplars and oaks ushering forth from her memory; the smell of wet leaf mulch on the forest floor and peeled peat moss along creek banks; the smells of girlhood, of her mother and her older sister and the Blue Ridge Mountains; acres upon acres of her family’s flower planted on the hills above the cabin, blanketing the town of Quartz Hollow with a smell richer than jasmine.”



TQ:  What's next?

Sarah:  I’m working on a new novel of a completely different subject matter. Here’s to hoping for magic in the writing process!



TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.





Season of the Dragonflies
William Morrow,  August 12, 2014
Hardcover and eBook, 336 pages

Interview with Sarah Creech, author of Season of the Dragonflies - August 13, 2014
As beguiling as the novels of Alice Hoffman, Adriana Trigiani, Aimee Bender, and Sarah Addison Allen, Season of the Dragonflies is a story of flowers, sisters, practical magic, old secrets, and new love, set in the Blue Ridge Mountains.

For generations, the Lenore women have manufactured a perfume unlike any other, and guarded the unique and mysterious ingredients. Their perfumery, hidden in the quiet rolling hills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, creates one special elixir that secretly sells for millions of dollars to the world’s most powerful—movie stars, politicians, artists, and CEOs. The Lenore’s signature perfume is actually the key to their success.

Willow, the coolly elegant Lenore family matriarch, is the brains behind the company. Her gorgeous, golden-haired daughter Mya is its heart. Like her foremothers, she can “read” scents and envision their power. Willow’s younger daughter, dark-haired, soulful Lucia, claims no magical touch, nor does she want any part of the family business. She left the mountains years ago to make her own way. But trouble is brewing. Willow is experiencing strange spells of forgetfulness. Mya is plotting a coup. A client is threatening blackmail. And most ominously, the unique flowers used in their perfume are dying.

Whoever can save the company will inherit it. Though Mya is the obvious choice, Lucia has begun showing signs of her own special abilities. And her return to the mountains—heralded by a swarm of blue dragonflies—may be the answer they all need.





About Sarah
Interview with Sarah Creech, author of Season of the Dragonflies - August 13, 2014
Photo by Magen Portanova
Born and raised in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, Sarah Creech grew up in a house full of women who told stories about black cloud visions and other premonitions. Her work has appeared in storySouth, Literary Mama, Aroostook Review, Glass, and Glimmer Train. She received an MFA in 2008 and now teaches English and creative writing at Queens University of Charlotte. She lives in North Carolina with her two children and her husband, a poet. This is her first novel.



Website  ~  Facebook  ~  Twitter @SarahECreech



2014 Debut Author Challenge Update - Season of the Dragonflies by Sarah Creech


2014 Debut Author Challenge Update - Season of the Dragonflies by Sarah Creech


The Qwillery is pleased to announce the newest featured author for the 2014 Debut Author Challenge.


Sarah Creech

Season of the Dragonflies
William Morrow,  August 12, 2014
Hardcover and eBook, 336 pages

2014 Debut Author Challenge Update - Season of the Dragonflies by Sarah Creech
As beguiling as the novels of Alice Hoffman, Adriana Trigiani, Aimee Bender, and Sarah Addison Allen, Season of the Dragonflies is a story of flowers, sisters, practical magic, old secrets, and new love, set in the Blue Ridge Mountains.

For generations, the Lenore women have manufactured a perfume unlike any other, and guarded the unique and mysterious ingredients. Their perfumery, hidden in the quiet rolling hills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, creates one special elixir that secretly sells for millions of dollars to the world’s most powerful—movie stars, politicians, artists, and CEOs. The Lenore’s signature perfume is actually the key to their success.

Willow, the coolly elegant Lenore family matriarch, is the brains behind the company. Her gorgeous, golden-haired daughter Mya is its heart. Like her foremothers, she can “read” scents and envision their power. Willow’s younger daughter, dark-haired, soulful Lucia, claims no magical touch, nor does she want any part of the family business. She left the mountains years ago to make her own way. But trouble is brewing. Willow is experiencing strange spells of forgetfulness. Mya is plotting a coup. A client is threatening blackmail. And most ominously, the unique flowers used in their perfume are dying.

Whoever can save the company will inherit it. Though Mya is the obvious choice, Lucia has begun showing signs of her own special abilities. And her return to the mountains—heralded by a swarm of blue dragonflies—may be the answer they all need.


Interview with Ellen Herrick, author of The Sparrow SistersInterview with Krassi Zourkova, author of Wildalone - January 17, 2015Guest Blog by Krassi Zourkova, author of Wildalone - December 6, 2015Interview with Sarah Creech, author of Season of the Dragonflies - August 13, 20142014 Debut Author Challenge Update - Season of the Dragonflies by Sarah Creech

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