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THE WATCHISMO TIMES WATCH BLOG A reliquary of obscure timepieces from bygone eras as well as the cutting-edge watch designs of today.

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Out of this World! The Richard Mille Planetarium Tellurium

Out of this World! The Richard Mille Planetarium TelluriumI'm proud to be one of the first to unveil the Richard Mille Planetarium Tellurium. A massive achievement in horology with an entirely new mechanical interpretation of a centuries old tradition - Depicting the universe as clockwork. Created by the revolutionary independent watch brand, Richard Mille (with obvious watch case design) and developed by mastermind Stephen Forsey and Robert Greubel of CompliTime and an exclusive look into his original drawings for the Planetary Tellurium below the photos...

Out of this World! The Richard Mille Planetarium Tellurium
Text by Theodore Diehl for Richard Mille (For the complete story, visit Horomundi-->LINK)

"Despite its enormous complexity, the Richard Mille Planetarium- Tellurium is designed to be: - easy to understand - easy and practical in use - precise and reliable This means that for the first time, an object of this type will be able to be operated by someone who is not a specialist.

UNDERSTANDABLE VISUAL REPRESENTATION

First of all, the diameter of the earth has for practical and aesthetic reasons been notably enlarged in the Planetarium-Tellurium (in reality, the earth is 109 times smaller than the sun) allowing a good view of the continents and indeed of countries. All the planets can be seen perfectly, although these, as explained above, are not to scale regarding size and distance. The indications (date, equation of time, zodiac) are represented in an easily readable and consistent way, and on a separate area from the layout depicting the rotation of the planets.

Out of this World! The Richard Mille Planetarium TelluriumIndications, front panel

REPRESENTATIONS AND INDICATIONS

Astronomic representations (R) and indications (I)
  1. - Rotation of the earth on its axis (R)
  2. - Rotation of the earth around the sun (R)
  3. - Obliquity of the earth (R)
  4. - Rotation of the moon on its axis (R)
  5. - Rotation of the moon around the earth (R)
  6. - Phases of the moon (I)
  7. - Equation of time (I)
  8. - Mercury (R)
  9. - Venus (R)
  10. - Sun (R)
  • Rotation of the earth on its axis (R) One rotation on its axis in 24 hours. Error: +1° in 7.7 years
  • Rotation of the earth around the sun (R) One rotation in 1 year. Error: -1° in 2 million years. This rotation is used as the basis for indicating the seasons, the equinoxes, solstices and zodiac signs, represented in their respective windows.
  • Obliquity of the earth (R) Exact rotation, the tilt of the earth’s axis between the two poles: 23.5°. This tilt towards the sun provides a perfect understanding of the phenomenon of the seasons.
  • Rotation of the moon on its axis and rotation of the moon around the earth (R) The calculation of the rotation is based on a synodic month of 29.53058912 days (time interval between two new moons). Error : +1° in 168 years.
  • Phases of the moon (I) The phases of the moon are represented on the moon itself with a surrounding ring that represents the area visible from the earth.
  • Equation of time (I) The equation of time is represented by a hand and a dial divided into sectors on the front part of the planetarium. The hand represents in + or – the minutes that must be added or subtracted from the mean time in order to obtain the true solar time.
  • Solar time. Associated with the equation of time, it represents the true time in relation to the sun. This indication is connected to the planetary mechanism and is on the dial.
  • Mercury (R) Representation of Mercury performing a rotation around the sun in 87.9 days. Mercury does not rotate around its axis.
  • Venus (R) Representation of Venus performing a rotation around the sun in 224.7 days. Venus does not rotate around its axis.
  • Sun (R) Static representation of the sun in the centre of the Planetarium Tellurium.
  • Time indications - Hour - Minute - Time zones - Date (Perpetual calendar) - Day (Perpetual calendar) - Month (Perpetual calendar) - Year, decade (Perpetual calendar) - Leap year - Power reserve - Seasons, equinoxes, solstices, Zodiac signs
MATERIALS USED Titanium, steel, brass, gold, silver, red corundum

Another unique aspect of the Richard Mille Planetarium-Tellurium is the addition of a perpetual calendar to the astronomic representations in combination with a détente chronometer escapement. The addition of a highly accurate going train and winding barrel of the planetarium to this escapement make this the most accurate clockwork Planetarium Tellurium of its kind.

The clock will be unveiled at the September 2007 Tempus - Temple of Time in Singapore.

A one of a kind creation, the price? Well into seven figures.

More information at Horomundi here-->Link
Richard Mille website-->Link

Out of this World! The Richard Mille Planetarium TelluriumView of the interior without the Sun in position.
Titanium bridges/plates


Out of this World! The Richard Mille Planetarium TelluriumPlanetarium Terrurium Drawings
by Stephen Forsey of (Greubel Forsey)

Out of this World! The Richard Mille Planetarium Tellurium
Out of this World! The Richard Mille Planetarium TelluriumThe latest Richard Mille RM011 Chronograph
Photos by Mike Disher of TimeZone

Highlights of other Planetary devices, clocks and watches include the 18th century Planetarium clock below by Jean-Andre Lepaute of France.

Out of this World! The Richard Mille Planetarium TelluriumTable Clock with Planetarium circa 1770
Collection of the Beyer Museum

Out of this World! The Richard Mille Planetarium TelluriumOur solar system has even been reduced to a mechanical wristwatch with this recent Christiaan van der Klaauw "Planetarium." Previously featured here-->Link

Other phenomenal wrist galaxies like the 1985 Ulysse Nardin's Planetarium Copernicus and more recent, the Trilogy Set including the Astrolabe.

Boy, if I didn't feel small in this Universe, I sure do now!


Lastly, learn about the very first mechanical astronomical device nearly 2000 years old, the ancient Greek Antikythera Celestial Calculator-->Link

Related Posts;
Other Astronomical Timepieces-->Link
All Clock Posts-->Link
Complication Timepieces-->Link
Richard Mille-->Link
$2,000,000 Hatching Astronomic Clock by Vacheron Constantin --> Link


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DIY Clock Design Competition at FurniCreations

DIY Clock Design Competition at FurniCreations
Here's a DIY clock design competition from FurniCreations.com. You must buy an LED clock kit from their website directly ($24) or you can print out their cut-out version for free.

I asked Mike Giles, owner of the Montreal based FurniCreations, for additional information in regards to the decision making process and what the winner can expect to receive; "On January 1st, 2008 (the competition deadline) we will be adding a voting system to the "show us your skills" gallery which will allow the general public to select their favorite design, once it is selected, the design will be added to our Spring lineup, crediting the designer and they will receive 50% of the profit on each piece that is sold of their design."

Here's an example of their clocks and how they're made-->Link
Furnicreations.com-->Link


Related Posts;
Vintu Tilt
Klok Nixie Tube Clock
Vacheron Constantin Astronomic Clock
Seth Thomas Sethosphere
A Clockwork Orange
Aurora Clocks
Talking Voxclock
History of Car Clocks
Clockmaster of NYC
Panasonic See Thru Clock

Wooden LED Clocks
Jumbo LED Clocks


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Clockwiser - Vinta Tilt & Homemade Kinetic Clocks

Japanese design company Vinta has created a wooden table clock that measures the time by rotating on its perfectly round bottom, tilting to one of two models that rotate once every hour or every minute.

Their description;
"We wanted to express the idea of "feeling the time", not "measuring the time". It can be shown from revolving slowly on its own axis once every hour with an ambiguous change in its inclination. And we used the preciseness of a Japanese craftman technique to make this delicate shape to revolve smoothly."

Product Link
Video Link

via Make




The website Instructables offers this step by step guide to making a cool kinetic op-art wall clock-->Link




Source via Make

Related Posts;
Klok Nixie Tube Clock
Vacheron Constantin Astronomic Clock
Seth Thomas Sethosphere
A Clockwork Orange
Aurora Clocks
Talking Voxclock
History of Car Clocks
Clockmaster of NYC
Panasonic See Thru Clock


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Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History

Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History
"Travelers have benefited from any number of portable timepieces over the years. During the 19th century, as more and more people began to travel by carriage, they needed timepieces that could travel with them. One such timepiece was the carriage clock, whose remarkably shockproof movement was perfected by the French watchmaker Abraham Louis Brequet in the late 18th century. In other instances, pocket watches were placed in leather holders that fit over the front board of the carriage. As inventors and manufacturers like Karl Benz, Gottlieb Daimler, Charles and J. Frank Duryea, Henry Ford, and Ransom E. Olds furthered development of the automobile, a new breed of clock was introduced—the car clock.

By 1908, speedometer companies were producing and marketing clocks as after-market accessories. Over the next decade, the car clock grew in popularity and several companies began catering to the growing market, including the Phinney-Walker Keyless Clock Company, the Warner Instrument Company, the Seth Thomas Clock Company, the Stewart Speedometer Company, the Chelsea Clock Company, and the Boston Clock Company. In some cases, there was a clear crossover between marine clocks and automobile clocks. Waltham, a major supplier of car clocks, marketed identical timepieces for both automobiles and boats.

Manufactures gave customers many choices offering models that mounted on general interior surfaces, dashboards, steering wheels, gearshifts, and rear-view mirrors. The winding mechanisms also evolved from key-wind clocks to stem-wind clocks to rim-wind clocks. During the 1930s and 1940s, electric automobile clocks were in production, but mechanical clocks were still being offered. It was not until 1950s and 1960s that electric clocks truly dominated the market, at least up until the advent of quartz technology. Today's car clocks mostly have quartz movements, however new technologies like Global Positioning Systems (GPS) are available as both production and after-market accessories."

From the NAWCC Museum


Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History1822 Carriage Clock by Breguet

Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History1905 Leather Dashboard Clock Holder

In the early days of the "horseless carriage", automobiles were open vehicles with a dash or kick board in front of the driver's legs. The first car clocks were often large timepieces in heavy leather holders which were slung over the dashboard.

Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History1911 Heuer "Time of Trip"

The "Time of Trip", the first dashboard chronograph patented by (TAG) Heuer in 1911, was designed for aircraft and automobiles. Its 11-cm diameter and its size are well suited for installation on all types of dashboards. The large hands at the centre of the dial indicate the time. The small pair of hands, at the 12 o'clock position, give the duration of the trip (not exceeding 12 hours). The same button is used to start, stop and reset the clock. A small window at the 3 o'clock position serves to monitor the proper operation of the device.

Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History1912 Brown Clock-Speedometer

Speedometers were available as standard equipment in vehicles as early as 1908, though most drivers could not afford this luxury. Often speedometers were combined with odometers, trip meters and clocks.

Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History1925 Phinney-Walker Rim-Wind Car Clock

The "Embassy" was one of the most popular car clocks produced by Phinney-Walker. The eight day clock was wound and set by rotating the outer rim.

Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History1925 Limosine Clock

This car clock was made by Waltham for use in Cadillac limousines. The clock would have been mounted on the partition which separated the driver from the passenger compartment.


Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History1929 Waltham 8 Day
Dial color matching car color

Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History1932 Jaeger

Along with Sterling Electric, Jaeger was a major manufacturer of 1930s car clocks. Their clocks could be seen in Cadillacs, Packards and Lincolns in the thirties. This clock was made for the Packard Super 8.

Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History1933 Heuer Autavia Dashboard Timer

In 1933, Heuer introduced the "Autavia", a dashboard timer used for Automobiles and Aviation (and thus the name "Autavia"). The companion "Hervue" was a clock that had an 8-day movement (meaning that it could run for eight days without being wound).

Heuer Collection at On The Dash

Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History1941 Packard "Woody" 110 Station Sedan Dashboard Clock

Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History"The Woody"

Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History1950s Ford

Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History1951 Ford

Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History1952 Pontiac Chieftain Deluxe Station Wagon

One of the most spectacular car clocks I've seen. The clock is by far the largest feature in the entire dashboard.

Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock HistoryChieftain Station Wagon

Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History1955 Ford

Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History1956 Oldsmobile
clock above, car below

Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History
Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History1960 Oldsmobile
clock above, car below

Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History
Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History1965 Dodge Dart

Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History1970s Cadillac

And of course, digital displays started to appear in the seventies. This one from a Cadillac featuring rolling drums of numbers like most alarm clocks of that era.

Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock History2006 Peugeot 908 RC concept car
by Bell & Ross

Watch brand, Bell & Ross was picked to appoint the dashboard clock in this concept car. Featuring a jumping digital hour and central minutes hand based upon their timepiece of similar design.

Time On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock HistoryWatch brand, IWC with their clock
in a Mercedes S63 AMG

And if you have any unique dashboard clocks you'd like to share for a future follow-up to this posting, please email me.

Related Posts;
Radiator Grille Watches
Delorean Time DMC2 Wristwatch
Audemars Piguet Maserati Millenary MC12
Kienzle Life 2002 Jump Hour
Azimuth Chrono Gauge Mecha
Paul Smith Dashboard Watch
Heuer Silverstone
Heuer Ford Chronosplit
Tag Heuer Monaco V4 Belt Drive Watch
Formex Shock Absorber Watch
Gerald Genta Arena Chrono Quattro Retro
Parmigiani Bugatti Engine Block Watch
Manometro
Dunhill Petrolhead
Richard Arbib
B.R.M. Birotor
Driver Watches



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The Clockmaster of New York City

The Clockmaster of New York City
"New Yorkers look to the time the way farmers look to the weather. Many have their own idiosyncratic maps of public street clocks they rely on, scurrying to work or late for appointments, but few would imagine that so many of those clocks run thanks to a man named Marvin Schneider."

New York Times Article-->Link

The Clockmaster of New York CityAudio Slide Show-->Link


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Hatching Astronomic Sphere Clock by Vacheron Constantin

Hatching Astronomic Sphere Clock by Vacheron Constantin'L’Esprit des Cabinotiers' - The one-of-a-kind mystery clock that literally emerges from a hatching sphere - Created for the 250th anniversary of Vacheron Constantin.

The incubating clockwork consists of a golden sphere engraved by hand according to the sky chart drawn by Robert de Vaugondy (1723-1786), cartographer and geographer to Louis XV and creator of two large globes, one celestial and the other terrestrial. The sphere is composed of eight mechanical petals symbolizing the lotus flower, which may be progressively opened by means of an extremely sophisticated spring mechanism. The keys to the mystery and its revelation are known exclusively to the one owner of the object. The automata flower delicately reveals its heart, a timepiece endowed with a wide range of functions and complications (detailed below photos). Sold at auction for nearly $2,000,000.


Hatching Astronomic Sphere Clock by Vacheron Constantin
Hatching Astronomic Sphere Clock by Vacheron Constantin
Hatching Astronomic Sphere Clock by Vacheron Constantin
Hatching Astronomic Sphere Clock by Vacheron Constantin
Hatching Astronomic Sphere Clock by Vacheron Constantin
Hatching Astronomic Sphere Clock by Vacheron Constantin
Hatching Astronomic Sphere Clock by Vacheron Constantin
Hatching Astronomic Sphere Clock by Vacheron Constantin
Hatching Astronomic Sphere Clock by Vacheron Constantin

Technical specifications

GLOBE

Materials: 18-carat 750 pink gold (5N)
Diameter: 220 mm
Form and construction: Globe divided into a fixed half-sphere and 8 petals opening by means of 16 connecting rods linked to the telescopic shaft (on tiny sapphire balls) carrying the timepiece, driven by the mechanical motor housed within the base.
Finishing: The outside of the globe is in natural polished gold and features a depiction of the position of the stars on September 17th 1755 (date of the first document mentioning the existence of the House of Vacheron), decorated with a hand engraving inspired by the work of Robert de Vaugondy. The inside, enhanced by slender polished gold ribs, is finely satin-brushed.

CLOCK

Materials: 18-carat 750 pink gold (5N), Corundum
Diameter and thickness: 145 mm, 70 mm
Shape and construction: A cylinder and 2 sapphire crystal domes connected by a frame in 5N pink gold. An openworked support links the clock to the telescopic shaft at the centre of the sphere. Two holes for winding and time-setting are drilled into the rear dome.
Glasses: Sapphire crystal, glareproofed on both faces.

DIALS

Dial material: 18-carat yellow gold
Material for appliques: 18-carat pink gold (5N)
Dial description: Silvered with special 250th anniversary hand-guilloch? motif, minute disc encircling the dial in silvered 18-carat gold with engraved indications. ?Grand feu? miniature enamelled 12-segment outer disc.

Hatching Astronomic Sphere Clock by Vacheron Constantin

MOVEMENT

Indications & functions :
1. Hour on 12-hour display
2. Minutes
3. Deadbeat seconds
4. Hour on 24-hour display
5. Power reserve
6. Name of the day
7. Date of the day (perpetual)
8. Name of the month
9. Number of the year within the leap-year cycle
10. Equation of time
11. Age of the moon
12. Phases of the moon
13. Temperature
14. Astronomical calendar giving the position of the sun according to the Gregorian calendar. This mechanism was built on the basis of calculations by the mathematician Charles Etienne Louis CAMUS (1699-1768) and the watchmaking mechanical engineer Antide JANVIER (1751-1835).
15. Hours and quarters striking automatically in passing and on request, with the possibility of preventing the automatic striking.

Other technical characteristics:

Energy: Mechanical, twin-barrel, manual key winding
Regulating organs: Mono-metallic balance. Isochronous balance-spring ending in a Phillips curve, micrometric index (patented by Vacheron Constantin in 1884), Straight-line lever escapement with constant force system applied each second to the escape-wheel. This system precisely measures out the energy required for the regulator to perform 5 vibrations of an ideal and invariable amplitude.
Frequency: 18,000 vibrations per hour
Power reserve: Over seven days

Main dimensions:
Caging diameter: 125 mm
Total diameter: 129 mm
Total thickness: 41 mm


via The Purists --> Link
Quarter Millennieum of Vacheron Constantin auction --> Link

Related posts;
Christiaan van der Klauuw Astronomical Watches --> Link
Sethosphere Globe Clock --> Link


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Solid Wood 1900 Pocket Watch - Wood Gears, Hands and Case

Solid Wood 1900 Pocket Watch - Wood Gears, Hands and CaseTake a break from the complicated world of mechanical innovation for a few seconds... The orgy of Tourbillons, Forged Carbon, and Silicium Components can fade for a moment while you appreciate this early 1900 Russian pocket watch entirely made of wood. The case, the hands, and the gears, all from a tree - a living material that also marks time with it's rings - natures own clock and a profound medium for a watch.

Solid Wood 1900 Pocket Watch - Wood Gears, Hands and Case
via Casalonga Odd Watches --> Link
(The site is sadly out of date but nevertheless features some fun
nontraditional watch displays)

UPDATE! The history of the wood-watchmakers from Russia who also carved watchworks from bone-->Link

Solid Wood 1900 Pocket Watch - Wood Gears, Hands and Case1865 'Bone Watch' Article-->here


Other wood related features;
Hamilton Electric Wood Prototype --> Link
Swank Woody --> Link


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1970s Panasonic See-thru Clock Radio


The first of a few features about transparent mystery dial timepieces, both wristwatch and clock oriented. I recently bought this oddball vintage Panasonic (model #RC-6500C) clock-radio on Ebay and was just blown away with it's design -- Appearing to be floating in space, the hour, minutes, seconds and alarm are split into four layered clear disks spinning in a porthole for both clock and radio. Each disk is a gear in itself with the contacts of the outer teeth & notches hidden by the case. The concept has also been miniaturized for some spectacular watches, stay tuned...

See my short video below showing off the clock's transparency. Once I find someone to repair the lamp feature, the displays will again glow blue for night viewing.







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Out of this World! The Richard Mille Planetarium TelluriumDIY Clock Design Competition at FurniCreationsClockwiser - Vinta Tilt & Homemade Kinetic ClocksTime On The Road - A Dash of Dashboard Clock HistoryThe Clockmaster of New York CityHatching Astronomic Sphere Clock by Vacheron ConstantinSolid Wood 1900 Pocket Watch - Wood Gears, Hands and Case1970s Panasonic See-thru Clock Radio

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