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THE WATCHISMO TIMES WATCH BLOG A reliquary of obscure timepieces from bygone eras as well as the cutting-edge watch designs of today.

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Mr. Jones New Watch Releases - Always On My Mind & On Foot Watches

Mr. Jones New Watch Releases - Always On My Mind & On Foot WatchesHow does one follow up the hugely successful "The Accurate" (Remember You Will Die) watch? Well, the concept designer Mr. Jones of London has done it with the brand new "Always On My Mind" Watch. No longer being reminded of your mortality, but instead, constantly think of your immortal beloved every time you check the time. (Sugar cubes for extra sweetness not included)

Mr. Jones says, "This is a watch for the Romantic - the hour and minute hands for the phrase always on my mind. The watch gives a frisson of pleasure every time it is consulted and the wearer is reminded of that special person."

They are a limited edition series of only 100 models and each watch is individually numbered on the caseback.

Mr. Jones New Watch Releases - Always On My Mind & On Foot Watches
Mr. Jones New Watch Releases - Always On My Mind & On Foot WatchesAlso just introduced (We're the first in the world at The Watchismo Times!) is the limited edition Mr. Jones "On Foot", the follow up to the highly conceptual "The Average Day watch".

On Foot displays the world record times for running different distances. Three arcs map the records to the hours, minutes and seconds on the watch. The outer arc shows records of less than 60 seconds: 100m, 200m and 400m; the sweep of the second hand corresponds with the span of each record. The two inner arcs align with the minute and hour hand respectively, for records of under and over one hour.

Mr. Jones New Watch Releases - Always On My Mind & On Foot Watches
Mr. Jones New Watch Releases - Always On My Mind & On Foot WatchesAh, don't forget the now classic The Accurate. Be inspired by it, live your life like every second counts!

Mr. Jones Watches Product Page


Related Posts;
All Mr. Jones Stories at The Watchismo Times


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The Alessi Daytimer - Architect Will Alsop Introduces his Geometric LED Watch Collection



The Daytimer, a geometric digital time sculpture - brand new from the iconic Italian design brand Alessi and designed by renowned architect Will Alsop + Federico Grazzini, this watch features a high-contrast blue OLED digital display, framed by a bold geometric polyurethane case.

"Daytimer is formed of Alsop's vision of objects in the world. We see it present in the landscape; it has landed in the universe of objects, naturally, effortlessly.

It has a smart, adaptable, docile form, which encases its technological core while at the same time it is ironic and natural. Although apparently clumsy, it wraps complacently round the wearer's wrist, presenting the owner with its 3D display; the OLED screen conveniently turning towards its owner and wanting to play.

Daytimer wants to be owned by its wearer, although inevitably it will attract the attention of others. It polygonises a human wrist. It loves humans and wants to be close to them. Or part of them.


Alessi Daytimer features bright pop colors from purple, green, orange to a very stark black






And below, some examples of his extraordinary architecture;







Will Alsop Interview-->Video LINK


Alessi Daytimer Product Page Link


Related stories on The Watchismo Times;
All Digital Watch/Clock Posts


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Mile Projects of Japan - Rays of Light "Good Afternoon Clock"

Mile Projects of Japan - Rays of Light From the Japan Design team Mile Projects comes this simple concept clock with rays of light for hands. The beams shine from thin holes in the inner bezel and appear to light the negative space dial (whatever the ring is hanging from).
Mile Projects of Japan - Rays of Light
Mile Projects from Japan via The Design Blog


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Cinco De Nooka - Five New Models from NOOKA! String Theory, Sky Pyramid, Hyper Space & UNDRCRWN


Nooka announces the release of a brand new collection of graphically inspired watches for Summer 2009. The four new additions to the Nooka line of timepieces feature bold geometric designs inspired by the simplistic shape of a triangle.

Cinco De Nooka - Five New Models from NOOKA! String Theory, Sky Pyramid, Hyper Space & UNDRCRWNThis new series of designs inspired by higher dimensional physics and our utopian optimism that the planet will once again embrace space as a necessary next frontier! They were designed in-house by futuretron infinity of dinosaur island. Above is the brand new Sky Pyramid ZenH model

Designer Matthew Waldman's personal touch was the decision to have the pattern in the models overprint the whole face.

Cinco De Nooka - Five New Models from NOOKA! String Theory, Sky Pyramid, Hyper Space & UNDRCRWNThis Black "String Theory" model consist of a light-weight aluminum case and soft, polyurethane band.

This new series of designs inspired by higher dimensional physics and our utopian optimism that the planet will once again embrace space as a necessary next frontier! Designer Matthew Waldman's personal touch was the decision to have the pattern in the models overprint the whole face.


They also come in snazzy custom packaging! the only word that comes to mind is "dope".


Cinco De Nooka - Five New Models from NOOKA! String Theory, Sky Pyramid, Hyper Space & UNDRCRWNWhite String Theory

Cinco De Nooka - Five New Models from NOOKA! String Theory, Sky Pyramid, Hyper Space & UNDRCRWNHyper Space

Cinco De Nooka - Five New Models from NOOKA! String Theory, Sky Pyramid, Hyper Space & UNDRCRWNNooka and UNDRCRWN have come together to create a fun and colorful collaboration. The watch features a striped polyurethane band with a black ZenV display. Only 200 will be produced!

The basketball and Hip-Hop-centric brand known as UNDRCRWN team up with Nooka on an upcoming watch release. The colorful striped design features a multi-colored polyurethane band designed by founder Dustin Canalin.


See the entire Noo Nooka Watch Collection Here


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Time in Six Parts - Che-Wei Wang's 3.16 Billion Cycles, In a Lifetime, Cinematic Timepiece, One Hour Sprocket, Thermal Clock and Counting to a Billion

Time in Six Parts

Time in Six Parts is a series of attempts to unravel and re-present time through alternative perspectives. The hope is to demystify scales of time that are out of our immediate reach and explore new approaches to marking time.

Six timekeeping devices were built as part of Che-Wei Wang's thesis project at the Interactive Telecommunications Program at TISCH, NYU.

3.16 Billion Cycles video

3.16 Billion Cycles is a clock that unravels a century through a series of pulleys.

3.16 BILLION CYCLES CLOCK

Can we watch decay? Can we see glass as a fluid slowly slumping and deforming over time?

Everything is in constant flux, yet we consider many things around us static and fixed. 3.16 Billion Cycles is an attempt to unravel a seemingly unchanging 100 years into a set of relationships in digestible increments.


A 60 rpm (revolutions per minute) motor drives the entire mechanism. It rotates once every second. The following pulley rotates once every 5 seconds (1:5 ratio). The next rotates once every 60 seconds or 1 minute. Then 5 minutes, 1 hour, 1 day, 1 month, 1 year, and 1 decade. The decade wheel carries the load of the large arc. The large arc rotates once every century. The final ratio between the 60 rpm motor and the large arc is approximately 1:31.6 billion.

Each wheel is marked with a black nut to highlight a position that could be tracked over time. Along the arc, 100 lines mark the divisions of each passing year. When the clock finally reaches the end of a 100 year cycle, the arc falls off its track onto the floor.


ONE HOUR SPROCKET CLOCK

How accurate does a clock need to be? Most household clocks display time with 3 mechanical movements; the hour, on a 12 hour cycle; minutes past the hour; and seconds past the minute. How crucial is it for us to know how many seconds are past the minute? Do we need to know the exact number of minutes past the hour?

One Hour Sprocket is a wall-mounted 12 hour clock with a 60 tooth sprocket attached to a motor, completing one revolution every hour. From the sprocket hangs a chain that consists of 720 links. Each link accounts for every minute of a 12 hour cycle. Among the black chain links is one polished stainless steel link to identify the position of the hour past 12 o’clock. To tell time one can estimate the position of the “hour hand” or count the number of links from the polished link to the top of the clock for a more accurate reading.

Between two 1/4” steel plates, sits a stepper motor, which ticks every 18 seconds. The hanging chain juggles with each tick reassuring the clock’s functionality.

Sprocket Clock





Thermal Clock video

THERMAL CLOCK

We rely heavily on our vision to identify change. We see sand accumulating at the bottom of the hourglass. We see the minute hand rotate clockwise. How would our sense of time change if we cast time to another sense?

Thermal Clock is a timepiece that positions heat along a bar over a 24 hour cycle to tell time.

Using an array of peltier junctions, heat is emitted from a focused area moving from left to right along the bar over the course of a day.

Thermal Clock




Counting to a Billion video

COUNTING TO A BILLION

As a child, I remember challenging myself to count to 1000, 1 million, or 1 billion. I don’t think I ever made it.
Why do we aimlessly count? How long would it take to count to a billion?

Counting to a Billion is a device created to fulfill the desire to count. The electronics consists of a microcontroller, a speech module, and a speaker powered by a rechargeable battery. There is no/off switch. The voice begins counting at one, two, three and continues counting up until it reaches one billion at which point in time it will stop.

Counting to a Billion Clock

If it took a second to utter each string of numbers, it would take 1 billion seconds or 31.7 years for the device to reach its end. But since it takes more than a second to vocalize many of the numbers in the sequence, it may take upwards of 60 years to complete.

The unit is housed in a solid block of aluminum, cnc milled into a vessel that was designed to withstand substantial abuse over many years.


Cinematic Timepiece video

CINEMATIC TIMEPIECE

Time is our measure of a constant beat. We use seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks, months, years, decades, centuries, etc. But what if we measured time against rituals, chores, tasks, stories, and narratives? How can we use our memory, prediction, familiar and unfamiliar narratives to tell time?

As a child, I remember using the length of songs as a way to measure how much time was left during a trip. A song was an appropriate period to easily multiply to get a grasp of any larger measure like the time left until we arrived to our grandmother’s place. The length of a song was also a measure I could digest and understand in an instant.

The first iteration of Cinematic Timepiece consists of 5 video loops playing at 5 different speeds on a single screen. The video is of a person coloring in a large circle on a wall.

The frame furthest to the right is a video loop that completes a cycle in one minute. The video to the left of the minute loop completes its cycle in one hour. The next completes in a day, then a month, then a year.

Through various iterations, we intend to experiment with various narratives and rituals captured in a video loop to be read as measures of time.

The software was written in OpenFrameworks for a single screen to be expanded in the future for multiple screens as a piece of hardware.

IN A LIFETIME

click image to view "In A Lifetime"

We often compare ourselves to friends, colleagues, relatives, idols, etc. on a scale of time that’s beyond our comprehension. Full of hope and objectives that are far into the future, we strive to achieve as much as our parents, friends, and heroes.
What do you plan to achieve in the next 5 years? 10 years? 20? How long will you live?

Though there are many unknowns, we share one lifetime as a common measure.

In a Lifetime is a website that visualizes individual achievements and milestones along the scale of one lifetime. Each point along the arc represents a milestone where the top (12th hour) is their moment of birth, the right quadrant (3rd hour) is a quarter through their life, the bottom (6th hour) is half way through their life, and so on. The mapping strips age as a parameter from individuals and scales lifespans to compare achievements of one life with another.

The website collects information about each individual through a publicly accessible interface. Input parameters are, author, date of birth, lifespan, milestone or note, and significance (0-100). Anyone who visits the site can enter information about an individual to be mapped. If one so desires, you can enter your predicted lifespan to compare personal milestones to others.

Some patterns emerge. Significant achievements are made between the half way point and the 3/4 point of their lives. Beyond the 3/4 point, nearly all individuals stop accruing achievements .
Around the half way point in their individual lives, Albert Einstein wrote the General Theory of Relativity, Constantin Brancusi completed the Kiss, Le Corbusier completed Villa Savoye, Leonardo Da Vinci drew the proportions of human figure after Vitruvious.

Visit Che-Wei Wang's website

Related Posts on The Watchismo Times;
All Alternative Display Features


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Digimech (Digital Mechanical) Clock by Designer Duncan Shotton





Young British designer Duncan Shotten has created this inventive mechanical digital prototype clock. For those of you that appreciate Harry Winston Opus 9 reinterpretation of a digital watch as a mechanical timepiece, then you gotta dig this kid's clock.

Numbers are printed on vertical sliders and only reveal themselves when shifted into perfect alignment with the 'display box'. when not aligned they look like random, alien forms and represent the negative of the number that is required.

The sliders are gradually cranked up using motors coupled to intricate mechanics in accurate time. upon reaching the last number (e.g. the 9th minute) the same motor disengages the ratchet’s 'stopper' and the slider then falls to the first number again.’


To see it in action, view the video above.



Duncan Shott Website

via Dark Roasted Blend

Related posts at The Watchismo Times;
Opus 9 Mechanical Digital Watch

All Watchismo Times Clock Posts

History of LED Calculator Watches
History of Dynamic Scattering LCD
History of Solar LED Watches
LED-LCD Watch Combos
Zenith Analog/Digital Hybrid
Other Analog-Digital Posts
Alternative Displays
All Digital Watch Posts
All LED Watch Related Posts


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Denis Guidone Concept Timepieces - Ora Unica Scribble Watch Ora il Legale Daylight Savings Tilt clock & Other Prototype Designs

Denis Guidone Concept Timepieces - Ora Unica Scribble Watch Ora il Legale Daylight Savings Tilt clock & Other Prototype Designsvia Yanko Design;


Save yourself from the arduous task of setting time forwards or backwards at daylight savings with the concept clock "Ora ilLegale" designed by Denis Guidone.

It will eventually be produced by NAVA, and will be displayed at the upcoming Milan Design Week. The designer, Denis Guidone, has had one other concept posted on Yanko, a clock too, how about that!


Denis Guidone Concept Timepieces - Ora Unica Scribble Watch Ora il Legale Daylight Savings Tilt clock & Other Prototype Designs
Denis Guidone Concept Timepieces - Ora Unica Scribble Watch Ora il Legale Daylight Savings Tilt clock & Other Prototype Designs
Denis Guidone Concept Timepieces - Ora Unica Scribble Watch Ora il Legale Daylight Savings Tilt clock & Other Prototype Designs"Denis Guidone was just selected as the winner of the international design competition Adamo Eva. His whimsical scribble watch design called “Ora Unica”, meaning One Hour, is a wonderful contrast of chaos and order mixed together. In their words, “The hour and minute hands are represented by a single line drawn on two circular faces, which turn one inside the other. Both faces together resemble a graphical gesture, a doodle that changes as time passes.”

Denis Guidone Concept Timepieces - Ora Unica Scribble Watch Ora il Legale Daylight Savings Tilt clock & Other Prototype Designs
Below, some new minimalist watch designs by Denis Guidone

Denis Guidone Concept Timepieces - Ora Unica Scribble Watch Ora il Legale Daylight Savings Tilt clock & Other Prototype Designs
Denis Guidone Concept Timepieces - Ora Unica Scribble Watch Ora il Legale Daylight Savings Tilt clock & Other Prototype Designs
Denis Guidone Concept Timepieces - Ora Unica Scribble Watch Ora il Legale Daylight Savings Tilt clock & Other Prototype Designs
via Yanko Design & Technabob

Denis Guidone Website


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Ikepod Solaris Collection by Marc Newson + Interview

Solaris by Ikepod & Marc Newson

Showcasing a new dimension from his Ikepod brand, Australian designer Marc Newson introduces the Solaris. Having designed watches since 1986, the expert watchmaker takes a unique approach with his latest creation. Named after an Andrei Tarkovsky film, the Solaris features a duality factor rarely seen on timepieces. Following the concept of an symmetrical two-faced object, this new Ikepod watch combines sleek hand crafted design with two fully reversible faces and German metal-mesh bracelets. Another neat feature is the ability to display two different time zones recto-verso with each face comprised of separate independent movements.

via Hypebeast

“With the Solaris, however, I wanted to design a very simple, elegant dress watch” - Marc Newson

Ikepod Solaris Collection by Marc Newson + Interview


Interview via The Watch Quote & Louise Neri


Louise Neri: When did you make your first watch?

Marc Newson: At the age of twelve, in my grandfather’s garage in Sydney. I found a piece of blue Plexiglas, carved it into a funny, massive rectangular shape and bored a big, perfect, cylindrical hole through it with a power tool. Then I inserted a movement that my uncle had given me; or rather he had given me a watch that I promptly took to pieces! I screwed the thick Plexiglas face down with four big woodscrews. They were unique technical experiments, but I remained interested in watches, clipping pages from magazines, learning about all the Swiss brands, and so on.

Louise Neri: What was it about them that interested you so much?

Marc Newson: I was always fascinated by the idea of the watch as a little universe, a container, a time machine that held an enormously complex mechanism with many moving parts, each one perfectly made. It was practically impossible to see what was really going on inside, so they seemed like wonderful, mysterious objects to me.

Louise Neri: Are all watches analog?

Marc Newson: Yes, to some degree. My watches are very handmade and there are very few of them, which is partly why they are inherently valuable. There is no other way to make them, especially not with robots. Watches illustrate a skill set that has neither significantly evolved nor significantly atrophied over the last century, unlike most other artisanal practices.

What I also love is the idea that a clock could be miniaturized to the point where it could be put on the wrist…

Louise Neri: When did that happen?

Marc Newson: Pocket watches appeared in the 16th century, and then wristwatches were invented around the turn of the 20th century. Clocks were being miniaturized to the point where they could not get much smaller. Although many other things are being reduced to nano-dimensions, watches reached their limits, having to remain robust, useable and able to be read.

Louise Neri: What else is there for you beyond the practical concerns?

Marc Newson: The idea that you can have time with you wherever you are—that you can literally “take your time”! For me it always seemed like a sort of alchemy, like traveling with a bit of fire in prehistoric times!

Louise Neri: How, over the years, have you chosen which mechanisms to use, given all the available options?

Marc Newson: I’d love to say that on a technical level I make rigorous or considered choices but in reality it’s about what is actually available. The industry has become so consolidated—most of the watch companies are now owned by a handful of big groups—it depends on what you can get your hands on. As Ikepod is one of the few remaining independent companies, it has to wait in line for movements—which is all the more reason for our company to distinguish itself via design.

Ikepod Solaris Collection by Marc Newson + Interview

The Ikepod Solaris watch in yellow gold by Marc Newson

Louise Neri: So, would you agree that Ikepod watches are design-driven?

Marc Newson: Absolutely. In fact, most watches are. It’s an interesting parallel with Apple: in the computer industry, the inherent technology is available widely but what differentiates Apple is the design. Of course Apple’s success is due to a lot more than its packaging but what you see and its related functionality is key.

Louise Neri: A lot of your earlier watch designs were more self-consciously concerned with technical function.

Marc Newson: The first Megapode, which is still in production, had an analog flight calculator. It’s my favorite because of its slightly ‘over-technical’ appearance.

Louise Neri: This kind of technical complexity was really fashionable at the time, wasn’t it?

Marc Newson: Yes, I designed the Megapode in the mid-nineties and the huge POD before it, in the mid-eighties. I think that they anticipated the trend of big watches.

In general, I like all the extra things watches can be equipped to “do,” very few of which we actually use or need. A tiny watch movement can be tricked up to the point where it can do half a dozen extra things; it’s like hotting up a car! It’s no wonder that in the industry these extra features are called “complications.” I have been progressively simplifying my watches, but I could easily and happily make them complicated once more.

With the Solaris, however, I wanted to design a very simple, elegant dress watch.

Louise Neri: Why did you call it “Solaris”?

Marc Newson: After Andrei Tarkovsky’s unforgettable film based on the novel by Stanislaw Lem. Solaris suits this watch because it’s all about duality, about being double. I loved the idea of making a symmetrical two-faced object, where one face is visible and the other hidden. It’s always simultaneously up the right way and upside-down. The connection is quite abstract; the original story concerns the relationship between reality and dreams. My Solaris contains two time zones relating to two different places…

Ikepod Solaris Collection by Marc Newson + Interview

The Ikepod Solaris watch in ceramic by Marc Newson

Louise Neri: Can the wearer choose the time zones?

Marc Newson: Yes, in fact, it’s not just a watch that displays two different time zones recto-verso; it actually comprises two separate movements that are utterly independent of each other.

Louise Neri: How difficult would be to synchronize them perfectly? Or is that part of it, that they will never be completely synchronized?

Marc Newson: Yes, somewhat. I love the idea that there is always that element of slippage.

Louise Neri: It makes me think of Felix Gonzales-Torres’ work Untitled (Perfect Lovers), 1991: Two identical, battery-driven wall clocks were initially set to the same time, but they eventually move slightly out of sync. Thus Gonzales-Torres transformed neutral, readymade timepieces into a personal and poetic meditation on human relationships, mortality, and time’s inevitable flow.

Marc Newson: In theory, the two movements in the Solaris will keep time because they are highly accurate quartz movements, rather than mechanical movements. But of course they will probably move slightly out of sync over time.

Louise Neri: But given that the watch faces have no second hand, any discrepancy will probably go unnoticed. Can they be reset at will?

Marc Newson: Absolutely, although this is probably at odds with the industry. But given that so many of our clients travel or live between two places, they might well appreciate the idea.

Louise Neri: Is the Solaris a unisex watch?

Marc Newson: Yes, I’ve never really designed for men or women but most of my watches tend to appeal to men because of their scale and weight. Perhaps this is the first of my watches that will appeal as much, if not more, to women.

Louise Neri: The size of the face also relates more to a woman’s watch, although the case is larger.

Marc Newson: However the gold and white gold watches have a masculine presence simply because gold is ultra-dense and heavy.

Louise Neri: Is the same true of the ceramic version?

Marc Newson: Not at all: ceramic is, in order of magnitude, much lighter than gold. Weight is an interesting quality to play with. The weight of a watch is a particular and esoteric thing.

Louise Neri: The flexible mesh watchstrap is also a more “feminine” touch.

Marc Newson: I also love the fact that mesh is a bit old-fashioned. Mesh is very difficult to find these days and we had to develop this particular variation to make it strong enough yet flexible.

Louise Neri: It makes me think of jewelry trends in the twenties and thirties; also of Elsa Peretti’s mesh chains for Tiffany…

Marc Newson: Sure, but in this case there are some technical limitations and real structural issues to deal with, such as the fact that the strap has to be strong enough to hold the watch in place on the wrist.

Louise Neri: How is the mesh produced?

Marc Newson: The production of metal mesh is another complex and specialized micro-industry. Much of it requires hand finishing. We work with a German company that makes mesh and chains for many different industries and a host of industrial applications, as well as for the textile industry. Companies such as this one use metals and industrial materials in such a forgiving and seductive way. So I was determined to work with them for the Solaris.

Prices: 6700 €, 16750 €, 24000 €

Ikepod website

Related Posts at The Watchismo Times

Marc Newson designs Jaeger LeCoultre Atmos Clock

Ikepod Black Hole In the Light

The Ikepod Has Landed...Again

Newson Clock & Watch Pre-Ikepod


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How Much Time Do You Have Left? - New Special Edition Black PVD Coated Accurate and Decider Watches by Mr. Jones

How Much Time Do You Have Left? - New Special Edition Black PVD Coated Accurate and Decider Watches by Mr. Jones
How Much Time Do You Have Left? - New Special Edition Black PVD Coated Accurate and Decider Watches by Mr. JonesMr Jones Watches have produced two new special edition watches. Both models
feature black PVD coating which gives a hard-wearing, elegant finish.

These are serious watches for the serious times we find ourselves in. The black coating on the watch case is matched on the buckle and completed with a black leather strap and (what else!) black stitching.

Mr Jones Watches is the new cult watch brand from London. They believe that a watch should do more than just tell the time.

All the Mr Jones Watches are designed by Crispin Jones, they are genuine indie products entirely conceived and executed following a singular vision.

These models will be available for a limited period only.

How Much Time Do You Have Left? - New Special Edition Black PVD Coated Accurate and Decider Watches by Mr. Jones
How Much Time Do You Have Left? - New Special Edition Black PVD Coated Accurate and Decider Watches by Mr. Jones




This is a special edition of the most accurate wristwatch you can buy - the hour hand reads "remember", the minute hand "you will die".

The dial and rim of the glass are mirrored, so the wearer is reflected in the watch face.The Accurate is a link to the tradition of the memento mori - an object designed to remind us that life is brief and that we should seize the moment while we are here.

The Accurate is our best selling model and we're very pleased with how well this special edition looks on the wrist.

The Accurate, Special edition: $125

Product Page-->LINK

How Much Time Do You Have Left? - New Special Edition Black PVD Coated Accurate and Decider Watches by Mr. JonesHow Much Time Do You Have Left? - New Special Edition Black PVD Coated Accurate and Decider Watches by Mr. Jones




The New Decider helps you make decisions. As the seconds tick round the words “yes” and “no” are alternately displayed.

When you need to make a decision, simply glance at the watch for your answer. A magnifying dome sits just above the answer window to aid visibility.

The New Decider may not always give the right decision, but as Tony Soprano observes,“a wrong decision is better than indecision”.

The New Decider, Special edition: $145

Product page-->LINK

Other recently released Mr. Jones Watches featured below;

How Much Time Do You Have Left? - New Special Edition Black PVD Coated Accurate and Decider Watches by Mr. JonesMR. JONES - THE AVERAGE DAY

This watch eschews the conventional division of a day into 24 hours, instead it divides into units of median daily routine.

The dial shows a breakdown of what average people do on an average day, so you’re able to see what you yourself should - on average - be doing at any time.


How Much Time Do You Have Left? - New Special Edition Black PVD Coated Accurate and Decider Watches by Mr. JonesMr. Jones The Mantra

The Mantra alternates a very positive statement (e.g. "you are amazing") with a very negative one (e.g. "nobody likes you"). Every hour the watch displays one positive message and one negative message (the wedge that you read the statement through is also the hour hand).

Over time The Mantra makes the arrogant person more humble and makes the humble more confident.

How Much Time Do You Have Left? - New Special Edition Black PVD Coated Accurate and Decider Watches by Mr. JonesMr. Jones Original "The Decider"

The Decider is a watch that helps you make decisions: as the seconds tick round you see either the word "YES" or "NO" displayed on the watch face; when you need to make a decision you simply look at your watch for your answer.

How Much Time Do You Have Left? - New Special Edition Black PVD Coated Accurate and Decider Watches by Mr. JonesMR. JONES THE FUTURE

The Future is now! This watch displays a carpe diem message along with the time. The hour and minute hand make up the words “the future”, whilst the face alternately displays “is” and “now”. This watch is a handy reminder to the wearer to live in the present.

How Much Time Do You Have Left? - New Special Edition Black PVD Coated Accurate and Decider Watches by Mr. Jones MR. JONES THE WATCHER

Two characters on the watch enact a tiny choreographed play. They look all around, but never rest on the other’s gaze. The faces keep their tiny vigil on your wrist and are always ready to share a moment of micro-poetry whenever you look at your watch.

The two faces each have a small magnifying dome over them to aid visibility.

How Much Time Do You Have Left? - New Special Edition Black PVD Coated Accurate and Decider Watches by Mr. JonesMr. Jones LOVES ME

The design of this watch is inspired by the game of effeuiller la marguerite in which “loves me, loves me not” is spoken while plucking the petals of a flower.

Loves Me acts as a never-ending, animated flower that answers love dilemmas: pulling up the winding crown stops the mechanism and reveals cupid’s verdict.


How Much Time Do You Have Left? - New Special Edition Black PVD Coated Accurate and Decider Watches by Mr. JonesThe Original ACCURATE

How Much Time Do You Have Left? - New Special Edition Black PVD Coated Accurate and Decider Watches by Mr. Jones
MR. JONES MORE OR LESS

This watch offers you two ways of looking at the passing of time - around the circumference of the dial the words "one more, one less" slowly revolve. This presents a balanced way of viewing the passing of time in our lives.


Product Pages--> LINK

Related posts at The Watchismo Times;
Haunted Horology
All Memento Mori Stories
Mystery Dial Stories
Concept Watches
Artist Watch Stories
Designer Stories

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The 1974 La Chaux de Fonds Concept Watches of Jozsef Scherer

The 1974 La Chaux de Fonds Concept Watches of Jozsef Scherer
35 years ago, professor of design Jozsef Scherer entered some bold wristwatch concepts to the 1974 La Chaux-de-Fonds International competition for watch and clock design.

His entries were based upon three parameters;

1. A wristwatch for users of either sex - to be inspired by the rectangle.

2. A quartz-crystal electronic wristwatch - with 7 segment digital display

3. Watch-free category - creation of a timepiece to be worn or carried on the person (pendant, pocket, etc)

Below is his entry for the wrist-free category, a tubular pocket watch, pendant watch, table clock, and/or art object. The digital time is display upon extending the tubes to reveal the digits.

The 1974 La Chaux de Fonds Concept Watches of Jozsef SchererTube table clock

The 1974 La Chaux de Fonds Concept Watches of Jozsef Scherer

The expanding tube

The 1974 La Chaux de Fonds Concept Watches of Jozsef Scherer
Assorted tube clock/watch sketches

The 1974 La Chaux de Fonds Concept Watches of Jozsef Scherer

The 1974 La Chaux de Fonds Concept Watches of Jozsef SchererTube pocket watch

The 1974 La Chaux de Fonds Concept Watches of Jozsef Scherer

Tube pendant watch

The 1974 La Chaux de Fonds Concept Watches of Jozsef SchererAlso a tube wristwatch

And for his electronic quartz crystal electronic watch entry, Mr. Scherer developed the very modern looking semi-sideview models below. You can also see his preliminary sketches below that.

The 1974 La Chaux de Fonds Concept Watches of Jozsef Scherer
The 1974 La Chaux de Fonds Concept Watches of Jozsef Scherer
The 1974 La Chaux de Fonds Concept Watches of Jozsef Scherer
The 1974 La Chaux de Fonds Concept Watches of Jozsef Scherer
The 1974 La Chaux de Fonds Concept Watches of Jozsef Scherer
And finally, his entries for a unisex wristwatch based upon the rectangle;

The 1974 La Chaux de Fonds Concept Watches of Jozsef Scherer
The 1974 La Chaux de Fonds Concept Watches of Jozsef Scherer
The 1974 La Chaux de Fonds Concept Watches of Jozsef Scherer
Although not the winner of the competition, Mr. Scherer's designs were obviously ahead of their time!

Since 1980, Mr. Scherer has been a professor of design at Moholy-Nagy Art and Design University in Budapest.

See related posts;
All Sideview Watches
One-of-a-kind LEDs of Andrew Grima
History of LED Calculator Watches
History of Dynamic Scattering LCD
History of Solar LED Watches
Opus 8 Mechanical Digital
Mechanico Mechanical Digital of de Grisogono
LED-LCD Watch Combos
Zenith Analog/Digital Hybrid
Other Analog-Digital Posts
Alternative Displays
All Digital Watch Posts
All LED Watch Related Posts
All Vintage Watch Posts


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